Tag: Programming

Should My Method Do This? Should My Class?

Whose Job Is It?

I wanted to share my experience that I had working on a recent project. If you’ve been programming for a while, you’ve definitely heard of the single responsibility principle. If you’re new to programming, maybe this is news. The principle states:

That every class should have responsibility over a single part of the functionality provided by the software, and that responsibility should be entirely encapsulated by the class

You could extend this concept to apply to not only classes, but methods as well. Should you have that one method that is entirely responsible for creating a database connection, connecting to a web service, downloading data, updating the database, uploading some data, and then doing some user interface rendering? What would you even call that?!

The idea is really this: break down your code into separate pieces of functionality.

Easier Said Than Done… Or Is It?

The idea seems easy, right? Then why is it that people keep writing code that doesn’t follow this guideline? I’m guessing it’s because even though it’s an easy rule, it’s even easier to just… code what works.

The recent experience I wanted to share was my work on a project that has a pretty short time frame to prove it was feasible. It was starting something from scratch, so I had all the flexibility in the world to design code however I wanted to. I really made an effort to keep asking myself this one question: Whose job is it?

Every time I asked that question and found that it was not my current method’s responsibility, I would ask “Is this class really responsible for that”? I’d either go make myself a new method in my class or I’d just go immediately make a new class with a single method on it. It seemed like a bit of extra overhead each time I had to do it, but was it worth it in the end?

Absolutely. After the project had proven itself and development continued on, I was easily able to refactor code (where necessary) and mock out functionality in my coded tests. Instead of trying to write test setup code that required a whack of classes I needed to initialize, I could mock out a couple of interfaces and test with ease. It was also really obvious which pieces were responsible for what functionality.

Final Thoughts

If you want to get better at following the single responsibility principle, I think it starts with one question: Whose job is it? Try it out!


Multiple C# Projects In Your Unity 3D Solution

Unity

Problem: Visual Studio and Unity Aren’t Playing Nice!

Disclaimer: I develop on Windows, so I have no idea if any of this even applies to other operating systems. I assume not. Sorry.

I just started poking around in Unity 4.6 and I’ve been having a blast. I’ve made it to the point where I want to actually start hammering out some code, but I came across a bit of a problem: I want to start leveraging other projects I’ve written in my Unity solution while I’m in Visual Studio, and things are blowing up. So, what gives?

Okay, so let me start by explaining why I want to do this. I understand that if I’m making a simple game, I should have no problem breaking out my unity scripts into sub folders and organizing them to be nice and pretty. The problem I’m encountering is that I have existing projects under source control and I don’t want to copy and paste all of the code as scripts into my Unity folder. I also want to be able to create re-usable code for my future games, so I’d like to start breaking things out into libraries as I see fit.

So, if you’ve been playing around in Unity for a bit, you might say “Oh, well you’re a dummy! Unity can totally leverage your C# DLLs once you drop them into your asset folder”! And you’d be 100% correct. But that’s not the workflow I want.

The underlying problem here is this: Unity will re-write your solution and project file when you flip between Unity and Visual Studio. But I’m sure they have it that way for a reason.

The Goal: Visual Studio and Unity Should… Play Nice!

My ideal state would be something like this:

  • Work in visual studio as much as I’d like to new projects to my solution, and reference them accordingly
  • Flip back and forth from Unity and Visual Studio without having to reset things to compile/run again
  • Build from visual studio and have things end up in the right spot… NOT copy DLLs
  • Not copy+paste my entire project(s) already under source control elsewhere

Is this something that can be achieved though? I was pretty determined that I should be able to do *something* to have this working. Could I get it perfect? I wasn’t sure… But I knew I could make it better.

The Solution: Give and Take with Unity

My *almost* perfect sution, which I’ll walk you through, is this: Leveraging Visual Studio tools for Unity, modify the Unity solution as you see fit and use directory junctions (symlinks) to the build output directories of other projects.

  1. Let’s get Visual Studio tools for Unity installed. Visit that link and download the version that you need for the version of Visual Studio that you use. After installing, I opened up my project within Unity and I had to import the Visual Studio Tools package.Import Package
    After selecting this menu item, I was presented with a dialog for picking the items to import. I left it as is.Import Package2After importing these items, I could see that Unity had successfully added these entries under my Assets folder. Okay, now we’re getting somewhere. Next up, I wanted to configure Unity to not modify my solution every time I go back and forth from Unity to Visual Studio. This is the part that kills whether or not I’ve added projects to my solution. For me, it’s critical to have code I’m working on immediately accessible so that I can jump back and forth between projects. Lucky for us, this part is pretty easy. Go to the menu to access your new Visual Studio Tools menu item:

    VS Tools Configure
    Selecting “Configuration” opens up a really simple dialog. Let’s make sure “Generate solution file” is unchecked! It’s that easy.

    VS Tools Configure2
    Once we have all of this setup, we should be able to go into Visual Studio and add other projects to our solution.

  2. The one thing that I *could not* get this solution to do is have Unity leave my main game project alone in Visual Studio. As a result, the rest of this walk through is allowing us to play by Unity’s rules. Unity is good at magically referencing all of the managed DLLs that you include within your assets folder. If you drop DLLs somewhere within “Assets” and switch to Visual Studio, Unity will likely have modified your main project to reference this DLL.My next step was creating a spot where I wanted to drop the build outputs of my extra projects I wanted to reference. In my Visual Studio solution, I have my original game project and some newly added projects I want to build from source. In Unity, I wanted these to end up in “Assets/Dependencies/bin”. No problem. Let’s make that folder structure (or your equivalent if you don’t like my naming):Bin Dependencies
    The next part is probably the “trickiest” part because it’s… well… unusual. You could technically stop here and manually copy DLLs back and forth, but I’m not about that life. I want things to happen automatically. For this, we’re going to use junction points. Browse to your newly created folder in an administrator command prompt. I say administrator because only certain users have permissions to create junction points. Your non-admin user might, but this is my “safe” way of instructing you. On the command prompt, we’re going to use “mklink” to create a junction. The command is “mlkink /D /J <NAME_OF_YOUR_PROJECT> <RELATIVE_PATH_TO_YOUR_PROJECT>”. For example, if you had a C# project you wanted to reference that was “MyCoolLibrary.csproj” and was located in the directory above your Unity project, you might use the command “mlkink /D /J MyCoolLibrary “……..MyCoolLibrarybindebug””. Note that I used two dots to go back up a directory several times (since we’re inside of AssetsDependenciesbin and want to get outside of our Unity project). you should get a success message when your junction is created.

    Repeat this step for as many extra projects as you want to include. You can always come back and add more projects this way too, or remove the junctions if you don’t want to include a project anymore.

    At this point, you’re technically done. If you build from Visual Studio, you should have your other projects’ DLLs end up in your Unity folder, and your main game project will be updated by Unity to reference these now!

  3. But… You’re not done if you use source control for your Unity project and have separate source control on your other projects. The scary thing here is that usually we don’t want our build outputs to be stored in source control… But if we do nothing else, your source control system will likely want to include the newly created “AssetsDependenciesbin” folder and any of the contents you’re building into there. I just modified my git ignore file (I’m sure there’s an equivalent for SVN or other source control) to exclude the contents of “AssetsDependenciesbin”.The reason I didn’t excluded dependencies all together is because I can add other folders and DLL references here that I don’t want to build (like… the normal way). This gives me the flexibility of building the projects I want to control and still be able to just reference other pre-built DLLs!

Summary

In three easy steps, you should be able to use Unity, Visual Studio, and multiple projects in one solution in a what-feels-like-normal way. Because there’s still some dynamic stuff going on with Unity updating your main project, you might find the odd time you need to build twice to fix up compilation problems. I’ve seen this happen maybe once or twice so far, but otherwise it feels like normal. It’s also  important to note that you can’t escape the Unity project updating… don’t add references to your main project manually. That’s what that “AssetsDependencies” folder is for that we made.

Here are a few shots of what my setup looks like (proof that it works):

Solution Explorer

Unity Dependencies

And of course… it’s not the perfect solution. There’s still these things:

  • Unity gets mad at you for using junctions within your project. It actually tells you not to do this because you can mess things up. It’s working awesome for me right now though… So I’m going to just ignore this warning.
  • Remember step 3 where we ignored the AssetsDependenciesbin location in git? This actually ignored your junction points you created too. As a result, anyone else who clones your code will need to create junctions too. I’m working solo, so I’m not too worried about this step… But it’s definitely something that should be fixed up (again, I’m sure it’s doable, but I’m in no rush).

Hope that helps you feel more at home in Unity and Visual Studio! It certainly made it nicer for me.

 


First C# Dev Connect is Coming Up

C# Dev Connect

 

C# Dev Connect Meetup!

About a year ago I had thrown around the idea of creating a C#-specific group that would meet at a regular interval with some of my colleagues. I saw that there was interest, but between all of the things we had going on in our personal lives and work lives, we just hadn’t been able to co-ordinate something. I’m excited to announce that with some more solid planning over the last couple of months, C# Dev Connect will be able to host their first meetup! The company I work for, Magnet Forensics, has graciously offered our new office to host the event which will help tremendously. We’ll have a group of people from Magnet Forensics their to help out, but the only thing “Magnet” about the event is really just that it’s hosted at the office.

What’s on the Dev Connect Agenda?

This upcoming Tuesday (Tuesday January 20th, 2015) C# Dev Connect will be hosting their first monthly meetup on the topic of Threading in C#. Directly from the event’s Meetup page:

Overview of the the basics of threading in C# language. Threading is a very complex idea with many different ways of handling the same problem, however, you have to learn to crawl before you can walk. We’ll be discussing the basics of threads in .NET 2.0 and .NET 4.0. In .NET 2.0 we’ll be discussing the Thread object, various ways to start/stop threads, and potential stumbling blocks when it comes to threading in C#. In .NET 4.0 we’ll be talking about the async and await operators and how to use them.

A colleague of mine, Chris Sippel, will be giving the talk. People are encouraged to bring their laptops so they can try out some C# exercises related to the discussion. This initial talk may be more geared at an introductory-level, but our goal is to be able to cover topics for all levels of knowledge in C# (From never used it before, to expert level). We’ll even provide some food! All you have to do is show up and be ready to learn some C#, or share your C# knowledge.

If you’re looking for our venue, we had this little map put together:

C# Dev Connect Venue Map

Go into the back of 156 Columbia Street West in Waterloo (at the corner of Phillip and Columbia). If you’re familiar with the area, this used to be called RIM/Blackberry 5.

 

More Dev Connect Info

Here are a few additional links to get you to more C# Dev Connect information online:

We’re excited for you to join us!


MyoSharp – Update On The Horizon

MyoSharp

If you haven’t checked it out already, my friend Tayfun and I created an open source C# wrapper for Thalmic’s Myo. It’s hosted on GitHub over here, so you can browse and pull down code whenever you want. We’ve had some great feedback from users of our API, so we continue to welcome it (both positive and negative!) in order to improve the usability.

Thalmic has plans to release a firmware update to allow more data to be accessible through their API. Right now, MyoSharp is a bit out of date, but once this big firmware update lands we’ll take some more time to get it up to date again. Remember, it’s open source so you can feel free to contribute!

Troubleshooting

The most common question I receive is “I keep getting an exception about not being able to connect when I run the sample code”. I’ve tried to help a few people through this so I just figured I’d mention it right here for clarity: It’s more than likely that your MyoConnect version and the version we packaged with MyoSharp have become out of date. You probably keep your Myo SDK more up to date than MyoSharp is.

Don’t worry! So far we’ve had reasonably good luck just replacing the Myo DLLs in the x86 and x64 folder of the solution. Provided Thalmic didn’t break any API compatibility, things should actually just work out of the box. If they *DID* break backwards compatibility, it’s likely not that big of a deal either. You can update the PInvokes used to match the signatures they expect, and again, you should be up and running pretty quickly.

With that said, hold tight! We’ll get something updated soon. If you can’t wait, then that’s my suggestion for how to get up and running. Please don’t hesitate to contact Tayfun or myself for troubleshooting. Just post in the comments here and we can try to help out!


ProjectXyz: Enforcing Interfaces (Part 2)

Enforcing Interfaces

This is my second installment of the series related to my small side project that I started. I mentioned in the first post that one of the things I wanted to try out with this project is coding by interfaces. There’s an article over at CodeProject that I once read (I’m struggling to dig it up now, arrrrrghh) that really gave me a different perspective about using interfaces when I program. Ever since then I’ve been a changed man. Seriously.

The main message behind the article was along the lines of: Have your classes implement your interface, and to be certain nobody is going to come by and muck around with your class’s API, make sure they can’t knowingly make an instance of the class. One of the easiest ways to do this (and bear with me here, I’m not claiming this is right or wrong) is to have a hidden (private or protected) constructor on your class and static methods that let you create new instances of your class. However, the trick here is your static method will return the interface your class implements.

An example of this might look like the following:


public interface IMyInterface
{
    void Xyz();
}

public sealed class MyImplementation : IMyInterface
{
    // we hid the constructor from the outside!
    private MyImplementation()
    {
    }

    public static IMyInterface Create()
    {
        return new MyImplementation();
    }

    public void Xyz()
    {
        // do some awesome things here
    }
}

Interesting Benefits

I was pretty intrigued by this article on enforcing interfaces for a few reasons and if you can stick around long enough to read this whole post, I’ll hit the cons/considerations I’ve encountered from actually implementing things this way. These are obviously my opinion, and you can feel free to agree or disagree with me as much as you like.

  • (In theory) it keeps people from coming along and tacking on random methods to my classes. If I have an object hierarchy that I’m creating, having different child classes magically have random public APIs changing independently seems kind of scary. People have a harder time finding ways to abuse this because they aren’t concerned with the concrete implementation, just the interface.
  • Along with the first point, enforcing interfaces makes people think about what they’re doing when they need to change the public API. Now you need to go change the interface. Now you might be affecting X number of implementations. Are you sure?
  • Sets people up nicely to play with IoC and dependency injection. You’re already always working with interfaces because of this, now rolling out something like Moq or Autofac should be easier for you.
  • Methods can be leveraged to do parameter checks BEFORE entering a constructor. Creating IDisposable implementations can be fun when your constructor fails but and your disposable clean up code was expecting things to be initialized (not a terribly strong argument, but I’ve had cases where this makes life easier for me when working with streams).

Enforcing Interfaces in ProjectXyz

I’ve only implemented a small portion of the back-end of ProjectXyz (from what I imagine the scope to be) but it’s enough where I have a couple of layers, some different class/interface hierarchies that interact with each other, and some tests to exercise the API. The following should help explain the current major hierarchies a bit better:

  • Stats are simple structures representing an ID and a value
  • Enchantments are simple structures representing some information about modifying particular stats (slightly more complex than stats)
  • Items are more complex structures that can contain enchantments
  •  Actors are complex structures that:
    • Have collections of stats
    • Have collections of enchantments
    • Have collections of items

Okay, so that’s the high level. There’s obviously a bit more going on with the multi-layered architecture I’m trying out here too (since the hierarchies are repeated in a similar fashion in both layers). However, this is a small but reasonable amount of code to be trying this pattern on.

I have a good handful of classes and associated interfaces that back them. I’ve designed my classes to take in references to interfaces (which, are of course backed by my other classes) and my classes are largely decoupled from implementations of other classes.

Now that I’ve had some time to play with this pattern, what are my initial thoughts? Well, it’s not pure sunshine and rainbows (which I expected) but there are definitely some cool pros I hadn’t considered and definitely some negative side effects that I hadn’t considered either. Stay tuned

(The previous post in this series is here).


ProjectXyz: Why I Started a Side Project (Part 1)

ProjectXyz

Alright, I’ll admit it… Even for a placeholder name on a side project it’s pretty terrible, right? Well, my apologies. So, if you made it to this post you might be wondering what ProjectXyz is and why I started it up. From a high level, I started working on ProjectXyz so that I could have a hobby programming project to tinker with and I figured I’d blog about my adventures in bringing it all together. I plan on making this a mini-series documenting some of the things I’m learning or experimenting with, so this will serve as the intro to the series.

Before we get too far, here’s the link to the GitHub site: https://github.com/ncosentino/ProjectXyz

Why Have a Side Project?

Here’s the main thing I want to talk about in part 1 of this series: Why should you have a side project?

From my experiences in high school and university, I found that having a side project that I could code in was probably the best way that I could continue to learn. It’s a low stress activity that encourages you to be highly creative. You can involve as many other people as you want, or work on it completely solo so that you can minimize external stress and maximize your own creativity. It’s your project, so you have the freedom to do what you want.

I leveraged various small side projects to learn things like how sockets work or how I’d try and structure a multi-tier application. I was able to work on refactoring large amounts of code and learn how to use source control to my advantage. Was there a design pattern I wanted to learn about implementing? Great! Then I could try and find a way to incorporate it into my projects. The goal was always about trying to implement new things and not about cutting corners to try and deliver something to an end user.

Once I started work full-time, I gave up on my programming side projects. I started up this blog which has been fun and I try to take on as much work for my career as I can because I actually enjoy my job… But I stopped coding my own hobby projects. I’ve found that I’m missing out on two major things as a result of that:

  • The ability to experiment with patterns, technologies, and frameworks
  • The ability to get really creative and try out completely new things

Work has been a great opportunity to learn, but it’s learning out of necessity. Myself or my team will hit blocks and we have to work together to try and overcome them. It doesn’t give me the opportunity to go completely into left field to try something new out. Having a side project gives me a bit of freedom to try and learn all sorts of really neat things.

So… Why ProjectXyz?

Okay, well, if you mean why the name… Then I don’t have a great answer. I wanted to start coding but I didn’t want to waste time thinking about a name. I’ll think of something better later, I promise.

Otherwise, you might be wondering why I decided to build ProjectXyz to be what it is (or, what it will be). ProjectXyz is the back end (i.e. not the pretty graphical part) for a role playing game, and I’ve played around with this kind of thing before. I like playing games like this, and I’ve had a lot of fun trying to create a game like this in the past. As a result, I can really focus on what I’m building and not trying to figure out what to build. I’m not pouring energy into wondering “how do I solve this great big popular problem with this piece of software?”, but instead I can just get as creative as I’d like. It’s not about “What does the customer want?”, but instead, I can ask “What do I want to make?”.

The things I’m looking to try out with ProjectXyz (to start with, at least) are:

  • More LINQ usage
  • Coding by interfaces
  • API design
  • Dependency injection and IoC
  • TDD and coded test designs
  • Moq for mocking my classes
  • … GitHub! To make some publicly visible code.

As I work through ProjectXyz, I’ll write more posts on the various things I’m learning as I go! Check out the GitHub page and drop some comments!

https://github.com/ncosentino/ProjectXyz
(The second post in this series is here)


Controlling a Myo Armband with C#

Controlling a Myo Armband with C#

Background

Thalmic Labs has started shipping their Myo armband that allows the wearer’s arm movements and gestures to control different pieces of integrated technology. How cool is that? My friend and I decided we wanted to give one a whirl and see what we could come up with. We’re both C# advocates, so we were a bit taken back when we saw the only C# support in the SDK was made for Unity. We decided to take things into our own hands and open source a Myo C# library. We’re excited to introduce the first version of MyoSharp!

The underlying Myo components are written in C++, and there’s only several functions that are exposed from the library that we can access. In order to do this, we need to leverage platform invocation (PInvokes) from C# to tap into this functionality. Once you have the PInvokes set up you can begin to play around!

The Workflow

Getting setup with the Myo is pretty straightforward, but it wasn’t obvious to us right away. We didn’t have anyone to walk us through how the different components were supposed to work together (just some good ol’ fashioned code) so we had to tinker around. Once we had everything mapped out, it was quite simple though.

  1. The first step is opening a communication channel with the Bluetooth module. You don’t need to worry about the implementation here since it’s all done in C++ by the Thalmic devs. Calling the correct methods using PInvokes from C# allows us to tap into a stream of “events” that come through the Bluetooth module.
  2. Now that we can intercept events, we need to be able to identify a Myo. After all, working with Myos is our main goal here! There’s a “pair” event that we can listen to from the Bluetooth module that notifies us of when a Myo has paired and provides us a handle to the device. This handle gets used for identifying events for a particular Myo or sending a particular Myo messages.
  3. There’s a connect event that will fire when a Myo connects after it’s been paired with the Bluetooth module. A Myo can be paired but disconnected.
  4. Now that we can uniquely identify a Myo, the only things we need to do are intercept events for a particular Myo and make sense of the data coming from the devices! Orientation change? Acceleration change? There’s a host of information that the device sends back, so we need to interpret it.
  5. When a Myo disconnects, there’s an event that’s sent back for that as well.

Getting Started with MyoSharp

I’m going to start this off with some simple code that should illustrate just how easy it is to get started with MyoSharp. I’ll describe what’s going on in the code immediately after.


using System;

using MyoSharp.Device;
using MyoSharp.ConsoleSample.Internal;

namespace MyoSharp.ConsoleSample
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This example will show you the basics for setting up and working with
    /// a Myo using MyoSharp. Primary communication with the device happens
    /// over Bluetooth, but this C# wrapper hooks into the unmanaged Myo SDK to
    /// listen on their "hub". The unmanaged hub feeds us information about
    /// events, so a channel within MyoSharp is responsible for publishing
    /// these events for other C# code to consume. A device listener uses a
    /// channel to listen for pairing events. When a Myo pairs up, a device
    /// listener publishes events for others to listen to. Once we have access
    /// to a channel and a Myo handle (from something like a Pair event), we
    /// can create our own Myo object. With a Myo object, we can do things like
    /// cause it to vibrate or monitor for poses changes.
    /// </summary>
    internal class BasicSetupExample
    {
        #region Methods
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // create a hub that will manage Myo devices for us
            using (var hub = Hub.Create())
            {
                // listen for when the Myo connects
                hub.MyoConnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Myo {0} has connected!", e.Myo.Handle);
                    e.Myo.Vibrate(VibrationType.Short);
                    e.Myo.PoseChanged += Myo_PoseChanged;
                };

                // listen for when the Myo disconnects
                hub.MyoDisconnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Oh no! It looks like {0} arm Myo has disconnected!", e.Myo.Arm);
                    e.Myo.PoseChanged -= Myo_PoseChanged;
                };

                // wait on user input
                ConsoleHelper.UserInputLoop(hub);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Event Handlers
        private static void Myo_PoseChanged(object sender, PoseEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} arm Myo detected {1} pose!", e.Myo.Arm, e.Myo.Pose);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

In this example, we create a hub instance. A hub will manage a collection of Myos that come online and go offline and notify listeners that are interested. Behind the scenes, the hub creates a channel instance and passes this into a device listener instance. The channel and device listener combination allows for being notified when devices come online and is the core of the hub implementation. You can manage Myos on your own by completely bypassing the Hub class and creating your own channel and device listener if you’d like. It’s totally up to you.

In the code above, we’ve hooked up several event handlers. There’s an event handler to listen for when Myo devices connect, and a similar one for when the devices disconnect. We’ve also hooked up to an instance of a Myo device for when it changes poses. This will simply give us a console message every time the hardware determines that the user is making a different pose.

When devices go offline, the hub actually keeps the instance of the Myo object around. This means that if you have device A and you hook up to it’s PoseChanged event, if it goes offline and comes back online several times, your event will still be hooked up to the object that represents device A. This makes managing Myos much easier compared to trying to re-hook event handlers every time a device goes on and offline. Of course, you’re free to make your own implementation using our building blocks, so there’s no reason to feel forced into this paradigm.

It’s worth mentioning that the UserInputLoop() method is only used to keep the program alive. The sample code on GitHub actually lets you use some debug commands to read some Myo statuses if you’re interested. Otherwise, you could just imagine this line is replaced by Console.ReadLine() to block waiting for the user to press enter.

Pose Sequences

Without even diving into the accelerometer, orientation, and gyroscope readings, we were looking for some quick wins to building up on the basic API that we created. One little improvement we wanted to make was the concept of pose sequences. The Myo will send events when a pose changes, but if you were interested in grouping some of these together there’s no way to do this out of the box. With a pose sequence, you can declare a series of poses and get an event triggered when the user has finished the sequence.

Here’s an example:


using System;

using MyoSharp.Device;
using MyoSharp.ConsoleSample.Internal;
using MyoSharp.Poses;

namespace MyoSharp.ConsoleSample
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Myo devices can notify you every time the device detects that the user 
    /// is performing a different pose. However, sometimes it's useful to know
    /// when a user has performed a series of poses. A 
    /// <see cref="PoseSequence"/> can monitor a Myo for a series of poses and
    /// notify you when that sequence has completed.
    /// </summary>
    internal class PoseSequenceExample
    {
        #region Methods
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // create a hub to manage Myos
            using (var hub = Hub.Create())
            {
                // listen for when a Myo connects
                hub.MyoConnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Myo {0} has connected!", e.Myo.Handle);

                    // for every Myo that connects, listen for special sequences
                    var sequence = PoseSequence.Create(
                        e.Myo, 
                        Pose.WaveOut, 
                        Pose.WaveIn);
                    sequence.PoseSequenceCompleted += Sequence_PoseSequenceCompleted;
                };

                ConsoleHelper.UserInputLoop(hub);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Event Handlers
        private static void Sequence_PoseSequenceCompleted(object sender, PoseSequenceEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} arm Myo has performed a pose sequence!", e.Myo.Arm);
            e.Myo.Vibrate(VibrationType.Medium);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

The same basic setup occurs as the first example. We create a hub that listens for Myos, and when one connects, we hook a new PoseSequence instance to it. If you recall how the hub class works from the first example, this will hook up a new pose sequence each time the Myo connects (which, in this case, isn’t actually ideal). Just for demonstration purposes, we were opting for this shortcut though.

When creating a pose sequence, we only need to provide the Myo and the poses that create the sequence. In this example, a user will need to wave their hand out and then back in for the pose sequence to complete. There’s an event provided that will fire when the sequence has completed. If the user waves out and in several times, the event will fire for each time the sequence is completed. You’ll also notice in our event handler we actually send a vibrate command to the Myo! Most of the Myo interactions are reading values from Myo events, but in this case this is one of the commands we can actually send to it.

Held Poses

The event stream from the Myo device only sends events for poses when the device detects a change. When we were trying to make a test application with our initial API, we were getting frustrated with the fact that there was no way to trigger some action as long as a pose was being held. Some actions like zooming, panning, or adjusting levels for something are best suited to be linked to a pose being held by the user. Otherwise, if you wanted to make an application that would zoom in when the user makes a fist, the user would have to make a fist, relax, make a fist, relax, etc… until they zoomed in or out far enough. This obviously makes for poor usability, so we set out to make this an easy part of our API.

The code below has a similar setup to the previous examples, but introduces the HeldPose class:


using System;

using MyoSharp.Device;
using MyoSharp.ConsoleSample.Internal;
using MyoSharp.Poses;

namespace MyoSharp.ConsoleSample
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Myo devices can notify you every time the device detects that the user 
    /// is performing a different pose. However, sometimes it's useful to know
    /// when a user is still holding a pose and not just that they've 
    /// transitioned from one pose to another. The <see cref="HeldPose"/> class
    /// monitors a Myo and notifies you as long as a particular pose is held.
    /// </summary>
    internal class HeldPoseExample
    {
        #region Methods
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // create a hub to manage Myos
            using (var hub = Hub.Create())
            {
                // listen for when a Myo connects
                hub.MyoConnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Myo {0} has connected!", e.Myo.Handle);

                    // setup for the pose we want to watch for
                    var pose = HeldPose.Create(e.Myo, Pose.Fist, Pose.FingersSpread);

                    // set the interval for the event to be fired as long as 
                    // the pose is held by the user
                    pose.Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.5);

                    pose.Start();
                    pose.Triggered += Pose_Triggered;
                };

                ConsoleHelper.UserInputLoop(hub);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Event Handlers
        private static void Pose_Triggered(object sender, PoseEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} arm Myo is holding pose {1}!", e.Myo.Arm, e.Pose);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

When we create a HeldPose instance, we can pass in one or more poses that we want to monitor for being held. In the above example, we’re watching for when the user makes a fist or when they have their fingers spread. We can hook up to the Triggered event on the held pose instance, and the event arguments that we get in our event handler will tell us which pose the event is actually being triggered for.

If you take my zoom example that I started describing earlier, we could have a single event handler responsible for both zooming in and zooming out based on a pose being held. If we picked two poses, say fist and fingers spread, to mean zoom in and zoom out respectively, then we could check the pose on the event arguments in the event handler and adjust the zoom accordingly. Of course, you could always make two HeldPose instances (one for each pose) and hook up to the events separately if you’d like. This would end up creating two timer threads behind the scenes–one for each HeldPose instance.

The HeldPose class also has an interval setting. This allows the programmer to adjust the frequency that they want the Triggered event to fire, provided that a pose is being held by the user. For example, if the interval is set to be two seconds, as long as the pose is being held the Triggered event will fire every two seconds.

Roll, Pitch, and Yaw

The data that comes off the Myo can become overwhelming unless you’re well versed in vector math and trigonometry. Something that we’d like to build up and improve upon is the usability of data that comes off the Myo. We don’t want each programmer to have to write similar code to get the values from the Myo into a usable form for their application. Instead, if we can build that into MyoSharp, then everyone will benefit.

Roll, pitch, and yaw are values that we decided to bake into the API directly. So… what exactly are these things? Here’s a diagram to help illustrate:

Roll, Pitch, and Yaw - MyoSharp

Roll, pitch, and yaw describe rotation around one of three axes in 3D space.

The following code example shows hooking up to an event handler to get the roll, pitch, and yaw data:


using System;

using MyoSharp.Device;
using MyoSharp.ConsoleSample.Internal;

namespace MyoSharp.ConsoleSample
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This example will show you how to hook onto the orientation events on
    /// the Myo and pull roll, pitch and yaw values from it.
    /// </summary>
    internal class OrientationExample
    {
        #region Methods
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // create a hub that will manage Myo devices for us
            using (var hub = Hub.Create())
            {
                // listen for when the Myo connects
                hub.MyoConnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Myo {0} has connected!", e.Myo.Handle);
                    e.Myo.OrientationDataAcquired += Myo_OrientationDataAcquired;
                };

                // listen for when the Myo disconnects
                hub.MyoDisconnected += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Oh no! It looks like {0} arm Myo has disconnected!", e.Myo.Arm);
                    e.Myo.OrientationDataAcquired -= Myo_OrientationDataAcquired;
                };

                // wait on user input
                ConsoleHelper.UserInputLoop(hub);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Event Handlers
        private static void Myo_OrientationDataAcquired(object sender, OrientationDataEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.Clear();
            Console.WriteLine(@"Roll: {0}", e.Roll);
            Console.WriteLine(@"Pitch: {0}", e.Pitch);
            Console.WriteLine(@"Yaw: {0}", e.Yaw);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Of course, if we know of more common use cases that people will be using the orientation data for, then we’d love to bake this kind of stuff right into MyoSharp to make it easier for everyone.

Closing Comments

That’s just a quick look at how you can leverage MyoSharp to make your own C# application to work with a Myo! As I said, MyoSharp is open source so we’d love to see contributions or ideas for suggestions. We’re aiming to provide as much base functionality as we can into our framework but designing it in a way that developers can extend upon each of the individual building blocks.


Refactoring For Interfaces: An Adventure From The Trenches

puzzle

Refactoring: Some Background

If you’re a seasoned programmer you know all about refactoring. If you’re relatively new to programming, you probably have heard of refactoring but don’t have that much experience actually doing it. After all, it’s easier to just rewrite things from scratch instead of trying to make a huge design change part way through, right? In any mature software project, it’s often the case where you’ll get to a point where your code base in its current state cannot properly sustain large changes going forward. It’s not really anyone’s fault–it’s totally natural. It’s impossible to plan absolutely everything that comes up, so it’s probable that at some point at least part of your software project will face refactoring.

In my real life example, I was tasked with refactoring a software project that has a single owner. I’m close with the owner and they’re a very technical person, but they’re also not a programmer. Because I’m not physically near the owner (and I have a full-time job, among other things I’m doing) it’s often difficult to debug any problems that come up. The owner can’t simply open an editor and get down to the code to fix things up.

So there was an obvious solution which I avoided in the first place… Unit tests. Duh. I need unit tests. So that’s an easy solution right? I’ll bust out my favourite testing framework (I’m a fan of xUnit) and start getting some solid code coverage. Well… in an ideal world, like every programming article is ever written, this would have been the case. But that wasn’t the case. My software project does a lot of direct HTTP/FTP requests and interacts with particular hardware on the machine. How awesome is writing a unit test that contacts an HTTP server? Not very awesome.

What was I to do? I need to be able to write unit tests so that I can validate my software before putting it in my customer’s hands, but I can’t test it with unit tests because I don’t have the hardware!

Refactoring for Interfaces

Okay, so the first step in my master plan is to refactor for interfaces. What do I mean by that? Well, I have a lot of code that will call out and make HTTP requests and it has a specific dependency on System.Net.WebRequest. The same thing holds true for my FTP requests I want to make. Because I have that dependency within my classes, it means I have no choice but to call out to the network and go do these things.

I could design it a different way though. What if I abstracted the web requests away so that I didn’t actually have to call that class directly? What if I could have a reference to some instance that met some API that would just do that stuff for me? I mean, my class knows all about it’s on particular job, but it truthfully doesn’t know the first thing about calling out to the Internet to go post some HTTP requests. This means if someone else is responsible for providing me with a mechanism for giving me the ability to post HTTP requests, this other entity could also fool me and not actually send out HTTP requests at all! That sounds like exactly what my test framework would want to do.

My first step was to look at the properties and methods I was using on the WebRequest class. What was shared between the HTTP and FTP requests that I was creating? The few things I had to consider were:

  • Some sort of Send() method to actually send the request
  • A URI to identify where the request is being sent
  • A timeout property

I then created an interface for a web request that had these properties/methods accessible and created some wrapper classes that implemented this interface but encapsulated the functionality of the underlying web requests. The next step was creating a class and interface for a “factory” that could create these requests. This is because my code that needs to make HTTP/FTP requests only knows it needs to make those requests–It doesn’t have any knowledge on how to actually create one.

With my interfaces for my requests and my factory that creates them, I was able to move onto the next step.

Create Mocks for the Interfaces

Now that I had my classes leveraging interfaces instead of concrete classes internally, I could mock the inner-workings of my classes. This would provide two major benefits:

  • I could create tests that wouldn’t have to actually go out to the Internet/network.
  • I could create instrumented mocks that would let me test whether certain web requests were being made.

I started off my writing up some unit tests. I tried to get as much code coverage as I could by doing simple tests (i.e. create an object, check default values, call a method and check a result, etc…). Once I had exhausted a lot of the simple stuff, I targeted the other areas that I wasn’t hitting. I mean, how was my coded test supposed to test my method that does an HTTP request and an FTP of a file under the hood? Mocks.

So this is where you probably draw the line between your integration tests or unit tests and get all pedantic about it. But I don’t care how you want to separate it: I need coded tests that cover a section of my class so that I can ensure it behaves as I expect. But if I’m mocking my dependencies, how do I know my class is actually doing what I expect?

Instrument your mocks! This was totally cool for me to play around with for the first time. I had to create dummy FTP/HTTP requests that met the interface my class under test expected. Pretty easy. But I could actually assert what requests my class under test was actually trying to send out! This meant that if my method was supposed to try and hit a certain URL, I could assert that easily by instrumenting my mocked instance to check just that. Was it supposed to FTP a certain set of bytes? No problem. Use my mocked instance to assert those bytes are actually the ones my class under test is trying to send.

Wrap Up

This was just a general post, and I didn’t put up any code to go along with it. Sorry. I really just wanted to cover my experience with refactoring, interfaces, mocking, and code coverage because it was a great learning for me.

To recap on what I said in this post:

  • Identify the parts you want to mock. These are the things your class or method probably isn’t responsible for creating directly. Going out to the network? Accessing the disk? Accessing the environment your test is running under? Creating complex concrete classes because they hook into some other system for you? Great candidates for this.
  • Create interfaces by looking at the API you’re accessing. You know what classes you want to mock, so look how you’re using the API. If you need to access a few properties and methods, then make that part of your interface. If you see commonality between a few similar things, you might be able to create a single interface to handle all of the scenarios.
  • Inject factories that can create instances for you. These factories know how to create the concrete classes that meet your interfaces. In a real situation, they can create the classes you expect. In a test environment, they can create your mocks.
  • Write coded tests with your mocks! The last part is the most fun. You can finally inject some mocked classes into your classes/methods under test and then instrument them to ensure your code under test is accessing them in the way you expect. Run some code coverage tools after to prove you’re doing a good job.

I hope my experiences down this path are able to help you out!


IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

Background

A few months ago I wrote up an article on using PyTools, Visual Studio, and Python all together. I received some much appreciated positive feedback for it, but really for me it was about exploring. I had dabbled with Python a few years back and hadn’t really touched it much since. I spend the bulk of my programming time in Visual Studio, so it was a great opportunity to try and bridge that gap.

I had an individual contact me via the Dev Leader Facebook group that had come across my original article. However, he wanted a little bit more out of it. Since I had my initial exploring out of the way, I figured it was probably worth trying to come up with a semi-useful example. I could get two birds with one stone here–Help out at least one person, and get another blog post written up!

The request was really around taking the output from a Python script and being able to display it in a WinForm application. I took it one step further and created an application that either lets you choose a Python script from your file system or let you type in a basic script directly on the form. There isn’t any fancy editor tools on the form, but someone could easily take this application and extend it into a little Python editor if they wanted to.

Leveraging IronPython

In my original PyTools article, I mention how to get IronPython installed into your Visual Studio project. In Visual Studio 2012 (and likely a very similar approach for other versions of Visual Studio), the following steps should get you setup with IronPython in your project:

  • Open an existing project or start a new one.
  • Make sure your project is set to be at least .NET 4.0
    • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Properties”
    • Switch to the “Application” tab.
    • Under “Target framework”, select  “.NET Framework 4.0”.
  • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Manage NuGet Packages…”.
  • In the “Search Online” text field on the top right, search for “IronPython”.
  • Select “IronPython” from within the search results and press the “Install” button.
  • Follow the instructions, and you should be good to go!

Now that we have IronPython in a project, we’ll need to actually look at some code that gets us up and running with executing Python code from within C#. If you followed my original post, you’ll know that it’s pretty simple:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("your python code here");

And there you have it. If it seems easy, that’s because it is. But what about the part about getting the output from Python? What if I wanted to print something to the console in Python and see what it spits out? After all, that’s the goal I was setting out to accomplish with this article. If you try the following code, you’ll notice you see a whole lot of nothing:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("print('I wish I could see this in the console...')");

What gives? How are we supposed to see the output from IronPython? Well, it all has to do with setting the output Stream of the IronPython engine. It has a nice little method for letting you specify what stream to output to:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(yourStreamInstanceHere);

In this example, I wanted to output the stream directly into my own TextBox. To accomplish this, I wrote up my own little stream wrapper that takes in a TextBox and appends the stream contents directly to the Text property of the TextBox. Here’s what my stream implementation looks like:


private class ScriptOutputStream : Stream
{
  #region Fields
  private readonly TextBox _control;
  #endregion

  #region Constructors
  public ScriptOutputStream(TextBox control)
  {
    _control = control;
  }
  #endregion

  #region Properties
  public override bool CanRead
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanSeek
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanWrite
  {
    get { return true; }
  }

  public override long Length
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }

  public override long Position
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    set { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }
  #endregion

  #region Exposed Members
  public override void Flush()
  {
  }

  public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void SetLength(long value)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    _control.Text += Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(buffer, offset, count);
  }
  #endregion
}

Now while this isn’t pretty, it serves one purpose: Use the stream API to allow binary data to be appended to a TextBox. The magic is happening inside of the Write() method where I take the binary data that IronPython will be providing to us, convert it to a string via code page 1252 encoding, and then append that directly to the control’s Text property. In order to use this, we just need to set it up on our IronPython engine:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(new ScriptOutputStream(txtYourTextBoxInstance), Encoding.GetEncoding(1252));

Now, any time you output to the console in IronPython you’ll get your console output directly in your TextBox! The ScriptOutputStream implementation and calling SetOutput() are really the key points in getting output from IronPython.

The Application at a Glance

I wanted to take this example a little bit further than the initial request. I didn’t just want to show that I could take the IronPython output and put it in a form control, I wanted to demonstrate being able to pick the Python code to run too!

Firstly, you’re able to browse for Python scripts using the default radio button. Just type in the path to your script or use the browse button:

IronPython - Run script from file

Enter a path or browse for your script. Press “Run Script” to see the output of your script in the bottom TextBox.

Next, press “Run Script”, and you’re off! This simply uses a StreamReader to get the contents of the file and then once in the contents are stored in a string, they are passed into the IronPython engine’s Execute() method. As you might have guessed, my “helloworld.py” script just contains a single line that prints out “Hello, World!”. Nothing too fancy in there!

Let’s try running a script that we type into the input TextBox instead. There’s some basic error handling so if your script doesn’t execute, I’ll print out the exception and the stack trace to go along with it. In this case, I tried executing a Python script that was just “asd”. Clearly, this is invalid and shouldn’t run:

python_error_asd

Python interpreted the input we provided but, as expected, could not find a definition for “asd”.

That should be along the lines of what we expected–The script isn’t valid, and IronPython tells us why. What other errors can we see? Well, the IronPython engine will also let you know if you have bad syntax:

python_error_bad_syntax

Python interpreted the script, but found a syntax error in our silly input.

Finally, if we want to see some working Python we can do some console printing. Let’s try a little HelloWorld-esque script:

python_pass_hello_world

Python interpreted our simple Hello World script.

Summary

This sample was pretty short but that just demonstrates how easy it is! Passing in a script from C# into the IronPython is straight forward, but getting the output from IronPython is a bit trickier. If you’re not familiar with the different parts of the IronPython engine, it can be difficult to find the things you need to get this working. With a simple custom stream implementation we’re able to get the output from IronPython easily. All we had to do was create our own stream implementation and pass it into the SetOutput() method that’s available via the IronPython engine class. Now we can easily hook the output of our Python scripts!

As always, all of the source for you to try this out is available online:

Some next steps might include:

  • Creating your own Python IDE. Figure out some nice text-editing features and you can run Python scripts right from your application.
  • Creating a test script dashboard. Do you write test scripts for other applications in Python? Why not have a dashboard that can report on the results of these scripts?
  • Add in some game scripting! Sure, you could have done this with IronPython alone, but maybe now you can skip the WinForms part of this and just make your own stream wrapper for getting script output. Cook up some simple scripts in a scripting engine and voila! You can easily pass information into Python and get the results back out.

Let me know in the comments if you come up with some other cool ideas for how you can leverage this!


Article Dump #24 – Weekly Article Dump

Article Dump #24 - Dev Leader (Image by http://www.sxc.hu)

Article Dump #24

Welcome to the 24th issue of my (nearly) weekly article dumps. I don’t have a theme or an update this week, so it’s kept pretty short. I hope you find the following articles interesting though! Leave me a comment if you have any opinions on these

Articles

  • The 7 Values That Drive IDEO: In this article, the CEO of IDEO Tim Brown talks about the various values that his organization embraces to have a creative culture. Some of the ideas in the slides seem really high level or like generic fluff, but try thinking about what they would mean in your organization. It’s one thing to glance at IDEO’s list and say “Yeah, yeah… That’s nice…” but when you actually think about how that fits in with your organization, you might actually realize you don’t embody those values. Do you learn from failure? Does your organization promote an ask for forgiveness not permission approach? Would this make sense in your organization? Just some food for thought, but I thought a lot of these values were interesting to think about and how embracing them might change the organization I work in.
  • The 15 Most Annoying Coworkers of All Time: Ilya Pozin put together a pretty funny article on different types of coworkers you’ll encounter in your career. I got worried that I might be #13 on the list… The office comedian who isn’t actually funny. Apparently this post got a lot of flack in the comments on LinkedIn. I guess people were expecting a really serious article on how to deal with these different types of problems in the workplace. I didn’t really have expectations when I read it, aside from not wanting to find myself on the list. Maybe the main take away point here is… don’t annoy your colleagues!
  • Companies Frustrate Innovative Employees: Gijs van Wulfen takes a different perspective on innovation. So many people now are writing about embracing failure (so far as you learn from it). I’m actually a big believer in that approach–take controlled risks and learn from things that don’t go as expected. Gijs’ perspective is a little bit different: forget embracing failure; boost the innovation effectiveness rate! Gijs goes through a workflow for trying to improve innovation at various steps in the process. Pretty interesting!
  • Your Boss is Happier Than You (But Shouldn’t Be): Jeff Haden tells us something we probably all (let’s say in the majority of circumstances) know: your boss is happier than you. Big surprise right? They get to make decisions, have fewer bosses than you, and they make more money. Sounds like a good reason to be happier, no? But if your boss is happier than you, those probably aren’t the exact reasons. Your superiors are likely happier than you because of autonomy. They get a bit more freedom to do accomplish goals in their own way. Jeff has a big list of reasons why your boss is probably happier… and none of them are about money.
  • When is it a Good Idea to write Bad Code?: Rejoice in the first programming article for this week! Tech debt. Ever heard of it? If not, it’s not likely that you’ve never encountered it in your programming career. I’d wager at least one of the last handful of big features you implemented in your code base either had to deal with some tech debt or perhaps even introduced some tech debt. Brad Carleton has put together a big list of different types of tech debt and what they mean in your project. I highly suggest you read it if your a programmer. There’s a lot of things to be aware of with tech debt but it’s important to remember that tech debt isn’t always the worst thing that could happen. Sometimes it’s okay to sacrifice a sub-par design now in order to get some software out the door. Your users might try it out and decide they don’t like the functionality anyway, and you’d end up re-writing it again!
  • “Happiness” vs “Meaningfulness” — The Surprising DifferenceAlex Banayan‘s article discusses the difference between happiness and meaningfulness. It appears as though often happiness and meaningfulness are not necessarily aligned. For example, it might be easy to chase a life of happiness that lacks meaning, or dedicate your life to something meaningful but not be very happy while doing it. The real question is, is it possible to achieve a balance where you’re leading a fulfilling life that keeps you happy? Alex talks briefly about five different categories and how each can sway to something more meaningful or something that provides more happiness. Are you living a happy and fulfilling life? Do you have to balance these five categories carefully?

Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week. Thanks!


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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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