Tag: culture

Article Dump #24 – Weekly Article Dump

Article Dump #24 - Dev Leader (Image by http://www.sxc.hu)

Article Dump #24

Welcome to the 24th issue of my (nearly) weekly article dumps. I don’t have a theme or an update this week, so it’s kept pretty short. I hope you find the following articles interesting though! Leave me a comment if you have any opinions on these

Articles

  • The 7 Values That Drive IDEO: In this article, the CEO of IDEO Tim Brown talks about the various values that his organization embraces to have a creative culture. Some of the ideas in the slides seem really high level or like generic fluff, but try thinking about what they would mean in your organization. It’s one thing to glance at IDEO’s list and say “Yeah, yeah… That’s nice…” but when you actually think about how that fits in with your organization, you might actually realize you don’t embody those values. Do you learn from failure? Does your organization promote an ask for forgiveness not permission approach? Would this make sense in your organization? Just some food for thought, but I thought a lot of these values were interesting to think about and how embracing them might change the organization I work in.
  • The 15 Most Annoying Coworkers of All Time: Ilya Pozin put together a pretty funny article on different types of coworkers you’ll encounter in your career. I got worried that I might be #13 on the list… The office comedian who isn’t actually funny. Apparently this post got a lot of flack in the comments on LinkedIn. I guess people were expecting a really serious article on how to deal with these different types of problems in the workplace. I didn’t really have expectations when I read it, aside from not wanting to find myself on the list. Maybe the main take away point here is… don’t annoy your colleagues!
  • Companies Frustrate Innovative Employees: Gijs van Wulfen takes a different perspective on innovation. So many people now are writing about embracing failure (so far as you learn from it). I’m actually a big believer in that approach–take controlled risks and learn from things that don’t go as expected. Gijs’ perspective is a little bit different: forget embracing failure; boost the innovation effectiveness rate! Gijs goes through a workflow for trying to improve innovation at various steps in the process. Pretty interesting!
  • Your Boss is Happier Than You (But Shouldn’t Be): Jeff Haden tells us something we probably all (let’s say in the majority of circumstances) know: your boss is happier than you. Big surprise right? They get to make decisions, have fewer bosses than you, and they make more money. Sounds like a good reason to be happier, no? But if your boss is happier than you, those probably aren’t the exact reasons. Your superiors are likely happier than you because of autonomy. They get a bit more freedom to do accomplish goals in their own way. Jeff has a big list of reasons why your boss is probably happier… and none of them are about money.
  • When is it a Good Idea to write Bad Code?: Rejoice in the first programming article for this week! Tech debt. Ever heard of it? If not, it’s not likely that you’ve never encountered it in your programming career. I’d wager at least one of the last handful of big features you implemented in your code base either had to deal with some tech debt or perhaps even introduced some tech debt. Brad Carleton has put together a big list of different types of tech debt and what they mean in your project. I highly suggest you read it if your a programmer. There’s a lot of things to be aware of with tech debt but it’s important to remember that tech debt isn’t always the worst thing that could happen. Sometimes it’s okay to sacrifice a sub-par design now in order to get some software out the door. Your users might try it out and decide they don’t like the functionality anyway, and you’d end up re-writing it again!
  • “Happiness” vs “Meaningfulness” — The Surprising DifferenceAlex Banayan‘s article discusses the difference between happiness and meaningfulness. It appears as though often happiness and meaningfulness are not necessarily aligned. For example, it might be easy to chase a life of happiness that lacks meaning, or dedicate your life to something meaningful but not be very happy while doing it. The real question is, is it possible to achieve a balance where you’re leading a fulfilling life that keeps you happy? Alex talks briefly about five different categories and how each can sway to something more meaningful or something that provides more happiness. Are you living a happy and fulfilling life? Do you have to balance these five categories carefully?

Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week. Thanks!


Happy Holidays – Weekly Article Dump

Happy Holidays – Weekly Article Dump

Happy Holidays

The holiday season is upon us, so I’d like to start by extending my best wishes for you to have a safe and happy holiday. I’ve personally been pretty busy the past few weeks wrapping year-end stuff up at work, so I’m looking forward to a few days of being able to catch my breath a bit. If you have some time off from work, I’m hoping you’ll get a chance to do the same over the holidays. I can’t sit idle for too long though. I don’t like not feeling productive, so once I’ve caught up a bit on some well deserved rest, I’ll be right back at it!

The holidays and end of the year are a great time to reflect on everything that’s happened in the last 12 months. Did you have goals that set you set and accomplished? What about things that you didn’t get to achieve or complete? Were you able to assist others in their goals? Maybe a year is too long for you to wait between points of reflection, but the holiday season provides the perfect opportunity for you to reflect–it’s at the end of the year, and generally you get some time off from your day-to-day!

At Magnet Forensics, we had a year-end review celebration and planning for next year. This was an incredible eye-opener for a lot of the amazing things we did this year. In fact, this last year was filled with so many exciting moments for our company that I thought around half of them were things that occurred in 2012. I was mistaken though. We’ve just been doing that much. I’m incredibly proud of the entire team and what we’ve been able to accomplish.

For my personal growth, this year certainly covered a lot of ground. I was able to work on some new exciting technologies like I had set goals for, and I had actually managed to take on more responsibilities in the workplace while reducing my perceived workload. I’m proud of what I’ve accomplished, but I’ve also been able to identify a few areas that I’d like to improve in the new year. I don’t want to call it my “New Year Resolution” for fear of it never coming to fruition, but I think by acknowledging some areas I l’d like to improve I’m setting myself up to be constantly aware of them.

Try to get some personal reflection in this holiday season. Celebrate what you’ve accomplished and raise the bar even higher for next year!

Articles

I missed an update last week, so I’ll combine both of my smaller article summaries into one!

  • How One Company Replaced Meetings And Bureaucracy With Pairs, Ceremonies, And Storytelling: When I shared this article by Drake Baer on social media, I mentioned that there was one of the three suggestions that I felt might not be met as well. Any guesses yet?

    The first suggestion in the list is working in pairs. The notion of working in pairs has some popularity in programming (i.e. Pair Programming) because you get two sets of eyes and two brains behind tackling the same problem. Partners get rotated every-so-often and you can share knowledge really well this way.

    The second suggestion was about story telling. Story telling really let’s a company philosophy or mission get spread through the organization in a natural way. This also works for receiving customer  perspective and diffusing it as requirements from the user.

    The final idea presented in the article was regarding ritualization. Taking potentially boring or inefficient meetings and transforming them into rituals can provide more meaning and structure to them.

    If you haven’t guessed yet, I figured item #1 may be met with some resistance. I personally don’t enjoy pairing past the point of brain storming ideas together. After that, it feels inefficient to me. I also believe that certain individuals have a “comfort zone” for where they feel efficient in their work. So even if pairing works well for 95% of people (let’s pretend) then for that other 5% it might really be disruptive for them. I’m starting to learn that applying practices uniformly across a team often doesn’t make sense.

  • Some Workaholics Have More Fun: A quick one from Hiroshi Mikitani, but still very worth mentioning in my opinion. When people think of a workaholic, it’s often associated with a negative perspective. But maybe it’s not so black and white. Would you say there’s a difference between someone driven by external factors (e.g. meet deadlines for the boss, make more money, etc…) or someone driven by  internal factors (e.g. create something innovative, help or make a difference in the world, etc…)? I’m not claiming that these can never overlap or anything, but perhaps it’s just a bit of a perspective tweak. Take it or leave it 🙂

  • The Art of Listening: In this article by Gurbaksh Chahal, he touches on some really important aspects of listening. And yes, while listening is definitely important in the workplace, you can likely apply his principles to other areas in life. First, you want to engage people and let them know you’re actually listening. This can be conveyed will by eye contact and body language. For me, I like to lock my computer and turn to people when they come up to talk. It’s the perfect way to let them know they have my undivided attention. The next step is actively listening. Stop thinking of your response while someone is talking. Try actually listening to the speaker the entire time and interpret their words. There are no rules that say you’re not allowed to pause for thought to formulate your response when the other person is done talking! Gurbaksh has a few more pointers, and I strongly suggest you check out his article.
  • 8 Ways Using Humor Will Make You a Better Leader: I’m a big fan of using humour in the workplace, but sometimes I’m not sure if I use it effectively or take things to far. That’s why I always jump to these humour-in-the-workplace articles when they pop up. In this article by Kevin Daum, there are two key points I wanted to address. The first is that humour really does help disarm tense situations. Sometimes there are difficult situations at work, and using humour (properly) can really help break the ice. Of course, you still need to take caution that the humour you’re using isn’t going to make the situation worse. The second point is that humour helps build a bonded community. I think humour can have a similar impact to story telling in an organization when it’s used effectively. You can always related back to “inside jokes” when you were dealing with some high pressure times, some bad code, or just because something funny came up at work. You can always bring the newbies into the inside jokes too and make them feel completely welcome.
  • The 8-Hour Workday Doesn’t Really Work: If you feel like the typical eight hour work day really isn’t your thing… You might not be alone. Jeff Haden put together this pretty informative article about workdays and productivity you might find interesting. There’s tons of ground covered, including a few tips at the end for how you can optimize our work day. For example, try focusing on four or five things in a day that take up 90 minute slots. Certainly worth the read if you’re looking to hack your work-day.
  • The Hidden Danger of Success:  Another little article from Hiroshi Mikitani. So often we’re told to learn from our failures. But how are we supposed to learn from our successes? Hiroshi suggests we treat them equally. Sure, celebrate your success, but make sure you have take-away learnings from each of your successes. Don’t let them get to your head and always stay humble!
  • Keys to Resolving Conflict: Jim Sniechowski dives into some great points in resolving conflict. I think it’s a decent read for anyone who has ever been in some sort of debate or conflict. I imagine that’s most people! Anyway, two great points to start you off: Each side of the conflict needs to understand that there’s a mutual agreement that needs to be met and willingness to accept some of the other side is necessary for coming to a positive conclusion.
  • Four Principles to Inspire Innovation: Lockheed Martin’s CEO Marillyn Hewson provides four of her principles for innovation. Firstly, ensure there’s an environment that can cultivate innovation. Next, don’t treat innovation differently depending on the source. The final two principles I like to think of as one really. You want to innovate with a mission or goal that inspires and is driven by the values your organization embraces.

Please have a safe holiday season, but remember to relax and have a bit of fun too! Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week. Thanks!


Migration – Weekly Article Dump

Migration - Weekly Article Dump

Migration: Bye to the Pi

Well… it happened. If you checked in earlier this week, you might have noticed Dev Leader was completely down on Thursday. Quite a bummer… but the show must go on. Migration to a new host was necessary, but that wasn’t without some hiccups.

For me, having a site hosted was still a pretty new process. I had tried it a couple of times before, but running a web server that I controlled always felt better. Just more control I suppose. Migration started off sort of sour where I was required to re-install WordPress on my host a few times due to some technical difficulties… And of course, it was hard to sit still while I knew my site was down. Once I finally had WordPress launched, the only part of the migration that went smooth was having a backup of my site four hours before it went down. Talk about timing!

There’s silver lining in everything though, and this little migration blip was no different. My Raspberry Pi was a fun little box, but it wasn’t fast by any stretch of the imagination. Page loading times were a bit slow, and serving images could sometimes be terrifyingly slow. Now that the site is hosted, there should be a very noticeable performance improvement. Additionally, with the new host comes some additional reliability! That’s always awesome.

See? Migration wasn’t so bad after all, I guess! My list of things for any WordPress user to be doing regularly:

  • Back up your posts
  • Back up your comments if your readers are actively engaged in discussions
  • Back up the media you use on your blog
  • Export your plugin settings
  • Keep a list of plugins you have running

Even if you don’t have a plan for host migration any time in the near future, it’s always good to have the “worst case scenario” covered. The plugin BackWPup covers basically everything I mentioned above, so I’d recommend getting that setup if you don’t have any backup plan currently in place!

Articles

  • Feedback is the Breakfast of Champions: 10 Tips for Doing it Right: Anyone in a leadership position knows just how valuable being able to provide feedback is. Heck, anyone who is driven to improve themself craves feedback. Joel Peterson provides an awesome list of tips for being able to provide feedback. I’d say frequency, positivity, and confidentiality are among the top take away points from his list.
  • 10 ways to make your .NET projects play nice with others: First programming article in the list this week. I thought this one stood out because I think anyone working in a team has either heard some (most) of these or is trying to work through them. Troy Hunt has put together a list of 10 things that any developer working in a team should be conscious of to make sure their code plays well with their teammates. Number one on the list is the same as my number one. “Works on my machine” carries no validity. Why? Your customers don’t have your computer. It’s a frequent thing when working with the QA team and developers want to cover their butts… But it won’t cut it!
  • Only 13 percent of people worldwide actually like going to work: Had to share this one, because if the stat is real, it’s scary. It’s scary to think that almost 90% of people that go to work don’t actually like going. In Jena McGregor‘s article, this low rate is attributed to poor working conditions, job availability, and job engagement. On the bright side for us North Americans, we’re a bit higher at just under 30%. That’s still far too low for something we spend a majority of our lives doing. It’s important to find a company you can get behind, and I definitely lucked out with Magnet.
  • The New Science of Who Sits Where at WorkRachel Feintzeig shared an interesting article about seating in the workplace. I’ve shared some articles before about open concept offices and that I do enjoy working in them, but the seating perspective is pretty interesting. For example, changing your org hierarchy is one thing but unless people are changing their daily interactions, it won’t have that big of an effect. However, if seating arrangements are responsible for 40-60% of people’s daily interactions, simply moving people around will really stir the pot.
  • What is the Biggest Mistake Managers Make?: In John Murphy‘s article, he points out something that is probably less obvious than it should be. The biggest mistake a manager can make is focusing on the wrong things. He provides some steps to help align managers with the goals of their company to ensure that focus is in the necessary areas.
  • 8 strategies for successful culture change: Culture is something that is dynamic and always evolving within a company, but often there are things that are core to the company culture. What happens when you need to make some work culture changes? Michelle Smith shares some tips on how to approach a work culture shift.
  • Why Inspiring Leaders Don’t Sweat: Here was an article that hit home with me because I’m guilty of it. Panicking. Why is it bad if you’re panicking in a leadership position? The biggest problem is that your teammates will pick up on it and switch to a panick state too. It’s incredibly demotivating, and it’s usually at a time when motivation and inspiration is truly needed. In Steven Thompson‘s post, he talks about how and why to keep calm and lead on.
  • 3 Proven Ways to Make Tough Job Decisions: Jennifer Dulski discusses three approaches for helping make tough life and career decisions. At some point or another, most of us will be faced with making a decision in our career path that’s going to be difficult–difficult for you to decide or difficult for you to explain to those you’re close to. I think the “Sit With” approach is my favourite of the three.
  • 4 Ways to Have a Life Outside Your Business: This one should probably hit home with anyone working in a startup or running a business. Alexa von Tobel shares four tips for how to have a life outside of work and why having a life outside of work is necessary to be successful. I think something that’s often overlooked (somehow) is “me time”. I’m guilty of it too, but you get to a point when you’re not doing anything just for yourself. It’s great to be dedicated to your company and be passionate about your work, but it’s also importnt to step back, take a breath, and do something just for you.
  • 17 Things The Boss Should Never Say: Dave Kerpen has another great article on what not to say–this time from the boss’s perspective. Some of the worst ones in my opinion? Telling your teammates it’s only their problem (or not yours, at least) or being adamant about not evolving your perspective/processes. Some gems in there from quite a few business owners.
  • 9 Lessons From the World’s Best Mentors: This one is pretty quick from Chester Elton, but there’s a few different perspectives shared in here. Sone key points in my opinion are ensuring that you’re doing what you can to help others and not getting paralyzed by risk.
  • Key Reasons Delegating Is SO Difficult and What To Do About It: Most new managers and leaders have this problem. How do you delegate work? Perhaps you acquired your management or leadership position because you proved that technically you were very capable in your position. So how do you get others to do work you think you could be doing? Judith Sherven shares some insight on why being able to delegate is an incredibly important skill as a leader. After all, being able to grow as a leader means being able to effectively delegate responsibilities.
  • Want Greater Employee Engagement? Develop Intrapreneurs: In this article, Larry Myler talks about increasing employee engagement by developing intrapreneurs within your organization. It’s inline with what Tayun’s guest post was about the other week. Provide people autonomy and let them execute on their strengths. It’s a sure-fire way to increase engagement.

That’s it for this week! Hopefully there won’t be any more emergency host migrations any time in the near future (or ever again). Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.

Nick Cosentino – LinkedIn
Nick Cosentino – Twitter
Dev Leader – Facebook
Dev Leader – Google+
Nick’s CodeProject Articles

You can also check out Dev Leader on FlipBoard.


Intrapreneurship – Guest Blog by Tayfun Uzun

Intrapreneurship - Guest Blog by Tayfun Uzun (Photo by www.sxc.hu)

Last week I mentioned a colleague of mine, Tayfun Uzun, had a little surprise. He’s put together a great write up on intrapreneurship and what it means to be an intrapreneur.

The importance of Intrapreneurship

Innovation is the life-blood of any organization; we have all heard it and one way or another understand it. Actually, let me rephrase that. Revenue is the life-blood of any organization, but innovation begets revenue. One big movement in large companies is the idea of intraprenuership, the act of behaving like an entrepreneur within an established organization. Intrapreneurship is baked into your culture–it starts from your first hires in a start-up and needs to persist as you grow. It is not something that you can take a two day course and learn, much like entrepreneurship.

Why do you need intrapreneurship? Well, innovation is what sells. Companies have come and gone because they were stuck in the status quo, not innovating and thus becoming stale. The status quo is boring and demotivating. While these companies make great case studies, they do little to motivate the people involved. Intrapreneurship instills the drive, creativity and urgency into your employees. You can either have one person be an innovator or you can make the entire organization live and breathe innovation.

So, how do you foster an environment where your employees can feel comfortable being intrapreneurs? There are a few things I have found effective to get people out of their shell and try different things.

Be Agile

Following the agile model of iterative product development allows you to be able to test your innovations more frequently and get feedback quickly. This is a key component to intraprenuership. The waterfall methodology doesn’t allow time to tweak ideas and prototypes often resulting on those projects being scrapped for high priority planned projects. With agile you can time-box your innovation, forcing the intraprenuers to feel the same pressure an entrepreneur would feel when building products. A good way to do this is having regularly scheduled hack-a-thons where employees can work on their own innovations for a set period of time.

Encourage and Lead by Example

If you are the founder this one is easier than you think. As a leader, people look up to you and imitate you. As the founder, it is not uncommon for your employees to want to be entrepreneurial like you. Just listen to their ideas. No. Actually listen. I get it–you are the visionary, the entrepreneur–but there is value in hearing and seeing the prototypes being developed by intrapreneurs. Imagine injecting your entrepreneurial spirit into each one of your employees, because that is what you are doing by listening and providing them the platform to innovate.

By providing the means for your employees to become intrapreneurs, you are indirectly improving their day-to-day planned work. It allows them to view what they may consider mundane tasks in a different light and become solution-based thinkers. I often think of innovation as a prize–I am glad to do the grunt work as long as I get to innovate frequently–and in turn this affects how motivated I am as an employee.

Don’t Bet The Farm

If you are gaining traction, don’t pivot. Slowly start empowering the intrapreneurs to be product visionaries too. A good rule, (over)used in agile, is the 80/20 rule. In your next project, try to have 20% innovation driven by the intrapreneurs in your organization, while 80% are planned features. A good way to do this is to take out one or two features that you have planned for a sprint/release, and let the intrapreneurs research and build something. This is a good way to foster creative thinking and innovation with little risk.

Tayfun Uzun was one of the first software engineers at Magnet Forensics and currently is the Product Development Manager, responsible for the Software Engineering team.


Job Titles and Responsibilities

Job Titles and Responsibilities (Image provided by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Your New Job Title

Congrats! You did it! You finally have that new job title you’ve been working so hard towards! Let’s be honest with each other here–you were working hard for the title, not because you just wanted to see your company flourish with all the hard work you were putting in. Of course that wasn’t bad or anything, it was just a nice side effect of you getting your new job title. Some great things happened once you received your new job title too! Your responsibilities shifted so now nobody can come after you when your pesky clients are complaining about your sales process, when your code won’t compile into your finished product, or when employees are having conflicts in the workplace.

You’re literally only responsible for the two new tasks that you have attached to your job title! Besides, why would the company keep all your colleagues around if you were supposed to be doing some of their work too? That’s just ridiculous, right? Besides, if you ever had to do anything outside of your assigned responsibilities, you’d become inefficient!

I should also congratulate you for the first steps in creating the negative culture that may bring your company to its knees. With that outlook, you’re going to be the poison to your company culture, and you’ll slowly kill off any employees that actually wanted to see a successful company. The entitlement will start oozing out of every employee within the organization, barriers between tasks will start shooting up, and your company will grind to a halt when anything outside of process happens.

Because you won’t pick up the slack for Jane’s work when she’s getting overloaded because it’s not attached to your job title is the same reason John isn’t going to help you out when you need it. It’s going to be the same reason Bill isn’t helping the new co-ops who started (because he’s a received a Director of Technical Management Lead position of product-X-part-B now, and interns are basically insects to him) and Bridgette isn’t doing anything to help her team lead resolve conflicts within her team.

Congratulations on starting the vicious cycle that will kill off the business and the culture that once made it great.

Why Have Job Titles Then?

Job titles do serve a purpose and that purpose is sure as hell not to limit you. Plain and simple, your job title and the tasks associated with it tell other people that you’re responsible for something. That does not imply the inverse. Think about it this way: if you were to assume that everything always worked as planned and things were perfect, it wouldn’t make any sense to put more resources towards something than what you’d need. Sure, maybe you need two people to manage the on-boarding process for your interns so there’s some overlap in task, or four people to manage selling your product, but you wouldn’t assign six people to do a three person job. It just wouldn’t make sense! Because of that, we have job titles and associated tasks that go along with them so we know what we’re responsible for. So if everything is going flawlessly and managing the new marketing interns isn’t part of my responsibilities but reaching out to customers or building software is, I’ll stick to my role.

You don’t live in a dream world. Surprise.

Things are almost never perfect. If they are, then you’re lucky, but unfortunately it probably won’t last. There are too many unknowns to always plan perfectly and sometimes things just come up. This is where your job title and position really shine. If we know that Ted is the manager of XYZ and he has responsibilities A, B, and C, then when the pressure starts building on the company he should be cracking down on those things. You wouldn’t expect Ted to be off trying to take on some extra work in a high-risk low-return option in the company if he’s under pressure to get his main responsibilities done. If it starts to become overwhelming, we can hopefully allocate more resources over to help out with Ted’s tasks because it’s starting to become unmanageable for one person. Maybe it means injecting more resources (by hiring more awesome people like Ted) or by temporarily (or even permanently) shifting some responsibilities of others to take on stuff Ted once solely managed.

For now, at the end of the day those responsibilities belong to Ted. He’s part of the company because he’s taken on the role that needs to fulfill those responsibilities. If he’s having trouble keeping up, it’s also his responsibility to let his manager or leader know that he’s running into roadblocks that keep him from effectively getting the job done. If they’re any good, they’ll listen, and if they’re amazing, they’ll hopefully notice it before Ted sees it.

Job Titles Should Not Imply Limits

So, a job title indicates what one is responsible for. You’ll notice I didn’t say that those tasks are the only thing a person is responsible for though, and that’s certainly on purpose. If you want to be part of a successful company, you need to realize that putting up barriers and acting on entitlement isn’t going to get you there. Let’s revisit my Ted example.

So the pressure is building, and Ted is strapped for time. He’s been able to keep on top of responsibilities A and B, but C is definitely falling behind compared to the others. And guess what? Ted’s just caught the flu so he’s going to be out of commission for the next week or so. So what do your job responsibilities look like now that Ted is out of the picture?

If you’re like the person I was mocking in the opening paragraphs, this is where things really start to go sour. You have some critical parts of your business that are falling behind and your superstar resource isn’t able to take care of one of his three responsibilities. Unfortunately, John, Jane, Bill, and Bridgette all took on the same mentality and they’re sticking to their own responsibilities. Because Ted will figure it out… or someone else will… Right? Or someone else won’t, I suppose, since by now everyone else is adopting this exact same mindset. That type of company culture is sure looking great right about now, isn’t it! Just about as great as Ted’s responsibility C is looking.

The alternative is that you don’t let your job titles create barriers. Sure, Ted is responsible for A, B, and C. He’s been able to help Bridgette and Bill out when he had a bit of down time and they were getting swamped by some large orders from a new promising client. Ted knew that it was a key deal though so he dug in with them and helped where he could. He kept on top of his own responsibilities, but he put in some extra hours to make sure Bill and Bridgette would nail those orders. And you know what? Jane saw that Ted was putting in some extra time and how much it was able to help the business after he helped Bill and Bridgette. The next time Jane saw John falling a bit behind on his coding tasks, she decided she’d come in early for a few days and help him meet the deadline for the feature he was working on.

In the end everyone did what they had to as per their job titles, but nobody let their job titles hold them back from helping make the company successful.

Summary

There are pros and cons to job titles. If you can see the big picture and you’re aimed at being part of a successful company, you’re not going to let your job title hold you back from doing great things and helping where you’re needed. Everyone in the company should have a common goal of making awesome products or services for the customers, and sometimes that means putting in some extra effort where you’re not required to based on your job title. The alternative is a pretty grim path to take, especially as more employees start to adopt that mind set.

Some advice to stay on the right track:

  • Take care of your own responsibilities first. Getting your hands in everything all at once and all the time might mean that you can’t get your own responsibilities taken care of.
  • Don’t let your job title restrict you. If you can help someone out and keep on top of your own tasks, then offer a hand!
  • Remember that things almost never go 100% according to plan, so plan for the unexpected.
  • If you have a set of skills that carry over well to someone else’s position, consider meeting up and seeing how you can help out.
  • Keep in mind that the efficiency of your company is only as good as all of the components working together. If some part of it is hurting, the whole company feels it.

Do what you’re required to based on your job title, and then do some more. Being helpful won’t hurt you.


  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

    Verified Services

    View Full Profile →

  • Copyright © 1996-2010 Dev Leader. All rights reserved.
    Jarrah theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress