Tag: Ignantt

Double Down On Your Strengths!

Double Down on Your Strengths - https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/en/view-image.php?image=130306

Double Down: Why I’m Working This

I haven’t written in a while, and despite setting a goal for myself to start writing more, I’m not going to kick my own butt over not getting around to it. Actually, if anything my priorities and goals have been evolving over the past while and it’s been a great growing opportunity. Previously, I wanted to start up writing again to work on my ability to self-reflect. In all honesty, other factors came into play and this started to happen more naturally without forcing myself into writing more.

Now that my goals are changing again, I’m realizing that I need to come up with some creative solutions for addressing them. For total transparency, one of my hobby goals is creating a brand for my show car, Ignantt. It’s a fun hobby of mine, and in order to keep it going I’m looking into sponsorship opportunities to take things to the next level. Sponsors are interested in your social media reach, and rightfully so. They want to make sure they can reach a wider audience by working with you.

I’ve been active on social media for my vehicle’s brand, but I’m interested in accelerating this. One option I’m exploring is paid promotions, but like many people, I’m a little bit skeptical and I feel weird about spending money out of my pocket to do this. Social media marketing is certainly not a strength of mine, but I would love to work on that.

So that’s where my creative strategy comes in!

Focus on Weaknesses or Double Down?

I read a lot about focusing on your weaknesses to become better and more balanced, and that concept makes sense to me. It’s going to take trial and error in addition to consistent effort to become better at something. Time. Resources. It’s just the nature of the beast. I’ll give you a few examples:

I’m interested in strength training. When you’re looking to improve a lift, whether it’s your bench press, your squat, your deadlift, or any other lift, you need to actively train that movement. As a novice, you’ll quickly see strength improvements. However, as your body adapts these improvements slow down. If you’re trying to increase your one rep max and progress is stalling, it might be a great opportunity to train strength in other rep ranges that you’re lacking in. The side effect of this can be that your one rep max strength breaks through a plateau. Maybe you have a weak body part you need to build more strength in, and as a result, fixing this imbalance allows you to continue to progress in your strength. These are all examples of working on a weakness to become stronger in another area, and in this particular case it’s physical strength for a lift.

I’m also interested in bodybuilding. Similar examples apply here as with strength training because bodybuilding has a lot to do with symmetry and balance. Got big arms but tiny legs? You won’t do great on stage until you bring up your lagging legs because judges are looking for symmetry between your upper and lower half. Arnold Schwarzenegger was known for blasting his small calves until they were no longer a weakness. It’s about balance in bodybuilding, so turning your weaknesses into strengths is important.

Double Down to Reduce Risk

So why might I suggest that you double down on your strengths instead of just hammering away at your weaknesses? Well, in this case I’m looking to reduce risk in terms of time and money while taking a more slow and steady approach to working on my weakness. My blog for development and leadership has been more successful in terms of generating online traffic and ad revenue. It’s nothing crazy, but it’s been proven more successful than my other blogs or sites. For me to invest more time and money into this blog is actually minimal effort, minimal risk, and it’s also aligned with some of my other goals (which I’ll follow up about). In fact, instead of feeling like a forced scenario to write, I have some topics I’d like to write about because they’re recent learning experiences.

My thought process is that I can continue to use this blog to:

  •  Generate a small amount of revenue
  • Experiment with content creation in an area I’m stronger in and have more experience with
  • Use my learnings to carry into a different area/domain but with similar goals

Generalizing My Double Down Strategy

While I absolutely believe balance in many things if very important, I think there are opportunities where you can double down on your strengths to help improve in other areas.

This boils down to:

  • The area I’d like to improve in is something I’m lacking experience in and as a result, could be risky to heavily invest resources into
  • I have an area I’m strong in that has potential carry over to my weak area
  • My strong area can be used as a buffer to minimize risk (i.e. potentially use ad revenue from one to pay for ads for the other)
  • Focusing on my strength is aligned to something I enjoy, so it won’t feel forced to work on it

Double Down Summary

While this may not make sense to do all the time, I think the timing works really well for me. I’m going to write a follow up to discuss particular examples of how I plan to execute this and how they relate to building the brand for my vehicle.

Can you think of any areas that you can double down in to improve another area in your life?


Timur Kernel on 2013 Nexus 7 WiFi (flo)

Timur Kernel on 2013 Nexus 7 WiFi (flo)

Background on Timur’s Kernel

I got fed up with having a pretty crummy head unit in my 2012 Audi TT RS (named Ignantt), and decided that it was time to take matters into my own hands. Part of doing a Nexus 7 head unit install in a vehicle involves powering the tablet up with a USB on-the-go (OTG) cable and being able to not only power the device but also plug in USB devices into the tablet to use. In order to get this working, everyone seems to be relying on this kernel from Timur. As per Timur’s site:

This feature allows you to connect one or more USB slave devices to your tablet and charge it at the same time. This allows you, say, to operate an external USB DAC without the tablet ever running out of power. To use this feature you will need an “OTG charging” – or a std. OTG adapter combined with a USB-Y cable.

Right-o. So yesterday evening after work I spent almost the entire night trying to get this going (aside from eating dinner and hitting the gym). I really feel that this should have been significantly easier for me, and when I reflect on how the whole thing went down, the actual process IS actually easy… It’s just that there are a few points where if you deviate slightly based on your device, EVERYTHING stops working. With that said:

This guide is for ASUS Google Nexus 7 Tablet (7-Inch, 16 GB, Black) 2013 Model only (Android 5.1.1 build LMY48G). It can be adapted to work with other models, I’m sure, but I plan to explicitly call out where my missteps where so that anyone with the exact same hardware as me can have a smoother ride. I also take ABSOLUTELY NO RESPONSIBILITY if you brick your device.

Step-by-Step

  1. Make a folder somewhere on your computer (like your desktop) that you are going to put all of your downloads into.
  2. Make sure you have ADB and FastBoot on your path, OR you put all of the necessary files to run ADB and FastBoot from a command prompt into the folder you made in step 1.
  3. You’re going to need to unlock your bootloader if you haven’t already. Unlocking your bootloader WILL erase your device. Follow the steps outlined here. In short, these steps are:
    1. Enable USB debugging on the device
    2. Open a command prompt in your folder from step 1
    3. Type: adb reboot bootloader
    4. Press enter to execute the command
    5. Wait for the device to boot into the bootloader…
    6. Type: fastboot oem unlock
    7. Press enter to execute the command
    8. Use the volume buttons on the device to change selection to Yes
    9. Use the power button on the device to select Yes
    10. Unlocked!
  4. You’re going to need to flash a new stock ROM to your device. Timur doesn’t call out LMY48G as supported in his instructions, but LMY48T is!) so go to Factory Images for Nexus Devices and download the image for 5.1.1 (LMY48T).
  5. Extract the contents of the LMY48T tar.gz file into your folder from step 1.
  6. Run the flash-all.bat file that was extracted from the LMY48T download. When this completes successfully, you will have a phone in a brand new state…
    1. Follow all the instructions on the device to get set up again with your new factory ROM
    2. Go to “About tablet” in settings and check that build number is now LMY48T… If it’s not, then DO NOT CONTINUE. You’ll need to get LMY48T before continuing with these steps.
    3. Follow all the steps again to get USB debugging available again
  7. You’re going to need to flash a recovery onto your device next. I used TWRP for this. HOWEVER, not just any TWRP worked for me. I needed to use the “multirom” version of TWRP (specifically, I used TWRP_multirom_flo_20150328).
    1. Download the TWRP multirom image to your folder created in step 1
    2. Put your phone into bootloader mode by typing: adb reboot bootloader
    3. Press enter to execute the command
    4. Wait for your phone to enter bootloader mode
    5. Type: fastboot flash recovery TWRP_multirom_flo_20150328.img
    6. NOTE: if you did not download the EXACT same TWRP as me, then change it to the correct file name…
    7. Press enter to execute the command. The device should inform you that flashing worked.
    8. Use the volume buttons on the device to change selection to booting to recovery
    9. Use the power button to select boot to recovery
    10. … You should see the TWRP splash as you boot to recovery
    11. Wait for this to load
  8. You’re almost there!
  9. We need to grab the timur files now. I was a little thrown off when navigating the FTP, but you only need TWO files: the host and the services files.
    1. Download timur-services-N7-2-511e-v3-2015-10-06.zip (or whatever the latest version of services is with 511-e is) into your folder created in step 1
    2. Download timur-usbhost-flo511-v3.0-2015-10-20.zip (or whatever the latest version of usbhost is with flo511 is) into your folder created in step 1
    3. We need to push these two files to the device’s internal SDCARD, so…
    4. NOTE: please use the correct file names in the following commands if yours are different…
    5. Type: adb push timur-services-N7-2-511e-v3-2015-10-06.zip /sdcard/
    6. Press enter to push the file… ADB should tell you if it worked.
    7. Type: adb push timur-usbhost-flo511-v3.0-2015-10-20.zip /sdcard/
    8. Press enter to push the file… ADB should tell you if it worked.
  10. On the device, press the big “install” button on the main part of the TWRP recovery
  11. Add both zips that you pushed to the device (remember, they are in the /SDCARD/ folder and you’ll need to make sure TWRP is filtering by zips)
  12. Flash ’em…
  13. Use TWRP to reboot… mine prompted me to install supersu. I opted for YES.
  14. As the phone is booting up, it may say some stuff about optimizing apps… If it does this for forever and then reboots and keeps doing this again for forever, it’s very likely that you mismatched the timur files… I encountered this problem twice and had to reflash the correct stock ROM again… so head back to step 1 🙂
  15. Once the phone boots up, go to about tablet under settings and check your kernel… It should say timur in there!
  16. If you saw timur in step 15… You’ve done it!

NOTE: If anyone goes through this guide and wants to suggest clarifications, please comment and I’ll try to update it.

Gotchas

  • I had to use the correct version of TWRP (the multiboot one) to get anywhere with this. I tried latest releases of CWM and TWRP but neither could seem to mount my system partition when doing the zip installs. This was incredibly frustrating and probably chewed up around two to three hours of my time debugging. I tried rooting etc… Nothing would fix it. The ONLY thing that seemed to work was TWRP multiboot.
  • My first pass through getting timur kernel installed resulted in a bootloop, which was super frustrating. Timur called out specific builds of Android that his kernel works for, and even though LMY48G wasn’t listed, I guess at which files to use and it failed miserably. Lesson learned. This is why i suggested flashing one of the supported stock Android images RIGHT at the beginning. If you don’t get everything lined up (and he’s explicit about this… I was just being dumb) then you will very likely encounter problems and need to redo everything.

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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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