Tag: risk

There’s Nothing Wrong With Failing

Fail!

Failure to Communicate

So this post will be pretty short, but I wanted to quickly touch on a workplace experience that happened the other day. I was approached by a colleague (who’s perspective I really value) about the way some of us on the team were discussing a series of events. This individual was really concerned that we kept calling it a failure, and in this person’s mind, we hadn’t truly failed at anything. We had done an experiment in terms of tackling a development problem and the team had reached a critical mass where we declared “enough is enough, this is a failure”. I became concerned because I wanted to make sure this person and I were on the same page.

I couldn’t totally wrap my ahead around why this person was so concerned about calling it a failure. In my opinion, all the evidence was there to call it a failure! But I guess that was just a failure on my part to communicate properly. I think that there was a work culture gap where this person was viewing our declaration of a failure as something really negative, whereas a lot of us were really just marking it as a point of realization to not continue along with something. All of the reasons this person offered up for why our experiment was not a failure were true. We hadn’t missed a deadline to ship and we had a plan for how to work around it. That sounds like success, right?

I guess the communication breakdown was really this: There’s nothing wrong with failing. We tried something and we’ve identified that it’s not working. That’s a failure. What makes us successful? Being able to identify our failures, learn from them, and improve going forward. And that’s exactly what we’re doing. Acknowledging a failure and planning how we can be better next time around.

So with that said… You should be failing when you push the boundaries. Just make sure you learn from your failures.


Happy St. Patty’s Day – Weekly Article Dump

Happy St. Patty's Day - Weekly Article Dump (Image by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Happy St. Patty’s Day!

I hope everyone who was celebrating St. Patrick’s Day was able to not only have fun but stay safe doing so. Of course, when there is drinking associated with a holiday it can be easy to get carried away. It’s always a great idea to have driving arrangements or the option to sleep at a friend’s place set up before you head out to celebrate.

This year I was able to celebrate with a handful of my university friends that I don’t get to see as often as I’d like. I haven’t been drinking much at all now for nearly half a year, so I stuck to my one Irish coffee to meet my liquor allowance. We all had a blast discussing where our lives have taken us so far, and it’s great to see everyone doing so well. I was excited to hear that more people are hoping to relocate into or closer to Waterloo!

Happy (belated) St. Patty’s Day everyone, and I hope the recovery has gone smoothly today.

Articles

  • Empower Your Visionaries: Steve Faktor talks to us about who the visionaries are in your company and why you should be empowering them. Steve says that the visionaries within our organizations are frustrated by bureaucracy and will often leave to go start their own Next-Big-Thing. So what should we be doing with them? What can we do with them? Well… challenge them! Challenge them to make their radical ideas a reality. Extend the boundaries you’ve placed on them so that they can try to make their vision a reality and make them feel comfortable with the possibility of failure. Wouldn’t it be great if they’re next big thing was the next big thing for your organization?
  • Don’t Forget Me! Ensuring Distributed Team Members Aren’t Left Out: In this article, Gary Swart touches on how to make sure remote employees are kept engaged. Working remotely can be difficult not only for the person offsite, but for the people that are supposed to interface with the person offsite. Timezone differences, cultural differences (i.e. different holidays, for example), and the fact that you can’t interact in person are all things that make remote team members a lot trickier to work with. Gary suggests using the ICE (Identify, Clarify, and Extend) principle, which he outlines in his post. He also suggests using things like video conferencing so that you can pick up more on body language when you’re meeting remotely and even ensuring that you try to keep your technology homogeneous so that information can be shared easily.
  • Inspire Creativity at Work With All 5 of Your Senses: A good friend of mine shared this with me the other day, and I thought it was worth passing along. Many people don’t pay attention to it, but if you work a traditional office job, you spend a lot of time in the office. Even if you can get a little boost from your environment, it can potentially go a long way over time. This mashable is an infographic about how different colors and ambience in the office can be used to enhance (or restrict) different aspects of your thinking and interaction. If your work environment isn’t playing into your senses, you may be missing out on a positive effect!
  • Great leaders aren’t afraid to take risks: According to Alex Malley, risk taking is a very important part of leadership. He has a handful of suggestions for gearing yourself up for taking risks in your leadership role such as separating the personal aspect of failure from your role. If you’ve set yourself up with talented people, you have open communication with your manager, and you’re prepared for the “worst case”, then you should feel more comfortable taking risks.
  • The complete guide to listening to music at work: I’ve personally given up on listening to music at work during core hours due to the nature of my role (I’ve been told this is “humblebragging“, but realistically I’m just making myself more approachable). However, when I’m cranking through some development work on my own and I know I’m not going to be approached by anyone, I love to turn up some tunes. I thought Adam Pasick had a pretty cool write up about the different aspects of listening to music at work. Essentially, different styles of music may be better for different tasks at work.  I think it’s worth a read if one of the first things you do when you get into the office is strap on your headphones!

Thanks for reading! Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.


Be a Better Programmer – Weekly Article Dump

Be a Better Programmer - Weekly Article Dump (Image by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Be a Better Programmer

It’s a new year and that means it’s all about resolutions, right? Well, I’m not a huge fan of keeping around a resolution that needs to wait for a new year, but I am a fan of reflecting on your goals and your skills. If you’re a programmer like me, then maybe this will be a great starting point. In my weekly article dumps I usually would just provide a couple of comments on a link like this, but I felt I should dive in a little bit more. You can find the original article by Amy Jollymore over here. Please have a look! I shared it with the whole dev team at Magnet Forensics because I felt there was a little bit of something for everyone.

Number one on this list, and perhaps the one I’d personally like to focus on more out of this list, is checking your code before blaming others. Blaming other people–in general, not just programming–is an easy way out. When a problem occurs, it’s simple to assume that all of your work is right and that it must be someone else’s fault. But if everyone starts thinking like this, it turns into a nasty blame war. So next time the build breaks or your shiny new feature stops working as expected, don’t go blaming other people. Investigate what the problem is. See what your most recent changes were and if they could have caused the problem. As you start to gain confidence that your changes aren’t responsible for the issue, try sitting down with one or two other people you think might have been around the problem area recently–But don’t go accusing them! Putting your heads together to figure out the problem can speed up the process and might even shed some light on some miscommunication over a design or some assumptions in the code that don’t actually hold true. It’s a lot more embarrassing to blame someone when it’s actually your fault compared to putting in the effort and admitting you might have goofed up. Try it out!

Number two is also a great item. You should never put an end to your learning… especially as an individual in a technology space. There are so many great suggestions listed for this point that there’s no point in me repeating them. Just go read them! An interesting point worth mentioning is using podcasts for learning. This is a great option if you find you’re brain is still spinning when you lay down in bed or if you have a long commute to work (or something else you’re involved in). The author also mentions that you don’t need to be learning programming… What about domain expertise? If you’re writing code for banks, lawyers, or digital forensics… Why  not learn about that too?!

The last point I’ll touch on from the article is number three: don’t be afraid to break things. I love this point. If you’re working on a big piece of software, there are almost certainly areas that seem brittle, scary, or just plain incomprehensible. If your project is still small, it very well get to this point. It doesn’t mean that the code is bad or that you’re working with the worst programmers… It’s just something that happens when you’re continuously trying to build on your software. The real problem occurs when nobody is willing to take the time to go change things. If you have big scary brittle parts of code, then set aside some time, take a deep breath, and go refactor it! It might seem like hell at first, but once you get into it (and especially after it’s done) you’ll feel a million times better. Plus, now your code can continue to be built upon without people running in fear when you mention that section of code. Code can get nasty, but consider using a “tech debt” system or regularly set aside time for refactoring parts of your code base.

Again, the original article is located at: 7 Ways to be a Better Programmer in 2014. Check it out!

Articles

  • How to Manage Dynamic Tensions — and Master the Balancing Act: This was an interesting article on some parts of leadership that often oppose each other. Author Chris Cancialosi does an excellent job in discussing balance between internal and external influences as well as leading and managing. A good take away from this article is at least acknowledging that there are certainly some things to balance. You may want to have the most flexible team, but have you considered if there’s a “too flexible”? Just a bit of perspective that this article might bring to light.
  • A Crash Course In Leadership For 20-Something CEOs: Barry Salzberg‘s article is geared toward young CEOs, but I think that means we can apply the lessons to anyone looking to lead! A few of the points I’d like to mention include being tough on problems and not on people. Your people are the one’s who are going to solve problems and bring great ideas to the table. They’ll invest their time into your organization in order to accomplish great things–so don’t be hard on them. Instead, acknowledge that your problems and challenges are the things you want to crush, and work with your team to make sure you conquer every challenge that gets in the way of your goal. Another point is on taking risks. Never taking risks is a great way to stagnate. You need to learn from your failures, but keep pushing the boundaries. Finally, be ready to adapt. As your organization grows or as the market you’re working within evolves, you need to be ready to adapt and change. You might get lucky and things don’t change all that much over a long period of time, but the odds of that are pretty low. Be ready to adapt so when the time comes, you don’t need to worry about everything falling apart.
  • Leading at Scale with Agility: Brad Smith has a few great points on what leading a team should encompass. First, a team should have a goal that it is trying to achieve. If that team is part of a larger organization, the team’s goal should align with the goal of the entire organization. Secondly, decisions for the team should involve those on the team. It’s easy to sit back and speculate what might be best, but why not involve the people directly affected? Of course, this is more difficult for large teams but maybe that’s an indication your teams would be more effective if they were smaller. Next, empower teams to arrive at solutions on their own. If a plan worked out well, try communicating it to others to try out. Conversely, if the plan had some problems, let others on the team (or other teams) know about the hurdles. Finally, Brad has a point on trust. Trust is arguably one of the most important parts of leading a team. Each team member needs to be able to trust the others. There should be an easy assumption that everyone is operating with best intentions.
  • For Leaders, Today is History: In this article by Steven Thompson, he gives a high-level overview of his focus. Specifically, he focuses on the future and not right now. Steven says the teams he is in charge of are often looking at the problems of “right now” and perhaps a little bit in the future. It would be counter productive for him to try and butt-in to try helping with those problems because he’s so far removed from them. Instead, those individuals have been empowered to focus on those problems. Instead, Steven focuses on the future–the direction of the teams. As a leader, it’s important to try and be thinking at least one step ahead.
  • What If You Had to Write a “User Manual” About Your Leadership Style?: After I read Adam Bryant‘s article, I thought the idea of a leadership “user manual” would be pretty cool. Even if there isn’t a single other individual who would benefit from it, at least it would help reveal to myself some of my leadership quirks. That’s useful on it’s own! I’ll be sure to post up my leadership “user manual” when I have it complete… and I imagine I’ll have to keep updating it over time as my style evolves. It’ll be really interesting to see the evolution of my leadership style! Why not consider doing one for yourself?
  • What Bosses Should Never Ask Employees to Do: Jeff Haden‘s article was a little bit controversial in my opinion–and in the opinion of some of the commenters. I think I get the underlying message behind a lot of what Jeff is saying for each of his points, but as one commenter said, it sounds like a bit of a personal complaint the whole way through. Consider the topic of donating to charities at work. The feel I get after reading that segment is that your organization should not attempt to do fundraising through employees. While I don’t actually think that’s what Jeff is saying, that’s how I feel after reading it. I know that we’ve been able to do several charity events at Magnet, and we’ve always said that they are completely voluntary. I think that’s the crucial part. It’s the holiday season and your budget is a bit tight? How could anyone get mad at you for backing out of a completely optional charity donation? Busy with some personal matters or want to focus on finishing up something at work the day we’re doing a charity event? No big deal, it’s optional. Anyway, the point is that perhaps based on the wording in the article, I felt like some of the messaging will be misinterpreted. I think there are some good points buried in there. Check it out and let me know if you agree or not!

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Migration – Weekly Article Dump

Migration - Weekly Article Dump

Migration: Bye to the Pi

Well… it happened. If you checked in earlier this week, you might have noticed Dev Leader was completely down on Thursday. Quite a bummer… but the show must go on. Migration to a new host was necessary, but that wasn’t without some hiccups.

For me, having a site hosted was still a pretty new process. I had tried it a couple of times before, but running a web server that I controlled always felt better. Just more control I suppose. Migration started off sort of sour where I was required to re-install WordPress on my host a few times due to some technical difficulties… And of course, it was hard to sit still while I knew my site was down. Once I finally had WordPress launched, the only part of the migration that went smooth was having a backup of my site four hours before it went down. Talk about timing!

There’s silver lining in everything though, and this little migration blip was no different. My Raspberry Pi was a fun little box, but it wasn’t fast by any stretch of the imagination. Page loading times were a bit slow, and serving images could sometimes be terrifyingly slow. Now that the site is hosted, there should be a very noticeable performance improvement. Additionally, with the new host comes some additional reliability! That’s always awesome.

See? Migration wasn’t so bad after all, I guess! My list of things for any WordPress user to be doing regularly:

  • Back up your posts
  • Back up your comments if your readers are actively engaged in discussions
  • Back up the media you use on your blog
  • Export your plugin settings
  • Keep a list of plugins you have running

Even if you don’t have a plan for host migration any time in the near future, it’s always good to have the “worst case scenario” covered. The plugin BackWPup covers basically everything I mentioned above, so I’d recommend getting that setup if you don’t have any backup plan currently in place!

Articles

  • Feedback is the Breakfast of Champions: 10 Tips for Doing it Right: Anyone in a leadership position knows just how valuable being able to provide feedback is. Heck, anyone who is driven to improve themself craves feedback. Joel Peterson provides an awesome list of tips for being able to provide feedback. I’d say frequency, positivity, and confidentiality are among the top take away points from his list.
  • 10 ways to make your .NET projects play nice with others: First programming article in the list this week. I thought this one stood out because I think anyone working in a team has either heard some (most) of these or is trying to work through them. Troy Hunt has put together a list of 10 things that any developer working in a team should be conscious of to make sure their code plays well with their teammates. Number one on the list is the same as my number one. “Works on my machine” carries no validity. Why? Your customers don’t have your computer. It’s a frequent thing when working with the QA team and developers want to cover their butts… But it won’t cut it!
  • Only 13 percent of people worldwide actually like going to work: Had to share this one, because if the stat is real, it’s scary. It’s scary to think that almost 90% of people that go to work don’t actually like going. In Jena McGregor‘s article, this low rate is attributed to poor working conditions, job availability, and job engagement. On the bright side for us North Americans, we’re a bit higher at just under 30%. That’s still far too low for something we spend a majority of our lives doing. It’s important to find a company you can get behind, and I definitely lucked out with Magnet.
  • The New Science of Who Sits Where at WorkRachel Feintzeig shared an interesting article about seating in the workplace. I’ve shared some articles before about open concept offices and that I do enjoy working in them, but the seating perspective is pretty interesting. For example, changing your org hierarchy is one thing but unless people are changing their daily interactions, it won’t have that big of an effect. However, if seating arrangements are responsible for 40-60% of people’s daily interactions, simply moving people around will really stir the pot.
  • What is the Biggest Mistake Managers Make?: In John Murphy‘s article, he points out something that is probably less obvious than it should be. The biggest mistake a manager can make is focusing on the wrong things. He provides some steps to help align managers with the goals of their company to ensure that focus is in the necessary areas.
  • 8 strategies for successful culture change: Culture is something that is dynamic and always evolving within a company, but often there are things that are core to the company culture. What happens when you need to make some work culture changes? Michelle Smith shares some tips on how to approach a work culture shift.
  • Why Inspiring Leaders Don’t Sweat: Here was an article that hit home with me because I’m guilty of it. Panicking. Why is it bad if you’re panicking in a leadership position? The biggest problem is that your teammates will pick up on it and switch to a panick state too. It’s incredibly demotivating, and it’s usually at a time when motivation and inspiration is truly needed. In Steven Thompson‘s post, he talks about how and why to keep calm and lead on.
  • 3 Proven Ways to Make Tough Job Decisions: Jennifer Dulski discusses three approaches for helping make tough life and career decisions. At some point or another, most of us will be faced with making a decision in our career path that’s going to be difficult–difficult for you to decide or difficult for you to explain to those you’re close to. I think the “Sit With” approach is my favourite of the three.
  • 4 Ways to Have a Life Outside Your Business: This one should probably hit home with anyone working in a startup or running a business. Alexa von Tobel shares four tips for how to have a life outside of work and why having a life outside of work is necessary to be successful. I think something that’s often overlooked (somehow) is “me time”. I’m guilty of it too, but you get to a point when you’re not doing anything just for yourself. It’s great to be dedicated to your company and be passionate about your work, but it’s also importnt to step back, take a breath, and do something just for you.
  • 17 Things The Boss Should Never Say: Dave Kerpen has another great article on what not to say–this time from the boss’s perspective. Some of the worst ones in my opinion? Telling your teammates it’s only their problem (or not yours, at least) or being adamant about not evolving your perspective/processes. Some gems in there from quite a few business owners.
  • 9 Lessons From the World’s Best Mentors: This one is pretty quick from Chester Elton, but there’s a few different perspectives shared in here. Sone key points in my opinion are ensuring that you’re doing what you can to help others and not getting paralyzed by risk.
  • Key Reasons Delegating Is SO Difficult and What To Do About It: Most new managers and leaders have this problem. How do you delegate work? Perhaps you acquired your management or leadership position because you proved that technically you were very capable in your position. So how do you get others to do work you think you could be doing? Judith Sherven shares some insight on why being able to delegate is an incredibly important skill as a leader. After all, being able to grow as a leader means being able to effectively delegate responsibilities.
  • Want Greater Employee Engagement? Develop Intrapreneurs: In this article, Larry Myler talks about increasing employee engagement by developing intrapreneurs within your organization. It’s inline with what Tayun’s guest post was about the other week. Provide people autonomy and let them execute on their strengths. It’s a sure-fire way to increase engagement.

That’s it for this week! Hopefully there won’t be any more emergency host migrations any time in the near future (or ever again). Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.

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Innovation: Weekly Article Dump

Innovation: Weekly Article Dump (Image by http://www.sxc.hu/)

Innovation and You

There’s no denying innovation is important. You often see startups oozing with innovation completely disrupt a market and consequently, there are tons of people out there with dreams to do the same thing. How do you jack up the innovation level in your company? Why is it that startups seem to be so much better at innovating even though multi-million dollar companies have the people and financial resources to throw at R&D? Why do big companies suck at innovating?

The answer starts with your employees. Empowering your employees to innovate and embedding innovation in the work culture is key to ensuring your company continues to innovate. With big companies, the focus moves from innovation to profit maximization. Over time though, some small team of highly innovative individuals are going to find a way to do it differently or do it better, and the big players will take a hit.

Where does your company sit in the world of innovation? Does innovation come from a select few individuals?

Articles

  • Driving Innovation: This article is all about how to truly drive innovation in your company: It doesn’t come from one person, but rather many people. Arne Sorenson shares five tips for trying to drive innovation among his team members. Coincidentally, my colleague Tayfun actually wrote an innovation piece on a similar topic earlier this week.
  • Are Headphones the New Cubicle?: I thought this post by Richard Moran was pretty interesting and at least worst asking yourself the question (even if you don’t feel like reading the article). Open offices are seemingly the new way to go, but are the benefits of open offices reduced by everyone strapping headphones on? I’m personally a big fan of having an open concept office, but I do think that open communication factor is significantly hurt by having headphones on all day.
  • How to Spot a Great Leader in Four Easy Steps: James Caan says that great leaders are defined by four major things: confidence, intuition, decisiveness, and empathy. I have to agree. People need a leader they can get behind and trust to make good decisions. That leader needs to show confidence when they are making their decisions to really show that they aren’t blindly leading people down path X. However, the empathy part goes really far. After all, you’re dealing with real live people, not machines.
  • Intrapreneurship – Guest Blog by Tayfun Uzun: I’ve already briefly mentioned it here in this post, but my colleague Tayfun from Magnet Forensics wrote his perspective on intrapreneurship and how it drives innovation. It’s all about empowering each individual in the company to be innovative in their own right, and in return, the company itself experiences a boost in innovation. Check it out!
  • University of Waterloo Grad’s Journey To Becoming A Software Engineer: Here’s the part where I toot my own horn a bit. A friend of mine, Meghan Greaves, did a mini-interview with me for a TalentEgg article. It’s about how and when I knew what I wanted to do when I “grew up”, what university in Waterloo was like for me, and my transition into a development leadership role at Magnet Forensics. It was really flattering to have Meghan put this together, so please check it out and give her a shout out on twitter!
  • New Generation of Business: Connecting Employee Loyalty with Customer Loyalty: In this post by Colin Shaw, he dives into the concept of employee ambassadors and how you can build a better business by marrying employee and customer loyalty. Keeping employees engaged through your employee ambassadors will help keep the rest of your employees engaged and believing in the company’s mission.
  • Just Do it – Right from the Start!: Michael Skok provides a high-level walkthrough for startup success. The first thing? The right people. A successful company absolutely requires the right people and that’s where it starts. Keeping a solid workplace culture and empowering your employees are two fundamental things to do as you bring the right people on board. Great article!
  • Look for Advisors Who Can Teach, Not Tell: Hunter Walk shares some advice that certainly makes sense for advisory boards, but I wouldn’t limit it to just that. The idea of being able to teach and not just tell is a parallel to great leadership. Telling people what to do is not as effective as telling people what the goal is and empowering them to get there. It’s much easier to learn and grow if you’re given guidelines but you get to hold the reins.
  • Using Humor in Business: Some Practical AdviceColin Shaw is up again this week with an article on humour in business. I think it’s pretty common that when people think of big corporations they have this vision of straight-faced people in suits carrying brief cases… but is that always the reality? Should it be the reality? Colin talks about how you can leverage humour in the workplace for things such as improving relationships or making ideas more memorable. There’s certainly a balance, but I think Colin doe sa great job explaining it.
  • The # 1 Job of a Leader Is …: If you have grammar OCD then skip to the next link right now. Fair warning! Tom Hood says that to be a true leader, you need to be doing “more better”. What does it mean? It’s simple… do better, only more! Okay, maybe it still sounds kind of strange, but the idea still applies. In order to be a real leader in your domain, you have to keep doing better. You need to innovate, push boundaries, and keep doing things better. Do better than your competitors, and do better than you did in the past.
  • 5 Lessons On How to Build High Impact Teams: Jake Wood talks about what it takes to make a high impact team. What are some of the ingredients? First, you need to know your role and how you fit in with your team. You need to embrace innovation and change. And of course, one of my favourites, “Passion trumps talent, but culture is king”.
  • Why Your Software Development Process Is Broken: In this article by Joe Emison, discusses where control in software products lies and how shifting it between developers and high-level managers can have different effects. On one hand, developers with too much control start to stick in all the fancy new technology because developers love new shiny things, and on the other hand high-level managers create a one-way flow of direction down to developers. His solution is to have a benevolent dictator that lies somewhere in the middle.

Empower your team to innovate and watch your company’s innovation as a whole increase. Remember to follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week!

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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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