Tag: recognition

Continuous Improvement – One on One Tweaks (Pt. 2)

Continuous Improvement - One on One Tweaks (Pt. 2)

Continuing With Continuous Improvement

I wrote about continuous improvement before and how I’ve been trying to tie that into my leadership role through changes to my one on one process. To recap, at our organization we try to roll continuous improvement into most things that we do. We’re well aware that we’re not going to get things perfect the first time, so as long as we have a process in place to learn, reflect, and adapt, then we can make changes to better our situation. It’s something that’s ongoing and it doesn’t really have an end. So long as your organization is growing and changing over time, or the environment in which your organization is changing over time, having continuous improvement baked into your culture is key to success.

Previously, I mentioned that at Magnet Forensics I hold regular one on ones with my team members. I made a tweak to them that included summarizing notes before holding the one on ones and saw a great improvement. I felt that for now this would be a positive change that I’d like to continue on with. I’ll keep reflecting on whether or not this makes sense over time.

What’s next, then?

Recognition

Recognition is something that I think is fundamental to keeping people engaged, but it looks different for everyone. When I comment on things or share things on social media, I often reflect on how recognition is incredibly important. It’s been a goal of mine to try and do a better job at recognizing my team members for the hard work they’re always putting in.

That was my next hack for continuous improvement. How could I leverage my one on one time to do a better job at recognition? Well, if recognizing my team for things they do is high on my priority list, then it should fall high on the one on one discussion list. The first thing, actually.

So now that I create a summary of topics to go over in our one on ones, I reflect on what my team members say they work on and I toss in other stuff they may not have mentioned. Did they have big accomplishments in our sprint? Did they have things outside of work? Did they have tweaks they suggested for the team to try? Accomplish goals they set for themselves? I try to gather that information and comment on a couple of things at the start of our one on ones now.

I want the team to know that their hard work and their success does not go unnoticed and that they should all keep working to the best of their abilities.

Results?

I’ve only been doing this recently, so I can’t quite say that I’ve noticed big differences. In my opinion, the team has been entering a solid groove over the past few months but it’s hard for me to say whether or not these one on one changes had any impact. I like to think that they did. I’ve heard from several people that they’re really happy with where the team is at.

Has this brought about anything negative? Were there any cons to rolling out this change? I’d say no, not at all. It’s no extra effort for me to reflect on what accomplishments each team member has add. I mean, I’m not writing out lengthy documentation on each accomplishment, but I jot down a couple of points on what I want to call out. I think if anything, that quick exercise has been really positive for myself, if not for the other team member.

So, in the end, I think this small tweak has been a positive change for me in terms of doing a better job of recognizing the team. I also hope that the team has a better understanding that myself and others do see their hard work and efforts.

Keep on it, Team Magnet!


Recognition: One of Team Magnet’s Masterminds

Recognition: One of Team Magnet's Masterminds (Image by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Background

At Magnet Forensics, I lead an awesome team of people with the mission of creating forensics software to help investigators around the world solve crimes. We’re stacked with incredible people–and not only on the team I’m on, but company-wide. We do a great job of recognizing our achievements as an organization and as a team, but also on an individual level. If someone has gone above and beyond, we don’t keep that a secret.

I’ve been trying to make more of a conscious effort to recognize the people I work with, especially in ways that are unique to my own style. I think recognizing people in person is important, but you also need to consider your setting. Sometimes recognition in a public forum isn’t actually appreciated or isn’t nearly as effective as appreciating in a one-on-one setting. I find even for myself that I get uncomfortable when being recognized in a public setting.

With that said, I wanted to recognize an individual I work with without shining too much of a spotlight directly her. Thank you, Christine, for all of your hard work.

Broken Retrospectives

At Magnet, we try to adhere to some agile philosophies.  It lets us pivot pretty quickly to customer needs–which keeps them quite happy–and still lets us deliver rock solid software. We develop in short cycles called “sprints” and at the end of every sprint we have a retrospective to look back at what worked well and what didn’t. That way in the next sprint we can make improvements. Keep the good stuff, drop the broken stuff and try out a thing or two that’s new. This is excellent for continuous improvement unless…

They don’t work.

We would run our retrospectives religiously, but it seemed like nobody really wanted to be there. It was a seemingly forced meeting where I felt a lot of the time I was trying to stir up conversation. By the end of the meeting, just about everyone would have chimed in, but there weren’t a lot of ideas being generated. It was long, boring, and didn’t accomplish any of the goals we wanted it to. Thus, our development cycles stayed basically the same for a while. They worked and they didn’t appear to be broken enough that people wanted to see change.

Things remained the same until I received some input from Christine. When Christine read an article on LinkedIn called I Like, I Wish, I Wonder, she thought it might have some positive carry-over to our development process. If Christine thought that it might spark a change in our retrospectives, that was more change than I was hearing from the team in general (including myself, to be fair). So I decided we’d give it a shot.

Annnd we haven’t looked back since.

I won’t go too in-depth on how I Like, I Wish, I Wonder has rocked our retrospective world because I want to save that for a separate write-up. The point is that it did, and it’s all thanks to Christine for digging it up for us. We’ve started to completely overhaul different aspects of our development process now that retrospectives are effective. I really started to realize just how big of an impact it had when I was explaining some of the development process changes to our CEO. I remember thinking “Wow… If we wouldn’t have switched our retrospective process, we’d be nowhere near as efficient”.

So, thank you for the retrospective idea, Christine. For anyone else looking to flip retrospectives around, try out the I Like, I Wish, I Wonder scheme.

Personalities

I can imagine a lot of people in the development world don’t think too much about personalities. I know I didn’t. Sure, everyone is different. Everyone has their own effective ways of communicating, things they like, things they don’t like, and optimal situations for working. I get it. Now let me go do my work and you go do your work. In an ideal world, you just assume everyone can figure out everyone else that they’re working with, and things will just be fine. Except things are never ideal, and it never hurts to put in a bit more effort to make sure you can get your team up to speed.

So we tried something out. I worked with my HR manager (read: communicated a potential scenario for our development team, let her run free with her awesome creative ideas, and then helped her where she needed it) to roll out a Myers-Briggs personality test for a small sub-team of our development team. If you aren’t familiar with the tests or the concept, check out the link and read up on it! We figured it would be best to try this kind of thing out on a small part of the team to see if they would find value in it, and if so, we’d try the whole team.

After we rolled out the Myers-Briggs results with the small team, the benefits were immediately noticeable. We didn’t even have to leave the room before seeing the benefits. We knew there was some potential here, so we were already excited to try it out with the rest of the team. With everyone being aware of how other individuals may act and react when communicating and working, it makes a big difference in how particular scenarios are approached.

Thank you, Christine, for making differences in personality something to be cognizant of and then supporting our roll-out of Myers-Briggs. For anyone reading this that manages a team or is part of one… Consider the personality types of the people you work with. Maybe you don’t need a formalized Myers-Briggs plan, but it’s worth raising awareness of it.

Thank You, Christine

Christine, you’ve made a lot of great contributions to the team and I’d like to thank you for them. Our development processes have been able to greatly improve thanks to your initial suggestion. I’m sure we would have adapted over time, but your suggested tweaks have certainly acted as a catalyst. Your furthered support with the personality type analysis and subsequent rollout was also greatly appreciated. You were able to participate in our mini-experiment and offered great feedback to turn it into a success for the entire team.

Thank you. I’m looking forward to what this year will bring!


Article Summaries: Weekly Article Dump #17

Article Summaries: Weekly Article Dump #17 (Image from http://www.sxc.hu/)

Articles

  • It’s official: Video games make your brain bigger: I don’t have much time for video games anymore, but this is still totally awesome news. It’s in. It’s official. Video games can actually make you smarter. How great is that? If you’re like me and you find you don’t have much time for games any more, it might be worth picking up a hobby game. It’s a great way to relax provided you don’t get too addicted to it and apparently it can make you smarter. Perfect combo!
  • The myth of the brainstorming session: The best ideas don’t always come from meetings: I thought this article was pretty interesting because we do a lot of brain storming at our office. Sometimes I like to think the sessions go smoothly or that they’re productive. When I contrast them with particular cases that are a bit out of our ordinary approach, it seems like there are certainly some factors that improve the outcome.
    We’ve been dabbling in some personality tests to understand team dynamics a little bit better. To the article’s point, extroverted personalities almost always overrun introverted personalities in a brainstorming meeting from my experience. It’s really unfortunate actually and clearly not really fair if everyone is supposed to be getting their ideas out. In order to get the best results, I think that everyone needs a way to get their thoughts out, and sometimes it’s not doable if you have certain people overrunning others.
    The article also touches on a fear of judgement concept that I think certainly holds true. In a recent brainstorming style meeting, instead of having individuals put on the spot and discuss their opinions, we white boarded them all at once. There was anonymity aside from when the person right beside you writing could peek at what you were putting down. The results were much better than any of our previous meetings of this style. I can’t be entirely sure that the whiteboarding was the reasoning, but it’s definitely something I’d like to try again in the future.
  • Matt Chang – Team Magnet Recognition: This is a post I put out earlier this week. As part of my attempt to recognize the amazing team of people I work with at Magnet Forensics, I decided to write up about our superstar customer/tech support. I know I’d never survive in a tech support role, so I have even more respect for Matt Chang being able to do such a good job. He’s been a great addition to the team, and he makes our troubleshooting of customer issues infinitely easier. Thanks for all your amazing work, Matt.
  • 6 Talent Management Lessons From the Silicon Valley: In this article by John Sullivan, he discusses talent management in the valley. The fundamental idea here is that it’s all driven by innovation. Some key take away points from the article is that innovation is actually a more important goal than productivity and the ability to move fast has a huge affect on this. Additionally, people who innovate want to have an impact. Sharing stories about how previous feats have proven to have a great impact can also be a great driving force.
  • Quality & Agility in Software: Session With Paul Carvalho: This is another article I put out this week about Paul Carvalho who came to speak to our development team. Simply put, the time we had with Paul was packed with information and activities. Every second we spent with him felt like we were absorbing something new and useful. It was far too short. We had lots of great learnings to take away and bring to our own drawing board. We’re excited to be implementing some changes in the upcoming week.
  • Rather than Whine, We Can Learn from the Boring Aspects of a JobMohamed El-Erian reminds us that even the most interesting and glamorous jobs have dull moments. We shouldn’t whine or avoid these situations–they’re vital stepping stones. It’s not realistic to assume you can cut every corner and take every shortcut to get exactly where you want in your career and in life. You have to work hard at what you do and embrace even the small things that can seem boring and monotonous.
  • Fragments: Creating a Tabbed Android User Interface: This is yet another one of my posts that I shared this week. This is my first Android tutorial, and I’m pretty proud of it! It’s very basic, has lots of pictures, and all of the sample code is available to download. I’m confident that anyone interested in picking up Android programming would be able to follow along. Even experienced programmers looking for a way to get a tabbed user interface using fragments in their Android app should find some benefit too! I just found out today that my tutorial made it into the Android Weekly Issue #76, so that was pretty exciting. You can download the app too (it’s pretty basic) to see what the end result will be. Check it out and let me know what you think.

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Matt Chang – Team Magnet Recognition

Matt Chang - Team Magnet Recognition

Matt “Chang-a-rang” Chang

If you saw this post, then the face above is no new face to you. You’re familiar with that beautiful ‘stache already. Okay, so I’m being a little misleading… Matt Chang doesn’t walk around with that glorious caterpillar on his face all year round. We’re working on that though.

You’re likely wondering why I’m putting incredible pictures of Matt Chang on the web and why I’m even writing this. Previously I mentioned that I want to start recognizing the people I work with when I feel that they’re going above and beyond. I did this with Cam Sapp not too long ago, and I plan to keep doing it for all of the great people I work with. There are a million ways to recognize someone, whether it be in team meetings, personally, or by doing what I’m doing right now. I hope he finds it at least mildly embarrassing, and I hope you get to realize just how important Matt Chang is to Team Magnet.

The Origins of The Chang

It must have been just under a year ago now when we were going out to recruit, if my calculations are correct. Based on the density of moustache growth that was on Matt Chang’s face, it must have been pretty late into M/November. We had an instantaneous bonding moment when Chang, my colleague Tayfun, and I stood at our Magnet Forensics booth and introduced ourselves–With our mighty ‘staches. It just goes to show you that we were all on the same page when we made the conscious decision to  leave our nose sweaters on when going to a public event. Needless to say, our conversations with Chang went great, and he was definitely our top candidate for the position based on everything we had heard from him.

In the early days, having Matt on board with us didn’t affect my day-to-day all that much. If there were customer questions/concerns coming in, he wouldn’t necessarily be able to answer them because he was brand new to the product. Completely expected. The only difference in my work was that now I’d periodically chat with a ‘stacheless Chang about potential bugs or customer questions. (I’ll get to the good stuff a bit later, hold your horses).

Aside from work, Matt Chang was a great addition to the Magnet culture. He’s one of our pro-star soccer players, and even the sales and marketing side of the office like him! They’re a tough crowd too, so that really means something. Whether it’s because it’s required by his job or just because he’s an awesome dude, Chang is incredibly approachable and easy to get along with. Simply put, he was a damn steal for us.

Above and Beyond

So now you know a bit about Matt Chang. Pretty sweet guy, right? No doubt. So what’s actually so good about Chang (aside from being able to grow a beauty ‘stache and being a great team player)?

Chang is our front line tech support guy. It’s probably the toughest position we have at Magnet. For anyone that knows me on a personal level, I get over the top sarcastic when I’m frustrated (actually, I’m almost always sarcastic). And sometimes I find it hard not to get frustrated when I hear things aren’t going right for the customer. Whether it’s actually a fault of our own or if the customer has misunderstood some instructions that were provided to them, it gets me pretty riled up. “We must be geniuses if we let that slip by us” and phrases like that are things I’ll mutter under my breath. It’s not positive thinking, but I’m working on it. Of course, I know just who to learn from.

Matt Chang always keeps his cool. Not only is he servicing customers all day, he has to put up with the development team’s crap. He does such an incredible job of it though, which is why I have to call him out. No matter how much effort he has to put into a customer support ticket (even if it’s a really small issue that the customer just really needs help with) he’s calm, collected, and gets them what they need. On the customer side of things, Matt Chang does an excellent job of ensuring that the customer is happy when they’re done talking with him.

That same Matt Chang is also a blessing from the developers’ perspective too. Before having Chang on board, and even in his early days when he was getting on board and learning our products, there would be a lot of back-and-forth with customers. If a support ticket came in, we’d have a lot to figure out. What was the customer seeing? Did they have debug logging on by chance or was there a crash log? Was it reproducible? Did they actually put their license for the product in the right spot? The questions would go on, but of course, Chang would take care of the customer in the end. At this point, Chang is an absolute super star. When he comes up to me to ask about a support issue, he’s already collected the information he needs. Sometimes, he’ll give me a heads up and tell me that he’s already getting the information I’d require, and he’d offer up what he thinks is happening. Hell, at this point in time, Matt Chang will go directly to the person who worked on the feature or previous bug fix to get even more information. He’s quick to get developers the information they need to debug a problem, and that’s absolutely awesome for us.

Tech support used to be invasive for the developers, but it was always handled reasonably well for the customers. Chang has taken it up a notch on both ends and made it relatively pain free for developers to help or look into issues while customers are kept quite pleased with the responses.

Wrappin’ It Up

We’ve received praise from our customers for a long time now that our product, Internet Evidence Finder, makes a big difference in investigations. It’s always amazing to hear that we’re having a positive impact. A more recent trend is that people are raving about our tech support, and there’s no doubt in my mind it’s because Matt Chang delivers the experience they want. Plenty of companies have cool software or software that has a positive impact, but few have superstar customer support to back them.

We knew Chang was going to be awesome from the day we met him, and he hasn’t let us down once. Thanks for being an awesome addition to Team Magnet, Matt. You hold the bar high, always deliver, and do a kick-ass job around the clock. Our hats are off to you.


Halloween – Weekly Article Dump

Halloween at Magnet Forensics

Happy Halloween

Happy Halloween, everyone! I hope those of you who were out and about with your own little ghouls and ghosts had a safe Halloween this year.

Halloween costumes were pretty creative again this year at Magnet Forensics. I tried going with my own Horse Lime attempt, but it’s difficult when not many people know what the Horse Lime actually is. Regardless, my awesome mother put together the lime portion of my costume, and I was extremely grateful for that (and yes, I’m in my mid 20’s. No judging). I think it turned out pretty damn good.

This year, Saige won our Halloween costume contest. As Old Gregg, it was hard for that to not be a sure-fire win. Complete with Bailey’s in hand, I think the only thing that could have made it better was a set of watercolours to go with it. Absolutely awesome job.

On behalf of Team Magnet, Happy Halloween!

Articles

  • Kenneth Cole’s 10 Keys to Success: In this article by Teresa Rodriguez, we get a list of 10 tips from Kenneth Cole on success. While I don’t think there’s anything groundbreakind about them, I do think they’re all relatively straight forward. My main take aways are being innovative, being passionate about what you do, and create value. This article also has a bit of background on Mr. Cole that I wasn’t even aware of, so that was pretty interesting.
  • Community is Everything: How to Build Your Tribe: This article was kind of unique. It doesn’t necessarily apply directly to startups or business, but I see lots of parallels. Miki Agrawal writes about creating a “tribe” or a community of people around you. It’s really about placing positive people in your life, or go-getters in your business for the parallel. Again, no monumental secret tips in here, but it’s a great topic.
  • Performance Recognition: Cutting the Cost of Disengagement: This one is an infographic (and not really an article) about engagement and performance recognition. There are a lot of stats in there, but regardless of whether or not I trust the accuracy, I think the general points made are sound. Essentially, there are a lot of disengaged employeed in the global work force and it hurts productivity. By creating a culture of recognizing performance, you can help boost engagement which has all sorts of positive effects.
  • Code Review Like You Mean It: The first programming article for this week. Phil Haack discusses how to actually code review effectively. One of the key topics is taking breaks from long code reviews so you can maintain focus. Another is forgetting about the author when reviewiing and focusing solely on the code. Phil even put up his own code review checklist and suggests you have your own. Personally, I think I’ve kept a mental one but it probably would help to have it solidified.
  • Converse, Don’t Complain: This article by Hiroshi Mikitani had the most buzz from the things I shared this week. It really seemed to hit home with people, and I imagine it’s for a couple reasons. First of all, if you’re honest with yourself, you probably complain. You probably chat with at least one colleague you’re really close with and just flat out complain with them. You both don’t like something, so you vent. That’s definitely a comforting activity, and sometimes we need it. The flip side is you have authority or responsibility over something that people have problems with. Nobody is voicing any concerns to you (since they are just complaining among themselves) and if they are, there aren’t solutions being brought forward.The first of this two part solution to this is instead of whining, start coming up with potential solutions. It doesn’t matter how big or small your ideas are, start thinking about what a solution might be. The second part is communication. If you want something to get resolved, you need to bring your concerns with potential solutions forward. If you only complain and vent to one person, your concerns won’t be heard. If you only ever whine about something not being correct, then you’re doing a half-assed job at trying to come to a solution.
  • Lead by Example and Emulate Ideal: This one is a plug for my own article. I decided I’d write about why leading by example is actually more powerful than some people think. You have a lot of eyes on you as a leader, and you may not realize it. By leading by example and emulating the attributes you consider ideal, people will catch on to it.
  • Keys to Productivity: I’ve sort of noticed this through my own experiences so far, but early morning and late at night are great times to be productive. When there are a lot of stresses on you during the day, sometimes it feels like you’re not being productive. It doesn’t necessarily mean that you aren’t, but it’s your own perception. Getting a head start on the ay by getting into the office early, or staying up late for your own creative endeavours can prove to feel really rewarding.
  • Build Trust Through Training, Transparency and Trials: I’ve shared articles from this series by Jake Wood before, but this is another standout one for me. Trust isn’t something you can just put into your company values or your mission statement. Trust is something you have to live out each and every day in your organization. We can all say we value it, but if you aren’t willing to live it out, then it’s not something you truly value. One quote I really like from the article is:

    Transparency cannot happen unless your leadership regularly visits the “front lines,” wherever that may be in your business.

  • Here Is What Smart Companies Get That Others Don’t: The first of the three points offered in this article is that smart companies think differently. They are leaders and not followers when it comes to everything they do. The second is that they sell their culture. Their culture is actually core to their business and their organization, not some after thought. The third is that they help others become smarter. Provide value and become something that other people and business want and need to use.
  • Why Good Strategies Often Fall Apart: Ron Ashkenas highlights a few reasons why strategies that look great sometimes just don’t work. The first two points he makes in his article are the ones I want to highlight. The first is passive aggressive disagreement. Not everyone is going to be on board with all parts of all changes, so you’re going to have people that disagree. If the culture does not actively embrace people being able to voice their concerns, it’s difficult to carry out a successful strategy. Individuals might complain, but they wont end up doing anything about it. The second is something along the lines of “being too nice”. Trying to avoid confrontation because you’re afraid of it is a recipe for disaster. If you actually encourage open communication and trust, then being able to have hard discussions about something can be really powerful.
  • Three Things that Actually Motivate Employees: This probably isn’t new to a lot of people, but money (after a certain point) isn’t the driving force for employee motivation. The three things outline in this article are mastery, membership, and meaning. Employees want to be able to mastery their skill sets, learn, and get better at the things they do. Individuals within the organization want to have a sense of community. They want to feel like they align with the people they work with and their working toward a common goal. Employees also want to work on something that has meaning. Work that has a large positive impact is extremely motivating.

Happy Halloween! Remember to follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.

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v6.2 of IEF from Magnet Forensics! – Weekly Article Dump

IEF v6.2 from Magnet Forensics

v6.2 Release: Mobile Forensics Upgrade

I like to be able to use these weekly article dumps for little summaries of what’s going on in my work life, and I think this is a perfect opportunity to acknowledge our latest product update at Magnet Forensics. We just pushed out v6.2 of Internet Evidence Finder and we’re incredibly proud of the work we’ve done. Like any release we have, we pour our hearts into making sure it’s a few big steps forward. We’ve done our best to listen to customers and work with them to address any bugs, but we’re always trying to push the boundaries in our features.

Some of the new offerings in v6.2 of Internet Evidence Finder include:

  • Dynamic App Finder: We now offer a solution for recovering mobile chat applications that we may not have otherwise supported. This is a great discovery tool and has proved to be very powerful even in our early tests. Read more about it here. v6.2’s secret weapon!
  • Chat Threading: Visualize chat threads within our software as they look in their native applications. If you’re looking at a Skype conversation between two or more people, it will show up just like it does from within Skype. A lot less jumping between records to piece together a conversation.
  • L2T CSV Support: L2T CSV files can now be loaded directly into our timeline viewer.
  • Case Merging: Combine multiple IEF cases together or pull in data from TLN/L2T CSV files.
  • More Artifacts: v6.2 is no different than previous releases when it comes to adding new artifacts!
    • AVI carving
    • Hushmail
    • TOR chat
    • Flash cookies
    • Offline gmail
    • Additional Chrome support
    • … and more.

If you’re a forensic investigator, v6.2 is going to be an awesome upgrade or addition to your suite of tools. If you’re not, then check out Magnet Forensics to see what we’re all about and so proud of what we do. Congrats to Magnet on an awesome release of v6.2!

Articles

  • In praise of micromanagement: I’m still very early on in my career, so it’s difficult for me to have an opinion on this article and back it up. It’s a bit controversial, so of course I want to take the other side and disagree with it.There’s that, and I have some discomfort when it comes to Apple so I like to turn off when I see articles on Apple or Steve Jobs. Regardless, I thought that there was an interesting perspective in this piece to share, and maybe even if I can’t see it right now, others would benefit from reading through it. Is there a place for micromanagement? Can it be done right? Are people like Steve Jobs just an exception to an otherwise good rule?
  • The Myth of the Rockstar Programmer: Scott Hanselman says that rockstar programmers don’t exist–rockstar teams do. I completely agree. When your company is so small that you essentially don’t have teams, this might not hold. Maybe you have three developers and each one is a rockstar in their own right. That’s probably a it different. More often than not, you’re not working with one or two people developing a product for a company. It’s not about having one rockstar with all the programming super-powers take charge on the team. It’s about creating a team where everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses and then organizing them to operate at full efficiency. Teams. Not individuals.
  • Strengthen and Sustain Culture with Storytelling: This is an article that I can really align myself with. Nancy Duarte writes about something that’s often lost when small startups are transitioning into small businesses. It’s entirely possible some companies don’t even make it out of the start up phase because this thing is already going south. Storytelling. It’s important to be able to share stories with people as you bring them on board to your company. They need to know where the company has been and how it’s gotten to where it is. New hires need to feel like their part of the family as they are brought on board, and without conveying your company’s mission and values properly you start to lose that alignment.
  • Ignoring Your Test Suite: Another programming article here, but this post by Jesse Taber has some deeper lessons to be learned, in my opinion. The article talks about something not all programmers do, but should: write code that tests their code. This lets developers catch problems early on (because catching a problem now might cost a bit of time, but catching the problem later could be devastating). Running code tests regularly is a process that allows you to ensure the foundation of your software product is structurally sound. But what happens when you have flaky tests? What happens when you introduce a new failure and don’t bother to fix it? After all, you have 3000 tests, and you know why test ABC is failing anyway. Don’t put processes in place just for the sake of having them. Everything you do should be done for a reason, because your business doesn’t have time for anything else. Don’t enable poor habits. If you’re noticing problems in your process, identify why they are happening and look to get them fixed. Maybe you need to adjust your process because it doesn’t fit anymore.
  • Cameron Sapp – Recognizing The New Guy: This one is from me. I wrote up a little recognition piece about a colleague and teammate, Cam Sapp. I want to be able to write more recognition posts, but I started with Cam. He’s been a great addition to our team both from a technical and work culture perspective. All of Magnet is glad to have him on board.
  • Don’t Work For Your Boss, Work For Your Company: I thought that Ilya Pozin had written something great when I cam across this article. Hierarchies in the workplace can often cause disconnect and disengage employees. So why do we have them? I’m not against hierarchies–I think they serve a purpose. However, I think necessary measures need to be put in place to ensure that hierarchies aren’t detracting from the company’s goals. In this article, Ilya says to not work for your boss. Your goals at work should not be to satisfy individuals or only do things for your boss so you can get your promotion. Align yourself to the company values and the mission of the company. You’ll remain engaged and happy to do the work you’re doing. In the end, if you’re not happy doing work that’s aligned with your company’s mission, vision, and values, you might be in the wrong place.
  • Creativity and the Role of the Leader: This article discusses where ideas come from and how leaders fit in to the grand scheme of things. The traditional mindset is that ideas come from the top and then are pushed down to employees to carry out the work necessary for bringing the idea to fruition. However, it’s increasingly more common where ideas are actually generated by employees, and it’s the responsibility of the leader for nurturing idea creation and ensuring that ideas that are aligned with the company’s mission can succeed.
  • Will Your Firm Endure?: In this article by Tim Williams, I took away two key points. In order for your business to be absolutely sure it can endure, everyone needs to be viewed as replaceable. I don’t mean in the sense where we can trade John for Joe and not care because we don’t value human qualities, I mean strictly from the skills and responsibility aspect. There shouldn’t be instanced in your business where if an individual were to disappear one day your company wouldn’t be able to carry on. The next is acknowledging strengths and weaknesses. When people have some obvious strengths, they have weak areas too. There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s normal. Make sure your teams are constructed of people with complementary skills.
  • Dynamic Programming with Python and C#: Another article from me, and another programming related post. This my follow up to a post about C# and Python integration that seems to have been received really well. It was a cool little experiment for me to take Python and C# and have them working together in my favourite IDE, but on top of that, I was actually able to learn a bit about C#’s “dynamic” keyword which was new for me. If you’re familiar with either of C# or Python I recommend checking it out. There’s some pretty cool stuff you can do, and I’ve only scratched the surface.
  • To Find Success, Forget Your PrioritiesClaire Diaz-Ortiz says that priorities are too general. We all have priorities, but how many of us are seeing ourselves achieve what we’d like? Claire suggests forgetting your priorities and breaking them down into goals you can achieve. By having conrete action plans, you can execute them properly.
  • Personality Tests: Modern-Day Phrenology: Ron Baker shares his perspective on why personality tests don’t have a place at work. He goes as far as calling them meaningless, but I believe his main argument is that simply siloing people into personality types is pointless. To that end, I agree. I thought this article had great timing because I’ve been discussing personality tests with our HR manager at work. I came across this article right before doing a personality test with her and we decided a few things. Firstly, if the results of the test don’t make sense, then don’t go any further with it. This means that either the test you’re using is flawed or perhaps you don’t understand the test. Regardless, how can you take action on something you don’t understand? We both agreed that simply identifying traits was useless on it’s own, so I think we agreed with Ron on this one, but we weren’t stopping there. The basic act of identifying personality traits had us sparking conversations about how our personalities were different and how acknowledging these differences could influence our interactions. Essentially, it was hard to just silo ourselves into a particular personality type without thinking about and acting on what we were observing. In the end, identifying personality types and sticking someone into some cookie-cutter process for it means nothing. The tests are all about ganining insight and understanding so that we can choose where to go from there.
  • How Open Should a Startup CEO Be with Staff?: Coming from a startup, this was another interesting article. Mark Suster writes a semi-controversial perspective about CEO transparency. The norm is that expecting CEO’s to share every bit of details with the employees achieved perfect transparency and makes everything better. Mark says this definitely isn’t the case and provides some excellent examples where total transparency came back to bite. It’s all about balance. Transparency is great,but total transparency is often too much for most employees to handle on a day-to-day basis.

Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.

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Cameron Sapp – Recognizing The New Guy

 

 

Cameron Sapp (Rocking awesome handlebars for Movember)

Cameron Sapp and a Little Background

A couple weeks ago I mentioned that I wanted to start publicly acknowledging some of my teammates. While this is the first one, it certainly won’t be the last. At Magnet Forensics, I’m surrounded by many individuals that bring a lot to the table. There’s certainly no reason and no way I’d only be able to pick one person to write about. Now there wasn’t a particular reason I picked this individual first, but I think I had some concrete things fresh in my head that I wanted to share. Without too much more rambling, I’d like to introduce Cameron Sapp!

New Kid on the Block

Cameron joined our team earlier this year. I don’t think any of us doubted his technical abilities and we were all excited to bring him on board. After all, we have a ton of stuff to work on and we need more great minds working with us! We were getting pretty impatient waiting for him to start, but it was definitely worth the wait.

Cam fit in to the work culture really well and really quickly too. Heck, he’s one of Team Magnet’s awesome volleyball players! Something people may not pay attention to is how much a work culture fit is important in a small organization. Being able to get along with all of your teammates and share a common vision is absolutely crucial for being successful. Luckily for us, Cameron fits in well with the team and definitely embraces the Magnet culture!

I was recently told by a bright individual, Dan Silivestru of tinyHippos, that there will be a time where someone younger is going to show up and surprise me with what they know. Of course, it’s not that I walk around doubting the ability of people, but unfortunately it’s pretty common for age and/or experience to bring about big assumptions for people’s abilities. I’m still young and early in my career, so I don’t think age is something I’m concerned with–but I might be guilty of thinking highly of my technical abilities. While Cameron isn’t the first, and certainly won’t be the last, he definitely was able to pull some tricks from his sleeves to impress me. For that, I would like to applaud him and recognize him here on The Internetz.

Whatcha Gonna Do With All Them Lambdas?

I’ve been programming in Microsoft’s C# for quite a few years now. I’m certainly not a master by any stretch of the imagination, but I’d say I’m pretty well versed. I’ve also written in the past about how I like to use events a lot when I’m programming (like here, here, and here) and almost always try to find an event-driven approach to things. But what does this have to do with Mr Cameron Sapp?

Well, you see… In C# it’s often the case where you hook up events like this:


someObject.DidSomething += SomeObject_DidSomething;

private void SomeObject_DidSomething(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // do some awesome stuff.
}

That’s not so bad, right? Well, except if you’re making these suckers everywhere… And when you don’t want to have to type out a big ugly signature… Or when the type of your event arguments is obnoxiously long… Well, you get the point. If you’re not a C# programmer, take my word for it: if you use events a lot, having these event handlers all over the place sometimes just sucks to have to look at.

Enter… The lambda.

So once upon a time, Cameron stuck up a code review. Things were looking pretty good (as per usual with Cam’s code), but I noticed something right before I was going to give it the stamp of approval.


// Some code...

someClass.SomeEvent += (s, e) =>
{
    // event handler logic
}

// Some more code...

What the heck is that?! My alarms for event handler memory leaks weren’t going off (since this handler needed to exist for the entire lifetime of the objects in question), but I had no idea what I was looking at. Cameron’s a pretty smart guy, I remember thinking, so this code definitely had to compile on his machine before he pushed it up for me to review. Still… What was I looking at?

This was my first real shocker where someone caught me off guard for something I always felt really comfortable with. I mean… C# and events are my bread and butter. How was this guy showing me something I hadn’t seen before regarding events? How can he know something about them I don’t?! Well, he did it. And I’m sure that he’s got a lot more up there in that head of his that I don’t know. And I can’t wait for him to teach me it!

Summary

So this was pretty quick, and it probably doesn’t do Cameron enough justice, but I think it’s a start. We’re really fortunate to have Cameron as part of our team–both from a culture fit and a technical perspective. He’s a rock solid developer that is not only willing to adapt to our coding environment, but he’s also got lots of insight to bring to the table.

It’s important that we never put ourselves in a position where we think we know it all. As soon as you get comfortable with what you know, you stop learning. When you stop learning, you have people like Cameron show up and send you a wake up call. There isn’t a single person out there who knows everything, and you might be surprised who can teach you a thing or two.

Thanks for being part of our team, Cam. Let’s show ’em how it’s done.

More team member recognition to come! Stay tuned.


Recognition – Weekly Article Dump

Recognition - Weekly Article Dump (Image from http://www.sxc.hu/)

Recognition – Weekly Article Dump

Not all of the articles this week touch on recognition, and to be honest, I didn’t pick it as a theme for the articles either. Recognition is more a topic of discussion that’s come up over the last week at Magnet Forensics, where I work. Being a team lead and part of the management team at Magnet, I’m often part of conversations about motivation. Providing recognition is an excellent way to motivate your staff and shows that you truly appreciate them. We’ve been trying to get better at recognizing staff for doing an awesome job–especially because we have so many awesome people working with us. It’s pretty obvious with our Profit Hot 50 placement that we’ve got some kick-ass people.

Recognition, whether it’s one-on-one or in a public setting, has a huge impact. I don’t even mean recognition in the form of compensation (e.g. bonus or salary raise). Just giving someone recognition for the awesome work they’ve done–plain and simple. It’s a great way to let someone know that their hard work and commitment isn’t going unnoticed. Sure, if they’re developing products, making sales, or acquiring leads there are certain metrics that indicate they’re doing a great job, but recognition is that additional feedback you can provide to really drive the point home. It motivates people and often has a bigger impact than providing compensation.

I want to make a conscious effort to try and recognize some of my colleagues on Dev Leader, going forward, when the opportunity presents itself. I’m always learning from the people I work with and there’s always something great I can say about them. Why not give them a public acknowledgement?

I also have a little surprise coming from a friend and colleague of mine, Tayfun Uzun, early next week, so keep your eyes open for that!

Articles

  • Job Titles and Responsibilities: Last week I wrote about my thoughts on the true role of job titles. As soon as you start to look at your job title as something that defines your limits, you’re on the wrong path. Your job title should define what you’re responsible for, but it’s by no means supposed to put limits on what you can do. Check it out and let me know what you think! Do you feel like job titles should keep people to only a certain set of tasks? Do you feel like having set responsibilities is useful at all?
  • How Strong Is Your Bench: Having a successful company is all about having the right people on board. Sylvia Hewlett writes about what it means to have a rock solid roster within your company. Some of the things include avoiding hiring clones of people exactly like yourself and instead trying to diversify the skill sets within your company. Absolutely true!
  • 8 Steps for Engineering Leaders to Keep the Peace: There seems to be a natural tendency for engineers or people implementing components of a product to push back on product managers or people who decide how a product/service should be. Steven Sinofsky discusses the importance of being an effective engineering leader and ensuring proper communication between engineering leaders and people like PMs or founders. Open and transparent communication is key and helps remind the other party that you do in fact have the same end-goal.
  • Top Tips To Being a Great Mentor: In this article, James Caan provides four key points for being a better mentor. Patience, honesty, positivity, and focus are the four pillars that James describes. Patience and honesty, in my opinion, are the most important but I certainly agree with all four!
  • Leading a Customer-Centric Transformation: Hopefully it’s not surprising, but customers are what your business should be geared toward. As a result, it makes sense that leading customer-centric employees would be beneficial. Don Peppers outlines six things to focus on to make this transformation necessary. It ties in with my post on avoiding organizational silos.
  • The Dark Side Of Software Development That No One Talks About: Don’t be scared that this article mentions software development if you’re not a programmer! It touches on some great points about having a career in software development, so even if you’re not a developer yourself, it sheds some light on some more broad issues. John Sonmez writes about why software developers seem like jerks sometimes and what you can do about it. It seems to boil down to intelligence being a deciding factor for how well you program, so lording your intelligence over other people makes you superior. And because our own intelligence is something we all hold personally, we can get defensive about it pretty easily. John suggests that part of the solution is trying to simplify aspects of software development.
  • How to Win Loyalty From Other People: To be a successful leader, the people you lead need to be loyal to you. Deepak Chopra writes about seven suggestions for building up loyalty and among them “abstaining from disloyalty” is one of my favourites. If you act differently behind people’s backs compared to when you’re leading them, it may come back to bite you later. It’s also crucial to pay attention to each individual’s personal differences to ensure they feel understood.
  • Strategies for Dealing with Randomness in BusinessDon Peppers twice on the list this week! Things in life and business aren’t always predictable for us. It’s just how things are. Are you properly set up to deal with uncertainty in your business though? Remain agile!
  • 10 Quotes All Entrepreneurs Should Memorize: How about some quotes to motivate you? Joel Peterson lists 10 great quotes for entrepreneurs, but I think they carry over to anyone working in a startup. Don’t be afraid to fail and keep moving forward to improve!
  • The Two Biggest Distractions – And What to Do About Them: Distractions are ever-increasing in the workplace, but have you ever considered the differences between the different types of distractions? Daniel Goleman discusses two very different types of distractions: sensory and emotional. I hadn’t really noticed it, but often we find ourselves consciously trying to avoid sensory distractions. If our phone lights up or we get an email notification, we either give in or we make an effort to try and reduce the effect of these distractions. But an emotional distraction is much worse. If something tweaks your emotions the wrong way at work, it often has a bigger impact and it’s usually unexpected.

My take away point for this week regarding recognition: Do it early and do it often. Remember to follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week!

Nick Cosentino – LinkedIn
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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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