Tag: sample

IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

Background

A few months ago I wrote up an article on using PyTools, Visual Studio, and Python all together. I received some much appreciated positive feedback for it, but really for me it was about exploring. I had dabbled with Python a few years back and hadn’t really touched it much since. I spend the bulk of my programming time in Visual Studio, so it was a great opportunity to try and bridge that gap.

I had an individual contact me via the Dev Leader Facebook group that had come across my original article. However, he wanted a little bit more out of it. Since I had my initial exploring out of the way, I figured it was probably worth trying to come up with a semi-useful example. I could get two birds with one stone here–Help out at least one person, and get another blog post written up!

The request was really around taking the output from a Python script and being able to display it in a WinForm application. I took it one step further and created an application that either lets you choose a Python script from your file system or let you type in a basic script directly on the form. There isn’t any fancy editor tools on the form, but someone could easily take this application and extend it into a little Python editor if they wanted to.

Leveraging IronPython

In my original PyTools article, I mention how to get IronPython installed into your Visual Studio project. In Visual Studio 2012 (and likely a very similar approach for other versions of Visual Studio), the following steps should get you setup with IronPython in your project:

  • Open an existing project or start a new one.
  • Make sure your project is set to be at least .NET 4.0
    • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Properties”
    • Switch to the “Application” tab.
    • Under “Target framework”, select  “.NET Framework 4.0”.
  • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Manage NuGet Packages…”.
  • In the “Search Online” text field on the top right, search for “IronPython”.
  • Select “IronPython” from within the search results and press the “Install” button.
  • Follow the instructions, and you should be good to go!

Now that we have IronPython in a project, we’ll need to actually look at some code that gets us up and running with executing Python code from within C#. If you followed my original post, you’ll know that it’s pretty simple:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("your python code here");

And there you have it. If it seems easy, that’s because it is. But what about the part about getting the output from Python? What if I wanted to print something to the console in Python and see what it spits out? After all, that’s the goal I was setting out to accomplish with this article. If you try the following code, you’ll notice you see a whole lot of nothing:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("print('I wish I could see this in the console...')");

What gives? How are we supposed to see the output from IronPython? Well, it all has to do with setting the output Stream of the IronPython engine. It has a nice little method for letting you specify what stream to output to:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(yourStreamInstanceHere);

In this example, I wanted to output the stream directly into my own TextBox. To accomplish this, I wrote up my own little stream wrapper that takes in a TextBox and appends the stream contents directly to the Text property of the TextBox. Here’s what my stream implementation looks like:


private class ScriptOutputStream : Stream
{
  #region Fields
  private readonly TextBox _control;
  #endregion

  #region Constructors
  public ScriptOutputStream(TextBox control)
  {
    _control = control;
  }
  #endregion

  #region Properties
  public override bool CanRead
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanSeek
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanWrite
  {
    get { return true; }
  }

  public override long Length
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }

  public override long Position
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    set { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }
  #endregion

  #region Exposed Members
  public override void Flush()
  {
  }

  public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void SetLength(long value)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    _control.Text += Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(buffer, offset, count);
  }
  #endregion
}

Now while this isn’t pretty, it serves one purpose: Use the stream API to allow binary data to be appended to a TextBox. The magic is happening inside of the Write() method where I take the binary data that IronPython will be providing to us, convert it to a string via code page 1252 encoding, and then append that directly to the control’s Text property. In order to use this, we just need to set it up on our IronPython engine:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(new ScriptOutputStream(txtYourTextBoxInstance), Encoding.GetEncoding(1252));

Now, any time you output to the console in IronPython you’ll get your console output directly in your TextBox! The ScriptOutputStream implementation and calling SetOutput() are really the key points in getting output from IronPython.

The Application at a Glance

I wanted to take this example a little bit further than the initial request. I didn’t just want to show that I could take the IronPython output and put it in a form control, I wanted to demonstrate being able to pick the Python code to run too!

Firstly, you’re able to browse for Python scripts using the default radio button. Just type in the path to your script or use the browse button:

IronPython - Run script from file

Enter a path or browse for your script. Press “Run Script” to see the output of your script in the bottom TextBox.

Next, press “Run Script”, and you’re off! This simply uses a StreamReader to get the contents of the file and then once in the contents are stored in a string, they are passed into the IronPython engine’s Execute() method. As you might have guessed, my “helloworld.py” script just contains a single line that prints out “Hello, World!”. Nothing too fancy in there!

Let’s try running a script that we type into the input TextBox instead. There’s some basic error handling so if your script doesn’t execute, I’ll print out the exception and the stack trace to go along with it. In this case, I tried executing a Python script that was just “asd”. Clearly, this is invalid and shouldn’t run:

python_error_asd

Python interpreted the input we provided but, as expected, could not find a definition for “asd”.

That should be along the lines of what we expected–The script isn’t valid, and IronPython tells us why. What other errors can we see? Well, the IronPython engine will also let you know if you have bad syntax:

python_error_bad_syntax

Python interpreted the script, but found a syntax error in our silly input.

Finally, if we want to see some working Python we can do some console printing. Let’s try a little HelloWorld-esque script:

python_pass_hello_world

Python interpreted our simple Hello World script.

Summary

This sample was pretty short but that just demonstrates how easy it is! Passing in a script from C# into the IronPython is straight forward, but getting the output from IronPython is a bit trickier. If you’re not familiar with the different parts of the IronPython engine, it can be difficult to find the things you need to get this working. With a simple custom stream implementation we’re able to get the output from IronPython easily. All we had to do was create our own stream implementation and pass it into the SetOutput() method that’s available via the IronPython engine class. Now we can easily hook the output of our Python scripts!

As always, all of the source for you to try this out is available online:

Some next steps might include:

  • Creating your own Python IDE. Figure out some nice text-editing features and you can run Python scripts right from your application.
  • Creating a test script dashboard. Do you write test scripts for other applications in Python? Why not have a dashboard that can report on the results of these scripts?
  • Add in some game scripting! Sure, you could have done this with IronPython alone, but maybe now you can skip the WinForms part of this and just make your own stream wrapper for getting script output. Cook up some simple scripts in a scripting engine and voila! You can easily pass information into Python and get the results back out.

Let me know in the comments if you come up with some other cool ideas for how you can leverage this!


Dynamic Programming with Python and C#

Dynamic Coding with C# and Python

Dynamic Code: Background

Previously, I was expressing how excited I was when I discovered Python, C#, and Visual Studio integration. I wanted to save a couple examples regarding dynamic code for a follow up article… and here it is! (And yes… there is code you can copy and paste or download).

What does it mean to be dynamic? As with most things, wikipedia provides a great start. Essentially, much of the work done for type checking and signatures is performed at runtime for a dynamic language. This could mean that you can write code that calls a non-existent method and you wont get any compilation errors. However, once execution hits that line of code, you might get an exception thrown. This Stack Overflow post’s top answer does a great job of explaining it as well, so I’d recommend checking that out if you need a bit more clarification. So we have statically bound and dynamic languages. Great stuff!

So does that mean Python is dynamic? What about C#?

Well Python is certainly dynamic. The code is interpreted and functions and types are verified at run time. You won’t know about type exceptions or missing method exceptions until you go to execute the code. For what it’s worth, this isn’t to be confused with a loosely typed language. Ol’ faithful Stack Overflow has another great answer about this. The type of the variable is determined at runtime, but the variable type doesn’t magically change. If you set a variable to be an integer, it will be an integer. If you set it immediately after to be a string, it will be a string. (Dynamic, but strongly typed!)

As for C#, in C# 4 the dynamic keyword was introduced. By using the dynamic keyword, you can essentially get similar behaviour to Python. If you declare a variable of type dynamic, it will take on the type of whatever you assign to it. If I assign a string value to my dynamic variable, it will be a string. I can’t perform operations like pre/post increment (++) on the variable when it’s been assigned a string value without getting an exception. If I assign an integer value immediately after having assigned a string value, my variable will take on the integer type and my numeric operators become available.

Where does this get us with C# and Python working together then?

Example 1: A Simple Class

After trying to get some functions to execute between C# and Python, I thought I needed to take it to the next level. I know I can declare classes in Python, but how does that look when I want to access it from C#? Am I limited to only calling functions from Python with no concept of classes?

The answer to the last question is no. Most definitely not. You can do some pretty awesome things with IronPython. In this example, I wanted to show how I can instantiate an instance of a class defined within a Python script from C#. This script doesn’t have to be created in code (you can use an external file), so if you need more clarification on this check out my last Python/C# posting, but I chose to do it this way to have all the code in one spot. I figured it might be easier to show for an example.

We’ll be defining a class in Python called “MyClass” (I know, I’m not very creative, am I?). It’s going to have a single method on it called “go” that will take one input parameter and print it to the console. It’s also going to return the input string so that we can consume it in C# and use it to validate that things are actually going as planned. Here’s the code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Scripting.Hosting;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace DynamicScript
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter the text you would like the script to print!");
            var input = Console.ReadLine();

            var script =
                "class MyClass:\r\n" +
                "    def __init__(self):\r\n" +
                "        pass\r\n" +
                "    def go(self, input):\r\n" +
                "        print('From dynamic python: ' + input)\r\n" +
                "        return input";

            try
            {
                var engine = Python.CreateEngine();
                var scope = engine.CreateScope();
                var ops = engine.Operations;

                engine.Execute(script, scope);
                var pythonType = scope.GetVariable("MyClass");
                dynamic instance = ops.CreateInstance(pythonType);
                var value = instance.go(input);

                if (!input.Equals(value))
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("Odd... The return value wasn't the same as what we input!");
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! There was an exception while running the script: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Not too bad, right? The first block of code just takes some user input. It’s what we’re going to have our Python script output to the console. The next chunk of code is our Python script declaration. As I said, this script can be loaded from an external file and doesn’t necessarily have to exist entirely within our C# code files.

Within our try block, we’re going to setup our Python engine and “execute” our script. From there, we can ask Python for the type definition of “MyClass” and then ask the engine to create a new instance of it. Here’s where the magic happens though! How can we declare our variable type in C# if Python actually has the variable declaration? Well, we don’t have to worry about it! If we make it the dynamic type, then our variable will take on whatever type is assigned to it. In this case, it will be of type “MyClass”.

Afterwards, I use the return value from calling “go” so that we can verify the variable we passed in is the same as what we got back out… and it definitely is! Our C# string was passed into a Python function on a custom Python class and spat back out to C# just as it went in. How cool is that?

Some food for thought:

  • What happens if we change the C# code to call “go1” instead of “go”? Do we expect it to work? If it’s not supposed to work, will it fail at compile time or runtime?
  • Notice how our Python method “go” doesn’t have any type parameters specified for the argument “input”? How and why does all of this work then?!

Example 2: Dynamically Adding Properties

I was pretty excited after getting the first example working. This meant I’d be able to create my own types in Python and then leverage them directly in C#. Pretty fancy stuff. I didn’t want to stop there though. The dynamic keyword is still new to me, and so is integrating Python and C#. What more could I do?

Well, I remembered something from my earlier Python days about dynamically modifying types at run-time. To give you an example, in C# if I declare a class with method X and property Y, instances of this class are always going to have method X and property Y. In Python, I have the ability to dynamically add a property to my class. This means that if I create a Python class that has method X but is missing property Y, at runtime I can go right ahead and add property Y. That’s some pretty powerful stuff right there. Now I don’t know of any situations off the top of my head where this would be really beneficial, but the fact that it’s doable had me really interested.

So if Python lets me modify methods and properties available to instances of my type at runtime, how does C# handle this? Does the dynamic keyword support this kind of stuff?

You bet. Here’s the code for my sample application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

using Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace DynamicClass
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to read the value of 'MyProperty' from a Python object before we actually add the dynamic property.");
            Console.ReadLine();

            // this script was taken from this blog post:
            // http://znasibov.info/blog/html/2010/03/10/python-classes-dynamic-properties.html
            var script =
                "class Properties(object):\r\n" +
                "    def add_property(self, name, value):\r\n" +
                "        # create local fget and fset functions\r\n" +
                "        fget = lambda self: self._get_property(name)\r\n" +
                "        fset = lambda self, value: self._set_property(name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "        # add property to self\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self.__class__, name, property(fget, fset))\r\n" +
                "        # add corresponding local variable\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self, '_' + name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "    def _set_property(self, name, value):\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self, '_' + name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "    def _get_property(self, name):\r\n" +
                "        return getattr(self, '_' + name)\r\n";

            try
            {
                var engine = Python.CreateEngine();
                var scope = engine.CreateScope();
                var ops = engine.Operations;

                engine.Execute(script, scope);
                var pythonType = scope.GetVariable("Properties");
                dynamic instance = ops.CreateInstance(pythonType);

                try
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(instance.MyProperty);
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("This class doesn't have the property we want, so this should be impossible!");
                }
                catch (RuntimeBinderException)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("We got the exception as expected!");
                }

                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("Press enter to add the property 'MyProperty' to our Python object and then try to read the value.");
                Console.ReadLine();

                instance.add_property("MyProperty", "Expected value of MyProperty!");
                Console.WriteLine(instance.MyProperty);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! There was an exception while running the script: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Let’s start by comparing this to the first example, because some parts of the code are similar. We start off my telling  the user what’s going to happen and wait for them to press enter. Nothing special here. Next, we declare our Python script (again, you can have this as an external file) which I pulled form this blog. It was one of the first hits when searching for dynamically adding properties to classes in Python, and despite having limited Python knowledge, it worked exactly as I had hoped. So thank you, Zaur Nasibov.

Inside our try block, we have the Python engine creation just like our first example. We execute our script right after too and create an instance of our type defined in Python. Again, this is all just like the first example so far. At this point, we have a reference in C# to a type declared in Python called “Properties”. I then try to print to the console the value stored inside my instances property called “MyProperty”. If you were paying attention to what’s written in the code, you’ll notice we don’t have a property called “MyProperty”! Doh! Obviously that’s going to throw an exception, so I show that in the code as well.

So where does that leave us then? Well, let’s add the property “MyProperty” ourselves! Once we add it, we should be able to ask our C# instance for the value of “MyProperty”. And… voila!

Some food for thought:

  • When we added our property in Python, we never specified a type. What would happen if we tried to increment “MyProperty” after we added it? What would happen if we tried to assign an integer value of 4 to “MyProperty”?
  • When might it be useful to have types in C# dynamically get new methods or properties?

Summary

With this post, we’re still just scratching the surface of what’s doable when integrating Python and C#. Historically, these languages have been viewed as very different where C# is statically bound and Python is a dynamic language. However, it’s pretty clear with a bit of IronPython magic that we can quite easily marry the two languages together. Using the “dynamic” keyword within C# really lets us get away with a lot!

Source code for these projects is available at the following locations:


Simple Way To Structure Threads For Control

Background

I’ve previously discussed the differences between the BackgroundWorker and Thread classes, but I figured it would be useful to touch on some code. I’d like to share the pattern I commonly use when creating threads in C# and discuss some of the highlights.

The Single Thread

I like to use this design when I have a single thread I need to run and in the context of my object responsible for running the thread, I do mean having a single thread. Of course, you could have your object in control of multiple threads as long as you repeat this design pattern for each of them.

Here’s the interface that I’ll be using for all of the examples:

    internal interface IThreadRunner
    {
        #region Exposed Members

        void Start();

        void Stop();

        #endregion 
    }

Behold!

    internal class SingleThreadRunner : IThreadRunner
    {
        #region Fields

        private readonly object _threadLock;
        private readonly AutoResetEvent _trigger;
        private Thread _theOneThread;

        #endregion

        #region Constructors

        /// 
        /// Prevents a default instance of the class from being created.
        /// 
        private SingleThreadRunner()
        {
            _threadLock = new object();
            _trigger = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        }

        #endregion

        #region Exposed Members

        public static IThreadRunner Create()
        {
            return new SingleThreadRunner();
        }

        public void Start()
        {
            lock (_threadLock)
            {
                // check if already running
                if (_theOneThread != null)
                {
                    return;
                }

                _theOneThread = new Thread(DoWork);
                _theOneThread.Name = "The One Thread";
                _theOneThread.Start(_trigger);
            }
        }

        public void Stop()
        {
            lock (_threadLock)
            {
                // check if not running
                if (_theOneThread == null)
                {
                    return;
                }

                _theOneThread = null;
                _trigger.Set();
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Internal Members

        private void DoWork(object parameter)
        {
            var currentThread = Thread.CurrentThread;

            // this was the trigger that we passed in. elesewhere in the 
            // instance, we can use this object to wake up the thread.
            var trigger = (AutoResetEvent)parameter;

            try
            {
                // keep running while we're expected to be running
                while (currentThread == _theOneThread)
                {
                    // DO ALL SORTS OF AWESOME WORK HERE.
                    Console.WriteLine("Awesome work being done.");

                    // put this thread to sleep, but remember it can be woken 
                    // up from other places in this instance.
                    trigger.WaitOne(1000);
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                lock (_threadLock)
                {
                    // if we were still expected to be running, change the 
                    // state to suggest that we're not
                    if (_theOneThread == currentThread)
                    {
                        _theOneThread = null;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }

This design was taken from some Java programming I had done in a previous life. Essentially, I have a thread that is responsible for doing some work in a loop. It could be anything… Periodically polling for some data, a work dequeing thread, a random-cursor-moving thread… Anything! The point is, you only want one of these suckers hanging around. How is this accomplished?

Leveraging the instance variable that marks the one expected running thread is key here. Whenever this thread checks if it should still be running, if the current thread doesn’t match what’s assigned to the instance variable then it needs to stop! This means you could potentially spawn off two of these threads, and if you set the instance variable to one of the two, then the other one should kill itself off! Pretty neat.

By using the reset event, we can actually interrupt this thread if it’s sleeping. This is great if we have a thread that periodically wakes up to do some work but we want to stop it and have it stop fast. We simple set our instance variable for the thread to be null and then set this thread’s reset event to ensure it get’s woken up. Presto! It wakes up, checks the condition, and realizes it needs to exit the loop.

Simple.

The Handful of Threads

This design is almost identical to the single thread design above. I use it primarily when I want to have an object responsible for a bunch of threads that are turned on/off under the same conditions. The major difference between the two designs? In the single thread scenario, we check that our current thread is still set to be the one instance. In this design, we need all of our threads to be checking against the same state object which is not going to be a single thread instance.

Let’s have a peek:

    internal class GroupThreadRunner : IThreadRunner
    {
        #region Fields

        private readonly object _threadLock;
        private readonly Dictionary<Thread, AutoResetEvent> _triggers;

        private bool _running;

        #endregion

        #region Constructors

        /// 
        /// Prevents a default instance of the class from being created.
        /// 
        private GroupThreadRunner()
        {
            _threadLock = new object();
            _triggers = new Dictionary<Thread, AutoResetEvent>();
        }

        #endregion

        #region Exposed Members

        public static IThreadRunner Create()
        {
            return new GroupThreadRunner();
        }

        public void Start()
        {
            lock (_threadLock)
            {
                // check if any are already running
                if (_triggers.Count > 0)
                {
                    return;
                }

                _running = true;

                const int NUMBER_OF_THREADS = 4;
                for (int i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_THREADS; ++i)
                {
                    var thread = new Thread(DoWork);
                    thread.Name = "Thread " + i;

                    var trigger = new AutoResetEvent(false);
                    _triggers[thread] = trigger;

                    thread.Start(trigger);
                }
            }
        }

        public void Stop()
        {
            lock (_threadLock)
            {
                // check if not running
                if (_triggers.Count <= 0)
                {
                    return;
                }

                _running = false;
                foreach (var trigger in _triggers.Values)
                {
                    trigger.Set();
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Internal Members

        private void DoWork(object parameter)
        {
            var currentThread = Thread.CurrentThread;

            // this was the trigger that we passed in. elesewhere in the 
            // instance, we can use this object to wake up the thread.
            var trigger = (AutoResetEvent)parameter;

            try
            {
                // keep running while we're expected to be running
                while (_running)
                {
                    // DO ALL SORTS OF AWESOME WORK HERE.
                    Console.WriteLine("Awesome work being done by " + currentThread.Name);

                    // put this thread to sleep, but remember it can be woken 
                    // up from other places in this instance.
                    trigger.WaitOne(1000);
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                lock (_threadLock)
                {
                    _triggers.Remove(currentThread);

                    // if we were still expected to be running, change the 
                    // state to suggest that we're not
                    if (_running && _triggers.Count <= 0)
                    {
                        _running = false;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }

Summary

The above patterns I discussed cover my common usage for threads: Instances that have reoccurring work over long periods of time. Both patterns are very similar and only have slight modifications to make them support one instance or many thread instances running. If you have one unique thread or many threads… there’s a pattern for you!

Check out a full working example of this code over here.


  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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