Tag: Scripting

IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

IronPython: A Quick WinForms Introduction

Background

A few months ago I wrote up an article on using PyTools, Visual Studio, and Python all together. I received some much appreciated positive feedback for it, but really for me it was about exploring. I had dabbled with Python a few years back and hadn’t really touched it much since. I spend the bulk of my programming time in Visual Studio, so it was a great opportunity to try and bridge that gap.

I had an individual contact me via the Dev Leader Facebook group that had come across my original article. However, he wanted a little bit more out of it. Since I had my initial exploring out of the way, I figured it was probably worth trying to come up with a semi-useful example. I could get two birds with one stone here–Help out at least one person, and get another blog post written up!

The request was really around taking the output from a Python script and being able to display it in a WinForm application. I took it one step further and created an application that either lets you choose a Python script from your file system or let you type in a basic script directly on the form. There isn’t any fancy editor tools on the form, but someone could easily take this application and extend it into a little Python editor if they wanted to.

Leveraging IronPython

In my original PyTools article, I mention how to get IronPython installed into your Visual Studio project. In Visual Studio 2012 (and likely a very similar approach for other versions of Visual Studio), the following steps should get you setup with IronPython in your project:

  • Open an existing project or start a new one.
  • Make sure your project is set to be at least .NET 4.0
    • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Properties”
    • Switch to the “Application” tab.
    • Under “Target framework”, select  “.NET Framework 4.0”.
  • Right click on the project within your solution explorer and select “Manage NuGet Packages…”.
  • In the “Search Online” text field on the top right, search for “IronPython”.
  • Select “IronPython” from within the search results and press the “Install” button.
  • Follow the instructions, and you should be good to go!

Now that we have IronPython in a project, we’ll need to actually look at some code that gets us up and running with executing Python code from within C#. If you followed my original post, you’ll know that it’s pretty simple:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("your python code here");

And there you have it. If it seems easy, that’s because it is. But what about the part about getting the output from Python? What if I wanted to print something to the console in Python and see what it spits out? After all, that’s the goal I was setting out to accomplish with this article. If you try the following code, you’ll notice you see a whole lot of nothing:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Execute("print('I wish I could see this in the console...')");

What gives? How are we supposed to see the output from IronPython? Well, it all has to do with setting the output Stream of the IronPython engine. It has a nice little method for letting you specify what stream to output to:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(yourStreamInstanceHere);

In this example, I wanted to output the stream directly into my own TextBox. To accomplish this, I wrote up my own little stream wrapper that takes in a TextBox and appends the stream contents directly to the Text property of the TextBox. Here’s what my stream implementation looks like:


private class ScriptOutputStream : Stream
{
  #region Fields
  private readonly TextBox _control;
  #endregion

  #region Constructors
  public ScriptOutputStream(TextBox control)
  {
    _control = control;
  }
  #endregion

  #region Properties
  public override bool CanRead
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanSeek
  {
    get { return false; }
  }

  public override bool CanWrite
  {
    get { return true; }
  }

  public override long Length
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }

  public override long Position
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    set { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
  }
  #endregion

  #region Exposed Members
  public override void Flush()
  {
  }

  public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void SetLength(long value)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
  {
    _control.Text += Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(buffer, offset, count);
  }
  #endregion
}

Now while this isn’t pretty, it serves one purpose: Use the stream API to allow binary data to be appended to a TextBox. The magic is happening inside of the Write() method where I take the binary data that IronPython will be providing to us, convert it to a string via code page 1252 encoding, and then append that directly to the control’s Text property. In order to use this, we just need to set it up on our IronPython engine:


var py = Python.CreateEngine();
py.Runtime.IO.SetOutput(new ScriptOutputStream(txtYourTextBoxInstance), Encoding.GetEncoding(1252));

Now, any time you output to the console in IronPython you’ll get your console output directly in your TextBox! The ScriptOutputStream implementation and calling SetOutput() are really the key points in getting output from IronPython.

The Application at a Glance

I wanted to take this example a little bit further than the initial request. I didn’t just want to show that I could take the IronPython output and put it in a form control, I wanted to demonstrate being able to pick the Python code to run too!

Firstly, you’re able to browse for Python scripts using the default radio button. Just type in the path to your script or use the browse button:

IronPython - Run script from file

Enter a path or browse for your script. Press “Run Script” to see the output of your script in the bottom TextBox.

Next, press “Run Script”, and you’re off! This simply uses a StreamReader to get the contents of the file and then once in the contents are stored in a string, they are passed into the IronPython engine’s Execute() method. As you might have guessed, my “helloworld.py” script just contains a single line that prints out “Hello, World!”. Nothing too fancy in there!

Let’s try running a script that we type into the input TextBox instead. There’s some basic error handling so if your script doesn’t execute, I’ll print out the exception and the stack trace to go along with it. In this case, I tried executing a Python script that was just “asd”. Clearly, this is invalid and shouldn’t run:

python_error_asd

Python interpreted the input we provided but, as expected, could not find a definition for “asd”.

That should be along the lines of what we expected–The script isn’t valid, and IronPython tells us why. What other errors can we see? Well, the IronPython engine will also let you know if you have bad syntax:

python_error_bad_syntax

Python interpreted the script, but found a syntax error in our silly input.

Finally, if we want to see some working Python we can do some console printing. Let’s try a little HelloWorld-esque script:

python_pass_hello_world

Python interpreted our simple Hello World script.

Summary

This sample was pretty short but that just demonstrates how easy it is! Passing in a script from C# into the IronPython is straight forward, but getting the output from IronPython is a bit trickier. If you’re not familiar with the different parts of the IronPython engine, it can be difficult to find the things you need to get this working. With a simple custom stream implementation we’re able to get the output from IronPython easily. All we had to do was create our own stream implementation and pass it into the SetOutput() method that’s available via the IronPython engine class. Now we can easily hook the output of our Python scripts!

As always, all of the source for you to try this out is available online:

Some next steps might include:

  • Creating your own Python IDE. Figure out some nice text-editing features and you can run Python scripts right from your application.
  • Creating a test script dashboard. Do you write test scripts for other applications in Python? Why not have a dashboard that can report on the results of these scripts?
  • Add in some game scripting! Sure, you could have done this with IronPython alone, but maybe now you can skip the WinForms part of this and just make your own stream wrapper for getting script output. Cook up some simple scripts in a scripting engine and voila! You can easily pass information into Python and get the results back out.

Let me know in the comments if you come up with some other cool ideas for how you can leverage this!


Dynamic Programming with Python and C#

Dynamic Coding with C# and Python

Dynamic Code: Background

Previously, I was expressing how excited I was when I discovered Python, C#, and Visual Studio integration. I wanted to save a couple examples regarding dynamic code for a follow up article… and here it is! (And yes… there is code you can copy and paste or download).

What does it mean to be dynamic? As with most things, wikipedia provides a great start. Essentially, much of the work done for type checking and signatures is performed at runtime for a dynamic language. This could mean that you can write code that calls a non-existent method and you wont get any compilation errors. However, once execution hits that line of code, you might get an exception thrown. This Stack Overflow post’s top answer does a great job of explaining it as well, so I’d recommend checking that out if you need a bit more clarification. So we have statically bound and dynamic languages. Great stuff!

So does that mean Python is dynamic? What about C#?

Well Python is certainly dynamic. The code is interpreted and functions and types are verified at run time. You won’t know about type exceptions or missing method exceptions until you go to execute the code. For what it’s worth, this isn’t to be confused with a loosely typed language. Ol’ faithful Stack Overflow has another great answer about this. The type of the variable is determined at runtime, but the variable type doesn’t magically change. If you set a variable to be an integer, it will be an integer. If you set it immediately after to be a string, it will be a string. (Dynamic, but strongly typed!)

As for C#, in C# 4 the dynamic keyword was introduced. By using the dynamic keyword, you can essentially get similar behaviour to Python. If you declare a variable of type dynamic, it will take on the type of whatever you assign to it. If I assign a string value to my dynamic variable, it will be a string. I can’t perform operations like pre/post increment (++) on the variable when it’s been assigned a string value without getting an exception. If I assign an integer value immediately after having assigned a string value, my variable will take on the integer type and my numeric operators become available.

Where does this get us with C# and Python working together then?

Example 1: A Simple Class

After trying to get some functions to execute between C# and Python, I thought I needed to take it to the next level. I know I can declare classes in Python, but how does that look when I want to access it from C#? Am I limited to only calling functions from Python with no concept of classes?

The answer to the last question is no. Most definitely not. You can do some pretty awesome things with IronPython. In this example, I wanted to show how I can instantiate an instance of a class defined within a Python script from C#. This script doesn’t have to be created in code (you can use an external file), so if you need more clarification on this check out my last Python/C# posting, but I chose to do it this way to have all the code in one spot. I figured it might be easier to show for an example.

We’ll be defining a class in Python called “MyClass” (I know, I’m not very creative, am I?). It’s going to have a single method on it called “go” that will take one input parameter and print it to the console. It’s also going to return the input string so that we can consume it in C# and use it to validate that things are actually going as planned. Here’s the code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Scripting.Hosting;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace DynamicScript
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter the text you would like the script to print!");
            var input = Console.ReadLine();

            var script =
                "class MyClass:\r\n" +
                "    def __init__(self):\r\n" +
                "        pass\r\n" +
                "    def go(self, input):\r\n" +
                "        print('From dynamic python: ' + input)\r\n" +
                "        return input";

            try
            {
                var engine = Python.CreateEngine();
                var scope = engine.CreateScope();
                var ops = engine.Operations;

                engine.Execute(script, scope);
                var pythonType = scope.GetVariable("MyClass");
                dynamic instance = ops.CreateInstance(pythonType);
                var value = instance.go(input);

                if (!input.Equals(value))
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("Odd... The return value wasn't the same as what we input!");
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! There was an exception while running the script: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Not too bad, right? The first block of code just takes some user input. It’s what we’re going to have our Python script output to the console. The next chunk of code is our Python script declaration. As I said, this script can be loaded from an external file and doesn’t necessarily have to exist entirely within our C# code files.

Within our try block, we’re going to setup our Python engine and “execute” our script. From there, we can ask Python for the type definition of “MyClass” and then ask the engine to create a new instance of it. Here’s where the magic happens though! How can we declare our variable type in C# if Python actually has the variable declaration? Well, we don’t have to worry about it! If we make it the dynamic type, then our variable will take on whatever type is assigned to it. In this case, it will be of type “MyClass”.

Afterwards, I use the return value from calling “go” so that we can verify the variable we passed in is the same as what we got back out… and it definitely is! Our C# string was passed into a Python function on a custom Python class and spat back out to C# just as it went in. How cool is that?

Some food for thought:

  • What happens if we change the C# code to call “go1” instead of “go”? Do we expect it to work? If it’s not supposed to work, will it fail at compile time or runtime?
  • Notice how our Python method “go” doesn’t have any type parameters specified for the argument “input”? How and why does all of this work then?!

Example 2: Dynamically Adding Properties

I was pretty excited after getting the first example working. This meant I’d be able to create my own types in Python and then leverage them directly in C#. Pretty fancy stuff. I didn’t want to stop there though. The dynamic keyword is still new to me, and so is integrating Python and C#. What more could I do?

Well, I remembered something from my earlier Python days about dynamically modifying types at run-time. To give you an example, in C# if I declare a class with method X and property Y, instances of this class are always going to have method X and property Y. In Python, I have the ability to dynamically add a property to my class. This means that if I create a Python class that has method X but is missing property Y, at runtime I can go right ahead and add property Y. That’s some pretty powerful stuff right there. Now I don’t know of any situations off the top of my head where this would be really beneficial, but the fact that it’s doable had me really interested.

So if Python lets me modify methods and properties available to instances of my type at runtime, how does C# handle this? Does the dynamic keyword support this kind of stuff?

You bet. Here’s the code for my sample application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

using Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace DynamicClass
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to read the value of 'MyProperty' from a Python object before we actually add the dynamic property.");
            Console.ReadLine();

            // this script was taken from this blog post:
            // http://znasibov.info/blog/html/2010/03/10/python-classes-dynamic-properties.html
            var script =
                "class Properties(object):\r\n" +
                "    def add_property(self, name, value):\r\n" +
                "        # create local fget and fset functions\r\n" +
                "        fget = lambda self: self._get_property(name)\r\n" +
                "        fset = lambda self, value: self._set_property(name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "        # add property to self\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self.__class__, name, property(fget, fset))\r\n" +
                "        # add corresponding local variable\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self, '_' + name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "    def _set_property(self, name, value):\r\n" +
                "        setattr(self, '_' + name, value)\r\n" +
                "\r\n" +
                "    def _get_property(self, name):\r\n" +
                "        return getattr(self, '_' + name)\r\n";

            try
            {
                var engine = Python.CreateEngine();
                var scope = engine.CreateScope();
                var ops = engine.Operations;

                engine.Execute(script, scope);
                var pythonType = scope.GetVariable("Properties");
                dynamic instance = ops.CreateInstance(pythonType);

                try
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(instance.MyProperty);
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("This class doesn't have the property we want, so this should be impossible!");
                }
                catch (RuntimeBinderException)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("We got the exception as expected!");
                }

                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("Press enter to add the property 'MyProperty' to our Python object and then try to read the value.");
                Console.ReadLine();

                instance.add_property("MyProperty", "Expected value of MyProperty!");
                Console.WriteLine(instance.MyProperty);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! There was an exception while running the script: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Let’s start by comparing this to the first example, because some parts of the code are similar. We start off my telling  the user what’s going to happen and wait for them to press enter. Nothing special here. Next, we declare our Python script (again, you can have this as an external file) which I pulled form this blog. It was one of the first hits when searching for dynamically adding properties to classes in Python, and despite having limited Python knowledge, it worked exactly as I had hoped. So thank you, Zaur Nasibov.

Inside our try block, we have the Python engine creation just like our first example. We execute our script right after too and create an instance of our type defined in Python. Again, this is all just like the first example so far. At this point, we have a reference in C# to a type declared in Python called “Properties”. I then try to print to the console the value stored inside my instances property called “MyProperty”. If you were paying attention to what’s written in the code, you’ll notice we don’t have a property called “MyProperty”! Doh! Obviously that’s going to throw an exception, so I show that in the code as well.

So where does that leave us then? Well, let’s add the property “MyProperty” ourselves! Once we add it, we should be able to ask our C# instance for the value of “MyProperty”. And… voila!

Some food for thought:

  • When we added our property in Python, we never specified a type. What would happen if we tried to increment “MyProperty” after we added it? What would happen if we tried to assign an integer value of 4 to “MyProperty”?
  • When might it be useful to have types in C# dynamically get new methods or properties?

Summary

With this post, we’re still just scratching the surface of what’s doable when integrating Python and C#. Historically, these languages have been viewed as very different where C# is statically bound and Python is a dynamic language. However, it’s pretty clear with a bit of IronPython magic that we can quite easily marry the two languages together. Using the “dynamic” keyword within C# really lets us get away with a lot!

Source code for these projects is available at the following locations:


Python, Visual Studio, and C#… So. Sweet.

Python, Visual Studio, and C#

Python & C# – Background

Let’s clear the air. Using Python and C# together isn’t anything new. If you’ve used one of these languages and at least heard of the other, then you’ve probably heard of IronPython. IronPython lets you use both C# and Python together. Pretty legit. If you haven’t tried it out yet, hopefully your brain is starting to whir and fizzle thinking about the possibilities.

My development experiences is primarily in C# and before that it was VB .NET (So I’m pretty attached to the whole .NET framework… We’re basically best friends at this point). However, pretty early in my career (my first co-op at Engenuity Corporation, really) I was introduced to Python. I had never really used a dynamic or implicitly typed language, so it was quite an adventure and learning experience.

Unfortunately, aside from my time at EngCorp, I hadn’t really had a use to continue on with Python development. Lately, I’ve had a spark of curiosity. I’m comfortable with C#, sure, but is that enough? There’s lots of great programming languages out there! It’s hard for me to break out of my comfort zone though. I’m used to C# and the awesomeness of Visual Studio, so how could I ever break free from these two things?

Well… I don’t have to yet.

Python Tools for Visual Studio

This was a nice little treasure to stumble upon:

But I didn’t really know what it was all about. I had heard of IronPython, and I knew I could use Python with C# together, so what exactly is “Python Tools“?

After I watched the video that the Visual Studio team tweeted out, I was captivated. Did this mean I could revisit python without having to leave the comfort of my favourite IDE? You bet. First thing I did after watching this video (and yes, I somehow managed to hold back the excitement and wait until the video was done) was fire up Visual Studio. I run with Visual Studio 2012 (the dark theme too) so in my screenshots that’s what you’ll be seeing. Once Visual Studio has loaded:

  • Go to the “Tools” menu at the top of the IDE.
  • Select the “Extensions and Updates…” menu item.
  • You should see the “Extensions and Updates” dialog window now.

You’re going to want to search for “Python Tools” after you’ve selected the “Online” option on the left side of the dialog. It should look something like this:

Python Tools - Visual Studio Extensions and Updates

Installing Python Tools for Visual Studio is pretty easy. Make sure you’re searching online and search for “Python Tools”.

After you’ve followed all of the installation instructions, it’s time to make sure the installation worked. Simple enough!

  • Go to the “File” menu at the top of the IDE.
  • Go to the “New” menu item.
  • Select the “Project…” menu item.
  • You should now see the “New Project” dialog

To ensure Python is now available, try seeing if you have Python project templates available:

Verify Python in Visual Studio

To verify that Python is now available in Visual Studio, check under the installed templates. It should be under “Other Languages”.

Hopefully it’s there. If not, or if you have any other install questions, I highly recommend you refer to the official site and follow along there. This is what got me up and running with my current machine, but if your setup is slightly different you should definitely follow their instructions. That’s it! You have Python Tools! But what else would make your C#, Python, and Visual Studio experience EVEN BETTER? The answer to that question is of course IronPython. Head on over to this page and get yourself setup with the latest cut of IronPython. Once that’s setup, you should have all the fancy tools you need!

Print to Console – Your First C#/Python Application

I’m sure you feel the excitement building. I’ll start by saying the code is all available online, so even though I’ll have snippets and pictures here, you can download all of the source and follow along that way if you want. Otherwise, I’ll do my best to walk you through how I set things up! This application is going to be pretty simple. It’s a tiny bit bigger than a “Hello World” application, with the difference being that you tell Python what you want to print to the console. Easy-peasy, right?

First up, let’s make a new C# console project.

  • From Visual Studio, go to the “File” menu at the top of the IDE.
  • Select the “New” menu item.
  • Select the “Project” menu item.
  • You should see the “New Project” dialog.
  • Select the “Visual C#” template on the left of the dialog.
  • Select “Console Application”.
  • In the framework dropdown at the top of the dialog, select .NET 4.5
  • Fill in the details for where you want to save your project.
  • Press “OK”! And we’re off!

Now that you have a console application you’re going to want to add in all the dependencies we need. If you look at the project in your solution explorer, you’re going to want to add the following dependencies:

IronPython Dependencies in Visual Studio

Add the IronPython and Microsoft.Scripting dependencies through the solution explorer in Visual Studio.

If you’re having trouble getting the dependencies set up, remember you can always download the source projects I’ve put together. Now that you have all the necessary dependencies, here’s the source for our little application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace PrintToConsole
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("What would you like to print from python?");
            var input = Console.ReadLine();

            var py = Python.CreateEngine();
            try
            {
                py.Execute("print('From Python: " + input + "')");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! We couldn't print your message because of an exception: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Let’s walk through what this code is doing:

  • First we’re getting input from the user. This is some pretty basic C# stuff, but we’re simply printing a message to the console and taking in the text the user enters before they press enter.
  • Next, we create a Python engine instance. This is the class that’s going to be responsible for executing python for us!
  • The code that exists within the try block tells our engine instance to execute some python code.
    • The print() method that you see being passed to the engine is the syntax since Python 3.0.
    • The parameter that we’re passing into the print() method is a python string… but we’re sticking our user input inside of it as well!
    • It’s also important to note that we’re building up a C# string that contains all of the Python code that will be executed and passing that to the engine.
  • I have a catch block here to catch any unexpected problems. Can you think of any?
    • What happens if your user input some text with a single quote?
  • The last part of the application just asks the user to press enter when they are all done.

Simple! There’s your first C# + Python application! You can see the source for the whole thing over here.

Run External Script

So this is great: you can now run some python code from within C#. Totally awesome. But what about all those python scripts you have written up already? Do you need to start copying and pasting them into C# code files and start to try and format them nicely? The answer is no, thankfully! Let’s start by following the exact same steps as outlined in the first example. You should be able to set up a new .NET 4.5 C# console project and add in all the same dependencies. Once you have that put together, you can use the following source code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

using IronPython.Hosting;

namespace RunExternalScript
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to execute the python script!");
            Console.ReadLine();

            var py = Python.CreateEngine();
            try
            {
                py.ExecuteFile("script.py");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Oops! We couldn't execute the script because of an exception: " + ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

This script looks similar, right? Before I explain what it does, let’s add in the Python script that you’ll be executing from this console application.

  • Right click on your project in the solution explorer.
  • Select the “Add” menu item from the context menu.
  • Select the “New Item…” menu item.
  • You should see the “Add New Item” dialog.
  • You’ll want to add a new text file called “script.py”.

It should look a little something like this:

Add new Python script in Visual Studio

In the “Add New Item” dialog, select “Text File” and rename it to “script.py”.

The next really important step is to ensure that this script gets copied to the output directory. To do this, select your newly added script file in the solution explorer and change the “Copy to Output Directory” setting to “Copy Always”. Now when you build your project, you should see your script.py file get copied to the build directory. Woo! You can put any python code you want inside of the script file, but I started with something simple:

print('Look at this python code go!')

Okay, so back to the C# code now. This example looks much like the first example.

  • Wait for the user to press enter before executing the Python script. Just to make sure they’re ready!
  • Create our engine instance, just like in the first example.
  • In the try block, we tell the engine to execute our script file. Because we had the file copy to the output directory, we can just use a relative path to the file here.
  • Again, we’ve wrapped the whole thing inside of a try/catch to ensure any mistakes you have in your python script get caught.
    • Try putting some erroneous Python code in the script file and running. What happens?
  • Finally, make sure the user is content with the output and wait for them to press Enter before exiting.

Look how easy that was! Now you can choose to execute Python code generated in C# OR execute external Python scripts!

Summary

It’s awesome to see that you expressed an interest in trying to marry these two languages together inside of a powerful IDE. We’re only breaking through the surface here, and admittedly I’m still quite new to integrating Python and C# together. I need to re-familiarize myself with Python, but I can already see there is a ton of potential for writing some really cool applications this way.

In the near future, I’ll be discussing how the dynamic keyword in C# can actually allow you to create classes in Python and use them right inside of C#… Dynamically!

Both of these pages were helpful in getting me up and running with C# and Python together:

Source code for these projects is available at the following locations:


  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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