Tag: Jeff Haden

Article Dump #24 – Weekly Article Dump

Article Dump #24 - Dev Leader (Image by http://www.sxc.hu)

Article Dump #24

Welcome to the 24th issue of my (nearly) weekly article dumps. I don’t have a theme or an update this week, so it’s kept pretty short. I hope you find the following articles interesting though! Leave me a comment if you have any opinions on these

Articles

  • The 7 Values That Drive IDEO: In this article, the CEO of IDEO Tim Brown talks about the various values that his organization embraces to have a creative culture. Some of the ideas in the slides seem really high level or like generic fluff, but try thinking about what they would mean in your organization. It’s one thing to glance at IDEO’s list and say “Yeah, yeah… That’s nice…” but when you actually think about how that fits in with your organization, you might actually realize you don’t embody those values. Do you learn from failure? Does your organization promote an ask for forgiveness not permission approach? Would this make sense in your organization? Just some food for thought, but I thought a lot of these values were interesting to think about and how embracing them might change the organization I work in.
  • The 15 Most Annoying Coworkers of All Time: Ilya Pozin put together a pretty funny article on different types of coworkers you’ll encounter in your career. I got worried that I might be #13 on the list… The office comedian who isn’t actually funny. Apparently this post got a lot of flack in the comments on LinkedIn. I guess people were expecting a really serious article on how to deal with these different types of problems in the workplace. I didn’t really have expectations when I read it, aside from not wanting to find myself on the list. Maybe the main take away point here is… don’t annoy your colleagues!
  • Companies Frustrate Innovative Employees: Gijs van Wulfen takes a different perspective on innovation. So many people now are writing about embracing failure (so far as you learn from it). I’m actually a big believer in that approach–take controlled risks and learn from things that don’t go as expected. Gijs’ perspective is a little bit different: forget embracing failure; boost the innovation effectiveness rate! Gijs goes through a workflow for trying to improve innovation at various steps in the process. Pretty interesting!
  • Your Boss is Happier Than You (But Shouldn’t Be): Jeff Haden tells us something we probably all (let’s say in the majority of circumstances) know: your boss is happier than you. Big surprise right? They get to make decisions, have fewer bosses than you, and they make more money. Sounds like a good reason to be happier, no? But if your boss is happier than you, those probably aren’t the exact reasons. Your superiors are likely happier than you because of autonomy. They get a bit more freedom to do accomplish goals in their own way. Jeff has a big list of reasons why your boss is probably happier… and none of them are about money.
  • When is it a Good Idea to write Bad Code?: Rejoice in the first programming article for this week! Tech debt. Ever heard of it? If not, it’s not likely that you’ve never encountered it in your programming career. I’d wager at least one of the last handful of big features you implemented in your code base either had to deal with some tech debt or perhaps even introduced some tech debt. Brad Carleton has put together a big list of different types of tech debt and what they mean in your project. I highly suggest you read it if your a programmer. There’s a lot of things to be aware of with tech debt but it’s important to remember that tech debt isn’t always the worst thing that could happen. Sometimes it’s okay to sacrifice a sub-par design now in order to get some software out the door. Your users might try it out and decide they don’t like the functionality anyway, and you’d end up re-writing it again!
  • “Happiness” vs “Meaningfulness” — The Surprising DifferenceAlex Banayan‘s article discusses the difference between happiness and meaningfulness. It appears as though often happiness and meaningfulness are not necessarily aligned. For example, it might be easy to chase a life of happiness that lacks meaning, or dedicate your life to something meaningful but not be very happy while doing it. The real question is, is it possible to achieve a balance where you’re leading a fulfilling life that keeps you happy? Alex talks briefly about five different categories and how each can sway to something more meaningful or something that provides more happiness. Are you living a happy and fulfilling life? Do you have to balance these five categories carefully?

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Be a Better Programmer – Weekly Article Dump

Be a Better Programmer - Weekly Article Dump (Image by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Be a Better Programmer

It’s a new year and that means it’s all about resolutions, right? Well, I’m not a huge fan of keeping around a resolution that needs to wait for a new year, but I am a fan of reflecting on your goals and your skills. If you’re a programmer like me, then maybe this will be a great starting point. In my weekly article dumps I usually would just provide a couple of comments on a link like this, but I felt I should dive in a little bit more. You can find the original article by Amy Jollymore over here. Please have a look! I shared it with the whole dev team at Magnet Forensics because I felt there was a little bit of something for everyone.

Number one on this list, and perhaps the one I’d personally like to focus on more out of this list, is checking your code before blaming others. Blaming other people–in general, not just programming–is an easy way out. When a problem occurs, it’s simple to assume that all of your work is right and that it must be someone else’s fault. But if everyone starts thinking like this, it turns into a nasty blame war. So next time the build breaks or your shiny new feature stops working as expected, don’t go blaming other people. Investigate what the problem is. See what your most recent changes were and if they could have caused the problem. As you start to gain confidence that your changes aren’t responsible for the issue, try sitting down with one or two other people you think might have been around the problem area recently–But don’t go accusing them! Putting your heads together to figure out the problem can speed up the process and might even shed some light on some miscommunication over a design or some assumptions in the code that don’t actually hold true. It’s a lot more embarrassing to blame someone when it’s actually your fault compared to putting in the effort and admitting you might have goofed up. Try it out!

Number two is also a great item. You should never put an end to your learning… especially as an individual in a technology space. There are so many great suggestions listed for this point that there’s no point in me repeating them. Just go read them! An interesting point worth mentioning is using podcasts for learning. This is a great option if you find you’re brain is still spinning when you lay down in bed or if you have a long commute to work (or something else you’re involved in). The author also mentions that you don’t need to be learning programming… What about domain expertise? If you’re writing code for banks, lawyers, or digital forensics… Why  not learn about that too?!

The last point I’ll touch on from the article is number three: don’t be afraid to break things. I love this point. If you’re working on a big piece of software, there are almost certainly areas that seem brittle, scary, or just plain incomprehensible. If your project is still small, it very well get to this point. It doesn’t mean that the code is bad or that you’re working with the worst programmers… It’s just something that happens when you’re continuously trying to build on your software. The real problem occurs when nobody is willing to take the time to go change things. If you have big scary brittle parts of code, then set aside some time, take a deep breath, and go refactor it! It might seem like hell at first, but once you get into it (and especially after it’s done) you’ll feel a million times better. Plus, now your code can continue to be built upon without people running in fear when you mention that section of code. Code can get nasty, but consider using a “tech debt” system or regularly set aside time for refactoring parts of your code base.

Again, the original article is located at: 7 Ways to be a Better Programmer in 2014. Check it out!

Articles

  • How to Manage Dynamic Tensions — and Master the Balancing Act: This was an interesting article on some parts of leadership that often oppose each other. Author Chris Cancialosi does an excellent job in discussing balance between internal and external influences as well as leading and managing. A good take away from this article is at least acknowledging that there are certainly some things to balance. You may want to have the most flexible team, but have you considered if there’s a “too flexible”? Just a bit of perspective that this article might bring to light.
  • A Crash Course In Leadership For 20-Something CEOs: Barry Salzberg‘s article is geared toward young CEOs, but I think that means we can apply the lessons to anyone looking to lead! A few of the points I’d like to mention include being tough on problems and not on people. Your people are the one’s who are going to solve problems and bring great ideas to the table. They’ll invest their time into your organization in order to accomplish great things–so don’t be hard on them. Instead, acknowledge that your problems and challenges are the things you want to crush, and work with your team to make sure you conquer every challenge that gets in the way of your goal. Another point is on taking risks. Never taking risks is a great way to stagnate. You need to learn from your failures, but keep pushing the boundaries. Finally, be ready to adapt. As your organization grows or as the market you’re working within evolves, you need to be ready to adapt and change. You might get lucky and things don’t change all that much over a long period of time, but the odds of that are pretty low. Be ready to adapt so when the time comes, you don’t need to worry about everything falling apart.
  • Leading at Scale with Agility: Brad Smith has a few great points on what leading a team should encompass. First, a team should have a goal that it is trying to achieve. If that team is part of a larger organization, the team’s goal should align with the goal of the entire organization. Secondly, decisions for the team should involve those on the team. It’s easy to sit back and speculate what might be best, but why not involve the people directly affected? Of course, this is more difficult for large teams but maybe that’s an indication your teams would be more effective if they were smaller. Next, empower teams to arrive at solutions on their own. If a plan worked out well, try communicating it to others to try out. Conversely, if the plan had some problems, let others on the team (or other teams) know about the hurdles. Finally, Brad has a point on trust. Trust is arguably one of the most important parts of leading a team. Each team member needs to be able to trust the others. There should be an easy assumption that everyone is operating with best intentions.
  • For Leaders, Today is History: In this article by Steven Thompson, he gives a high-level overview of his focus. Specifically, he focuses on the future and not right now. Steven says the teams he is in charge of are often looking at the problems of “right now” and perhaps a little bit in the future. It would be counter productive for him to try and butt-in to try helping with those problems because he’s so far removed from them. Instead, those individuals have been empowered to focus on those problems. Instead, Steven focuses on the future–the direction of the teams. As a leader, it’s important to try and be thinking at least one step ahead.
  • What If You Had to Write a “User Manual” About Your Leadership Style?: After I read Adam Bryant‘s article, I thought the idea of a leadership “user manual” would be pretty cool. Even if there isn’t a single other individual who would benefit from it, at least it would help reveal to myself some of my leadership quirks. That’s useful on it’s own! I’ll be sure to post up my leadership “user manual” when I have it complete… and I imagine I’ll have to keep updating it over time as my style evolves. It’ll be really interesting to see the evolution of my leadership style! Why not consider doing one for yourself?
  • What Bosses Should Never Ask Employees to Do: Jeff Haden‘s article was a little bit controversial in my opinion–and in the opinion of some of the commenters. I think I get the underlying message behind a lot of what Jeff is saying for each of his points, but as one commenter said, it sounds like a bit of a personal complaint the whole way through. Consider the topic of donating to charities at work. The feel I get after reading that segment is that your organization should not attempt to do fundraising through employees. While I don’t actually think that’s what Jeff is saying, that’s how I feel after reading it. I know that we’ve been able to do several charity events at Magnet, and we’ve always said that they are completely voluntary. I think that’s the crucial part. It’s the holiday season and your budget is a bit tight? How could anyone get mad at you for backing out of a completely optional charity donation? Busy with some personal matters or want to focus on finishing up something at work the day we’re doing a charity event? No big deal, it’s optional. Anyway, the point is that perhaps based on the wording in the article, I felt like some of the messaging will be misinterpreted. I think there are some good points buried in there. Check it out and let me know if you agree or not!

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Happy Holidays – Weekly Article Dump

Happy Holidays – Weekly Article Dump

Happy Holidays

The holiday season is upon us, so I’d like to start by extending my best wishes for you to have a safe and happy holiday. I’ve personally been pretty busy the past few weeks wrapping year-end stuff up at work, so I’m looking forward to a few days of being able to catch my breath a bit. If you have some time off from work, I’m hoping you’ll get a chance to do the same over the holidays. I can’t sit idle for too long though. I don’t like not feeling productive, so once I’ve caught up a bit on some well deserved rest, I’ll be right back at it!

The holidays and end of the year are a great time to reflect on everything that’s happened in the last 12 months. Did you have goals that set you set and accomplished? What about things that you didn’t get to achieve or complete? Were you able to assist others in their goals? Maybe a year is too long for you to wait between points of reflection, but the holiday season provides the perfect opportunity for you to reflect–it’s at the end of the year, and generally you get some time off from your day-to-day!

At Magnet Forensics, we had a year-end review celebration and planning for next year. This was an incredible eye-opener for a lot of the amazing things we did this year. In fact, this last year was filled with so many exciting moments for our company that I thought around half of them were things that occurred in 2012. I was mistaken though. We’ve just been doing that much. I’m incredibly proud of the entire team and what we’ve been able to accomplish.

For my personal growth, this year certainly covered a lot of ground. I was able to work on some new exciting technologies like I had set goals for, and I had actually managed to take on more responsibilities in the workplace while reducing my perceived workload. I’m proud of what I’ve accomplished, but I’ve also been able to identify a few areas that I’d like to improve in the new year. I don’t want to call it my “New Year Resolution” for fear of it never coming to fruition, but I think by acknowledging some areas I l’d like to improve I’m setting myself up to be constantly aware of them.

Try to get some personal reflection in this holiday season. Celebrate what you’ve accomplished and raise the bar even higher for next year!

Articles

I missed an update last week, so I’ll combine both of my smaller article summaries into one!

  • How One Company Replaced Meetings And Bureaucracy With Pairs, Ceremonies, And Storytelling: When I shared this article by Drake Baer on social media, I mentioned that there was one of the three suggestions that I felt might not be met as well. Any guesses yet?

    The first suggestion in the list is working in pairs. The notion of working in pairs has some popularity in programming (i.e. Pair Programming) because you get two sets of eyes and two brains behind tackling the same problem. Partners get rotated every-so-often and you can share knowledge really well this way.

    The second suggestion was about story telling. Story telling really let’s a company philosophy or mission get spread through the organization in a natural way. This also works for receiving customer  perspective and diffusing it as requirements from the user.

    The final idea presented in the article was regarding ritualization. Taking potentially boring or inefficient meetings and transforming them into rituals can provide more meaning and structure to them.

    If you haven’t guessed yet, I figured item #1 may be met with some resistance. I personally don’t enjoy pairing past the point of brain storming ideas together. After that, it feels inefficient to me. I also believe that certain individuals have a “comfort zone” for where they feel efficient in their work. So even if pairing works well for 95% of people (let’s pretend) then for that other 5% it might really be disruptive for them. I’m starting to learn that applying practices uniformly across a team often doesn’t make sense.

  • Some Workaholics Have More Fun: A quick one from Hiroshi Mikitani, but still very worth mentioning in my opinion. When people think of a workaholic, it’s often associated with a negative perspective. But maybe it’s not so black and white. Would you say there’s a difference between someone driven by external factors (e.g. meet deadlines for the boss, make more money, etc…) or someone driven by  internal factors (e.g. create something innovative, help or make a difference in the world, etc…)? I’m not claiming that these can never overlap or anything, but perhaps it’s just a bit of a perspective tweak. Take it or leave it 🙂

  • The Art of Listening: In this article by Gurbaksh Chahal, he touches on some really important aspects of listening. And yes, while listening is definitely important in the workplace, you can likely apply his principles to other areas in life. First, you want to engage people and let them know you’re actually listening. This can be conveyed will by eye contact and body language. For me, I like to lock my computer and turn to people when they come up to talk. It’s the perfect way to let them know they have my undivided attention. The next step is actively listening. Stop thinking of your response while someone is talking. Try actually listening to the speaker the entire time and interpret their words. There are no rules that say you’re not allowed to pause for thought to formulate your response when the other person is done talking! Gurbaksh has a few more pointers, and I strongly suggest you check out his article.
  • 8 Ways Using Humor Will Make You a Better Leader: I’m a big fan of using humour in the workplace, but sometimes I’m not sure if I use it effectively or take things to far. That’s why I always jump to these humour-in-the-workplace articles when they pop up. In this article by Kevin Daum, there are two key points I wanted to address. The first is that humour really does help disarm tense situations. Sometimes there are difficult situations at work, and using humour (properly) can really help break the ice. Of course, you still need to take caution that the humour you’re using isn’t going to make the situation worse. The second point is that humour helps build a bonded community. I think humour can have a similar impact to story telling in an organization when it’s used effectively. You can always related back to “inside jokes” when you were dealing with some high pressure times, some bad code, or just because something funny came up at work. You can always bring the newbies into the inside jokes too and make them feel completely welcome.
  • The 8-Hour Workday Doesn’t Really Work: If you feel like the typical eight hour work day really isn’t your thing… You might not be alone. Jeff Haden put together this pretty informative article about workdays and productivity you might find interesting. There’s tons of ground covered, including a few tips at the end for how you can optimize our work day. For example, try focusing on four or five things in a day that take up 90 minute slots. Certainly worth the read if you’re looking to hack your work-day.
  • The Hidden Danger of Success:  Another little article from Hiroshi Mikitani. So often we’re told to learn from our failures. But how are we supposed to learn from our successes? Hiroshi suggests we treat them equally. Sure, celebrate your success, but make sure you have take-away learnings from each of your successes. Don’t let them get to your head and always stay humble!
  • Keys to Resolving Conflict: Jim Sniechowski dives into some great points in resolving conflict. I think it’s a decent read for anyone who has ever been in some sort of debate or conflict. I imagine that’s most people! Anyway, two great points to start you off: Each side of the conflict needs to understand that there’s a mutual agreement that needs to be met and willingness to accept some of the other side is necessary for coming to a positive conclusion.
  • Four Principles to Inspire Innovation: Lockheed Martin’s CEO Marillyn Hewson provides four of her principles for innovation. Firstly, ensure there’s an environment that can cultivate innovation. Next, don’t treat innovation differently depending on the source. The final two principles I like to think of as one really. You want to innovate with a mission or goal that inspires and is driven by the values your organization embraces.

Please have a safe holiday season, but remember to relax and have a bit of fun too! Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week. Thanks!


Deloitte Companies to Watch – Weekly Article Dump

Deloitte Companies to Watch - Weekly Article Dump

Deloitte Companies to Watch

Another impressive accolade for Magnet Forensics! Deloitte has placed Magnet on their top 10 companies to watch list! To qualify for the list, the companies need to be operating for less than five years, be based out of Canada, and put a large portion of their revenue to generating intellectual property. Our CEO, Adam Belsher, had this to say about the award:

“We are honoured to be named one of Deloitte’s Companies-to-Watch. This award recognizes the hard work and dedication of our team. We’re thankful for the success we’ve achieved, and we’re incredibly proud to be contributing to the important work done by our customers who use our solutions to fight crime, enhance public safety, protect companies from fraud and theft, and ensure workplace safety and respect for their employees.”

Magnet Forensics Press & Events

The event was put together very well. It was great to be able to interact with individuals from the other companies and share success stories. I even had a chance to meet up with Stephen Lake of Thalmic Labs and have a good chat with him. I’m going to name-drop him everywhere I go because he’s my old university room/house mate! He also happens to be a incredible person that if you have the chance to meet, you absolutely should. Here’s some coverage on twitter of us talking with our founder Jad Saliba:

We enjoyed the whole night, and we were grateful for Deloitte putting on the event. The entire Magnet team is very proud of our achievements.

Articles

  • What comes first: employee engagement or great work?: A short but interesting article on employee engagement. The author claims that most employees probably start of at their position very motivated and engaged. Over time, an employees engagement drops if their leaders are not proactive in keeping their engagement levels up. By proactively acknowledging the success of your employees, you can keep your team engaged and producing great work.
  • Great Leadership Starts and Ends with This: Jeff Haden put together this quick little article about an answer an audience member gave about what the key to leading people is. Caring. Overly simplified? Well, the individual went on to say that regardless of all of your strategies, plans, and experience, if you can’t prove that you truly care about your team then they aren’t going to buy in. I’m never one to buy into something so absolute, but the takeaway for me is that team members cannot be looked at entirely as resources. Sure, the people on your team affect productivity and in that sense are resources, but forgetting to acknowledge the human side of things is a recipe for failure.
  • 9 Ways to Win Employee Trust: In his article, Geoffrey James put together a great list of nine things to help build trust with your team. I wouldn’t say these are groundbreaking things, but it’s important to be reminded about them. Try reflecting on his list and seeing if you actually do the things you think you do. You might be surprised. Some of the top things on the list for me are ensuring employees’ success is number one on your priorities, listen more than you talk, and walk the walk. Great list!
  • Lambdas: An Example in Refactoring Code: I put out this programming article earlier this week and had some great feedback. In this article, I talk about a real world example of how using lambda expressions in C# really helped when refactoring a piece of code. Some people have never heard of lambdas, and some people seem to hate them. In this case for me, it greatly simplified a set of code and reduced a bunch of extra classes. I definitely owe it to myself to start investigating them a little bit more.
  • Executive Coaching: Bringing Out Greater Leadership: This article is all about taking charge with your leadership. Judith Sherven talks about executive coaching for leaders, but the main points I see in here are around confidence. If you aren’t confident in your ability to lead, motivate, and inspire how can you expect anyone else to be? It ends up becoming a tough balance, because you need to listen and take feedback from your team, but when you make decisions you should do so with confidence.
  • Stop Worrying About Making the Right Decision: Ever heard of paralysis by analysis? This article does a great job of explaining why you shouldn’t let that creep in to your leadership approach. It’s important to make good decisions–there’s no doubt about that. But the reality is that no matter what decision you make, there are certain unknowns that can creep in and potentially have a huge effect on the choices you’ve made. So what’s more important: making the perfect decision, or being able to adapt effectively?
  • Appraising Performance Appraisal: Steven Sinofsky‘s article is a bit of a beast, but it’s a great starting point if you’re reconsidering performance appraisals. Even if you’re totally content with your performance review system, it might be worth reading to spark some ideas. Steven does a great job of pointing out some common pitfalls of typical performance appraisal systems and comments on some things you really need to try and understand before sticking to any one system. I’m not well enough versed in the performance review and/or human resources side of things, but this article certainly has enough to get you questioning the common approaches.
  • Tab Fragment Tutorial: Shameless plug for my Android application that I put out on the Google Play store. It’s the end result of the tutorial I wrote up over here. I think it’s going to blow past my legitimate application for converting units!
  • Does a Good Leader Have To Be Tough?: Deepak Chopra has some seriously great articles. In this article, he analyzes the pros and cons of being a “tough” leader. In short, there are positive takeaways from being a tough leader, but there are a lot of negative aspects to it. Deepak suggests you consider a different approach from tough-soft leadership. By focusing on a hierarchy of needs to be a successful leader, toughness is only one aspect of leadership. A pretty solid read, like all of Deepak’s articles.

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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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