Tag: free

CircleCI + BitBucket => Free Continuous Integration!

CircleCI is a service that I heard about from a friend that allows you to get continuous integration pipelines built up for your repositories… And it does it quick and easy. Also, free if you’re someone like me and you don’t have a large demand for getting builds done! I wanted to write about my experience with getting CircleCI wired up with BitBucket, which I like to use for my project hosting, and hopefully it’ll help you get started.

First thing, signing up is super easy if you have BitBucket because you can oauth right away with it. CircleCI will show you your projects & repositories that you have in BitBucket and you can decide which one you’d like to get started with. You can navigate to the projects in their new UI from the “Add Projects” menu.

CircleCI Left Navigation

When you click “Add Projects” you’ll be met with a list that looks like this but… With your own projects and not mine ๐Ÿ™‚

Circle CI + BitBucket Project Listing

On this screen, you’ll want to select “Set Up Project” for the project of your choice. For me, I was dealing with a .NET project (which I’ve already setup) so I selected it and was presented with the following screen. It also allows you to pick a template out to get started:

CircleCI Template Dropdown

However, I needed to change the default template to get things to work properly when I had nuget packages! We’re missing a restore step. With some help from my friend Graeme, we were able to transform the sample from this:

 version: 2.1

 orbs:
  win: circleci/windows@2.2.0

 jobs:
   build:
     executor: win/default     
    
     steps:
       - checkout
       - run: dotnet build

To now include the nuget restore step prior to building!

 version: 2.1

 orbs:
  win: circleci/windows@2.2.0

 jobs:
   build:
     executor: win/default     
    
     steps:
       - checkout
       - run:
          name: Restore
          command: dotnet restore
       - run:
          name: Build
          command: dotnet build -c Release

Once you save this, CircleCi will make a branch called “circleci-project-setup” on your remote. It then goes ahead and runs your build for you! When the build for this new remote branch succeeded, I pushed this configuration to my “master” branch so that all builds on master going forward would get continuous integration builds.

Checking the CircleCI dashboard now looks like the following:

CircleCI Successful Pipelines

You can see pipeline #1 is on the branch where the test circleci configuration was made (and passed). Pipeline #2 is once I added this commit onto my master branch and pushed up! Now I have continuous integration for pushing to my lib-nexus-collections-generic BitBucket project. When I check out my commit page, I can see the new commits after the configuration landed get a nice green check when the builds pass on CircleCI:

BitBucket Commit Listing With Builds

So with a few easy steps, you can not only have free source hosting in BitBucket but free continuous integration from CircleCI. Every time you push code to a remote branch, you kick off a build! This is only the starting point as you can configure CircleCI to do much more than just restore nuget packages and build .NET solutions ๐Ÿ™‚


Experimenting with Paid for Ads for Web Traffic

Experimenting with Paid for Ads for Web Traffic

Why Did I Consider Paid for Ads?

I wroteย a post about focusing on some of my strengths in order to minimize risk in new areas, and part of that meant focusing on increasing brand awareness for DevLeader as a proving ground. The idea of driving more web traffic to my blog via ads came up because I was interested in experimenting with Instagram ads for my show car branding, but not knowing anything about paid for ads made taking that first step feel pretty risky.

What should I expect for paying for ads? What will $1 get me? What will $10 get me? I have no idea where to start with this kind of thing, so I felt it was important to use my more solid brand, DevLeader, as the basis for this experiment. If I can watch what happens with traffic to this blog by playing with ads, then I can apply that learning to my vehicle brand.

Free Credit For Ads!

One thing that I found when playing with some of my SEO tools is that many paid-for ad services will actually give you a coupon or some sort of matching credit for using their ad service. What does that mean? Well, like almost everything in life… if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. The coupons or credits don’t mean that you get to pay nothing for your ads, but it’s still a cool opportunity. Generally, these services will say “If you spend X dollars with our ad service, we’ll give you a credit to worth Y dollars that you can use for your NEXT set of ads”.

Make sense? They want to cover your NEXT purchase you make with them to get you on board with them. So it’s not a free experiment to try this out, but it means that if you’re going to drop $100 into it, that $100 might technically stretch out to be valued at $200 if you were to get a $100 coupon from one of these services.

Just something to think about! If you’re serious about looking into advertising and you’re willing to make the initial investment, it seems like a great opportunity.

Google AdWords

The obvious choice for me to start with was Google AdWords because all of my accounts are linked up in someway through Google at various points, and I use a lot of their tooling. The setup was very simple, but you’ll need to remember to have your credit card on hand. Like I said, nothing is free. You can stop your ads at any time though, so you don’t need to be paranoid about accidentally spending $500 on an ad. I mean, I think it would be difficult to have that happen and I’m a total newbie.

Google AdWords guides you through setting up your first ads pretty well, especially for someone that’s never done this before. When it comes time to pick keywords and bidding strategies… I sort of just guessed. It’s an experiment, right? They offer tools to measure your metrics, so you can try changing keywords to see how the effectiveness changes. I started by creating a search campaign that would maximize clicks. I set my spending limit to $3/day. Picked some popular keywords for my blog, like programming, C#, and Unity. And… now I wait to see what happens! I hope to follow up on all of this experimentation to share my learnings in this area so that anyone else on the fence can learn from my experiences.

For free credits, Google AdWords claims to match up to $150 of your first months spending, so I think I’m going to try shooting for that. I’ll start off at spending $3/day and see if I can experiment with a few different options for ads. By the end of the first month, I hope to use all $150 of my initial investment so that I’ll have $150 from Google to play with in the upcoming months!

Bing Ads

Bing Ads was a cool option to explore after setting up Google AdWords, so I suggest if you’re going to try both of these that you do Google AdWords first. Once I created my account for Bing, I was actually able to import my Google AdWords campaign I created extremely easily. I didn’t even have to think about it. I plan to measure the return on investment of both of these with the same campaign setup to see which one is more effective.

The great thing about Bing Ads? Once you spend $25 (USD), they’ll give you $100 (USD) for your next purchases. Just a $25 experiment that if it works well, I can get 3x the investment back to play with! Very cool!


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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I have nearly a decade of professional hands on software engineering experience in parallel to leading multiple engineering teams to great results. I'm into bodybuilding, modified cards, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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