Tag: MonoBehavior

Stitching – Combining Unity3D And Autofac

Stitching - Combining Unity3D And Autofac

Before We Talk About Stitching…

In Unity3D, the scripts we write and attach to GameObjects inherit from a base class called MonoBehaviour (and yes, that says Behaviour with a U in it, not the American spelling like Behavior… Just a heads up). MonoBehaviour instances can be attached to GameObjects in code by calling the AddComponent method, which takes a type parameter or type argument, and returns the new instance of the attached MonoBehaviour that it creates.

This API usage means that:

  • We cannot attach existing instances of a MonoBehaviour to a GameObject
  • Unity3D takes care of instantiating MonoBehaviours for us (thanks Unity!)
  • … We can’t pass parameters into the constructor of a MonoBehaviour because Unity3D only handles parameterless constructors (boo Unity!)

So what’s the problem with that? It kind of goes against some design patterns I’m a big fan of, where you pass your object’s dependencies in via the constructor. You can read my little primer about constructor parameter passing, dependency injection, and Autofac to learn more.

The challenge I’m trying to address is that my non-MonoBehaviour classes are all going to be setup to use constructor parameter passing as much as possible but the MonoBehaviour classes cannot. So I’d like to reduce the amount of disjoint coding styles as much as I can and make the MonoBehaviour classes feel like the rest of my stuff!

What Is “Stitching”?

Here’s where this little pattern I created called “Stitching” comes into play. Stitching involves using a class referred to as a Stitcher that’s single purpose is to take parameters in via a constructor, and wire them up to either public properties or public fields (but I REALLY suggest using properties) on the MonoBehaviour that we instantiate through the GameObject.AddComponent() API.

The code ends up looking something like this:

public sealed class MyComponentStitcher
{
  private readonly IDependency _dependency;

  public MyComponentStitcher(IDependency dependency)
  {
    // take in our dependencies and save them as fields
    _dependency = dependency;
  }

  public MyComponent Stitch(GameObject gameObject)
  {
    // create the MonoBehaviour instance using the Unity3D API
    var componentInstance = gameObject.AddComponent<MyComponent>();

    // wire up our dependencies (assign our field to a property on the component)
    componentInstance.Dependency = _dependency;

    return componentInstance;
  }
}

Where you can see that:

  • We inject dependencies into the Stitcher’s constructor
  • We call AddComponent() with the component type we want on the object we want to “stitch” to
  • We mutate the component
  • We return the newly made component

How Do We Use Stitching In Practice?

Now that we see the pattern for a how a Stitcher works, how do we actually use Stitching in practice? Let’s start by using another example:

public sealed class SomeClass
{
  private readonly IMyComponentStitcher _stitcher;

  public SomeClass(IMyComponentStitcher stitcher)
  {
    _stitcher = stitcher;
  }

  public void MyMethod()
  {
    // create a new Unity3D game object
    var gameObject = new GameObject("My Game Object");

    // "stitch" our 
    var myComponent = _stitcher.Stitch(gameObject);

    // we can use some information that would have been injected into the constructor
    // this should print the injected value
    Debug.Log(myComponent.InjectedInfo);
  }
}

From this, you can see that:

  • We have a class called MyClass following our constructor parameter passing paradigm
  • The method MyMethod()
    • Creates a new game object
    • Adds a MyComponent instance to our game object by calling the Stitch() method
    • Using our imagination and the example above, pretend our Stitcher implementation takes a parameter in its constructor to assign to the InjectedInfo property of of MonoBehaviour
  • Logs out the value of the InjectedInfo property found on our newly created instance

So What Makes Stitching Better?

You might feel like this is extra code right now, but this is where the power of Autofac comes into play. You can read my article about using Autofac with Unity3D for more information.

By creating a Stitcher, we can register it to our Autofac container. The Autofac container will then resolve any dependencies that our Stitcher requires for us. The net effect of this is that when we Stitch MonoBehaviours to GameObjects, we get what feels like Autofac resolving dependencies for our MonoBeaviours. We don’t need to mutate MonoBehaviour fields/properties all over our code to assign the dependencies the script needs to use. Instead, we treat the Stitcher class like a factory for our MonoBehaviour.

So in summary:

  • Stitching allows us to leverage Autofac for instantiating MonoBehaviours
  • Stitcher classes essentially become a factory class for our MonoBehaviours (with the side effect that they *must* mutate the GameObject that we need to attach the MonoBehaviour to)
  • Allows assignment of MonoBehaviour fields/properties for initialization to exist in one spot so we can put the bad object mutating code in one spot that feels hidden

Using Autofac With Unity3D

Autofac With Unity

Why Consider Using Autofac With Unity3D?

I think using a dependency injection framework is really valuable when you’re building a complex application, and in my opinion, a game built in Unity is a great example of this. Using Autofac with Unity3D doesn’t need to be a special case. I wrote a primer for using Autofac, and in it I discuss reasons why it’s valuable and some of the reasons you’d consider switching to using a dependency container framework. Now it doesn’t need to be Autofac, but I love the API and the usability, so that’s my weapon of choice.

Building a game can result in many complex systems working together. Not only that, if you intend to build many games it’s a great opportunity to refactor code into different libraries for re-usability. If we’re practicing writing good code using constructor dependency passing with interfaces, then things really start to line up in favour of using a dependency injection framework.

Getting Set Up

At the end of my autofac primer article, I provided a link to the Nuget package for Autofac. You’ll notice that there’s a version dependency for .NET 4.5, so if you’re not sure how to get Unity3D working with .NET 4.5, you’ll want to check this other article of mine. It’s very simple, so don’t worry!

Unity3D, at the time of writing this and using version 2018.1.1f1, there’s no native Nuget package support. I haven’t spent too much time investigating alternatives, but not to worry. I’ll explain a quick work around. The TL;DR is that we need the binaries from the Nuget package to be loaded up by Unity3D and we’ll miss out on the Nuget-y-ness for now. Not a huge deal since we’ll still have Autofac support!

  • Start a new Visual Studio C# project
    • Ensure that the .NET framework is at least 4.5 and more specifically, the version of .NET that you’d like to use in your Unity3D project
  • Open up the Nuget package manager in Visual Studio
  • Search for Autofac online in the package manager (it should be the same one I referred to above!)
  • Add this package to your visual studio project
  • Compile this visual studio project
  • Assuming you built in debug, go to the output folder (which is in bindebug if you didn’t change anything from default)
  • In the output folder, you’ll find “Autofac.dll”
  • You’ll want to add this into your Unity3D project’s “Assets” folder
    • I like nice folder hierarchies, so I’d suggest making a subfolder inside of “Assets” called “Third Party” or “Dependencies”… Something that’s obvious for what it means
    • Drop in the Autofac.dll file into there
  • Unity3D will add a corresponding *.meta file to go along with this

Great! We’re almost there. If you want to test it out, open up a script from Unity3D. This will launch a new Visual Studio instance if you haven’t opened up one for your Unity project yet. At the very top of your file you should be able to type:

using Autofac;

And the namespace should resolve! If not, sometimes this takes Unity3D a refresh operation to regenerate the project file on disc, so if you switch to Unity3D again and it starts doing some processing, switching back to Visual Studio might resolve this.

Using Autofac With Unity3D

Up until this point, we’ve proven we can reference Autofac. I’m not going to explain all the ins and outs for how you’ll want to organize your Autofac initialization in this post, but we can walk through a quick example!

  • Pick a game object on your scene
  • Add a new C# script to it
    • Call it whatever you’d like, but make sure you know how to open it
  • … now go open it in Visual Studio 🙂
  • We should have a method in there called Start()
    • If not, feel free to add it:
    • private void Start()
      {
        // TODO: we'll add stuff here
      }
  • Let’s use this code to make a new class that you can put inside the same script file for now:
    • public sealed class MyAutofacObject
      {
      
        public MyAutofacObject()
        {
          Debug.Log("Constructor for our object!");
        }
      
        public void DoThing()
        {
          Debug.Log("Test!");
        }
      }
  • Inside this start method, let’s try doing something VERY simple to prove Autofac works!
    • var containerBuilder = new Autofac.ContainerBuilder();
      containerBuilder.RegisterType<MyAutofacObject>().SingleInstance();
      
      var container = containerBuilder.Build()
      var instance = container.Resolve<MyAutofacObject>();
      
      instance.DoThing();

Now if we run our game, here’s what should happen:

  • The script attached to the game object should run
  • The Start() method on the script should be the first thing that goes
  • The code we added should:
    • Make a new ContainerBuilder
    • Register our MyAutofacObject type as a single instance
    • Build the container
    • Resolve an instance of our type
    • Log out a message saying it’s in the constructor
    • Log out a message that says Test!

And voila! It’s simple, but it should demonstrate that Autofac is working!

Next Steps

This is a very contrived example of using Autofac with Unity3D. It proves that the code can be run, but it doesn’t do too much that’s useful. There are going to be many considerations you’ll need to make for how you want to organize your dependencies, register your classes/interfaces, and so on.

I’ll continue to add into this Unity3D series of posts, but let me know what else you’d like to know about using Autofac with Unity3D! I’d be happy to try and answer, or even create an article to help explain.

Thanks!


  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

    Verified Services

    View Full Profile →

  • Copyright © 1996-2010 Dev Leader. All rights reserved.
    Jarrah theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress