Tag: Summary

Movember Prep – Weekly Article Dump

MoMagnets - Magnet Forensics' Movember Team

Movember Preparation

You might think we’re a bit early on this one, but at Magnet Forensics we’re going to take Movember to a whole new level this year. If you’re not familiar with Movember, you may want to head over here and get a rundown of the history of it. Movember started in Australia between a group of people who wanted to (somewhat jokingly) bring the moustache back into style. The next year they started getting people to grow mo’s for causes. Now people participate in Movember to raise awareness for men’s health, and it’s bigger than ever.

Our team members of MoMagnets have started discussing the various styles of mo’s that they’ll grow this year. It looks like there’s going to be some intra-team competition to grow the best mo. The top contenders? It’s looking like:

Matthew Chang - Movember

Matthew “The Chang” “Changarang” Chang sporting a well-groomed black moustache. Although it’s a standard ‘stache, the care put into keeping this beauty mo in tip-top shape is obvious. Can he do it again for this Movember?

Cameron Sapp - Movember

Cameron Sapp showing off a rock solid handle bar mo. The bars on this ‘stache are so impressive that it almost gives the illusion that this mo is taller than it is wide. Wait… is it?!

Check out the MoMagnets page and keep track of us! Please contribute what you can to help raise awareness for men’s health.

Articles

  • Python, Visual Studio, and C#… So. Sweet.: First one on the list this week is the post I put out on Monday about using Python, C#, and Visual Studio all together. It’s definitely for the developers out there, but for those of you who aren’t programmers, it’s still interesting to see how PyTools and IronPython have bridged a gap between C# and Visual Studio. I was pretty happy with the number of people who responded on social media and thought that it was a good read. The tweets actually led me to find a related post by Scott Hanselman from earlier this year (that I wish I saw sooner). My article has also received some pretty good visibility at Code Project which I’m excited about. Feel free to check it out over there too (people seem more likely to engage in discussion at Code Project versus on my blog)!
  • Want To Build A Business? Lead With Trust: David Hassell wrote an article that really hit home with me. Having a successful business means crafting a team and culture built upon trust. It needs to be the foundation of your team. Having high levels of trust makes everything else in the business come together more easily, but lacking trust can really make everything fall apart. Teams need to trust their leaders, and leaders need to trust their team members–it goes both ways.
  • Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Had His Top Execs Read These Three Books: John Fortt discusses his interview with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Now while I don’t read as much as I should (and I’m consciously trying to get better at it), I thought this little list of books might be great to keep my eye out for:
  • Confidence ‘boosts pupils’ academic success: I thought this article was a great find. It’s primarily around research that’s shown confidence plays a big role in students’ success, but I believe it applies outside of the realm of formal education. As a leader or mentor, I think it’s incredibly important to instill confidence. You want your team members to know you trust them with what they’re doing. They need to know they can make mistakes and learn without having to be punished for doing so. Having that confidence is going to be what makes them successful.
  • Leadership Lessons From LEGO: What do leadership and Lego have in common? A whole lot according to John Kotter. Consider innovation (get creative with those bricks!), overcoming challenges (can’t find that piece you were looking for?), team work (building things with friends is way more fun), and quality (it’s as good as you make it). It was an unexpected article for me to stumble upon, but I thought the parallels were interesting!
  • The Four Most Powerful Lessons in Management: Joel Peterson has some great points on being a successful leader or manager. Among them, putting actions behind your words, bring the right people on board (noticing a trend with having the right people yet?), and having a meaningful mission.
  • What is a Thought Leader?: I found myself asking this question at one point, which is why I wanted to share Daniel Tunkelang‘s article. It seems straight forward really. It’s important to have an area of expertise in the ideas you want to share, and it’s important that the things you’re sharing have meaning. In my case with Dev Leader, I certainly haven’t mastered leadership and programming, but I’m sharing the ideas that I’m hoping will some day get me there.
  • 17 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss: This was definitely a great read. At first, I started thinking “How could anyone in their right mind say these things to their boss”? But then I realized I had actually heard some of these things (or similar things) and it really got me thinking. Dave Kerpen has put together a great list, and although it’s humourous, it’s still something important to watch out for. Just in it for the money? Not your role? Some people need to get a grip or find something else to do in their career.
  • Why These Happiness “Boosters” Might Actually Make You Feel Worse: Gretchen Rubin shares some ideas on why certain things we do to make us happier may actually be counter-productive. One interesting one I thought was the idea of your attitude shaping your behaviour may actually be your behaviour shaping your attitude. On weekends I often hang around in a pair of shorts until I have to head out of my condo. If I got in the habit of being prepped to leave the house and be productive from the beginning of the day, would I find that I’m actually more productive? Worth trying!
  • What Makes Developers Really Great: Deane Barker shares his experience with a software developer that was giving off some bad vibes. So what’s a good developer? Is it just someone who can code? Do they need to know all the latest and best languages, dream in code, and have four computer science degrees? It certainly helps (and I don’t think many would dismiss it), but the one thing that’s really important is their attitude and ability to work in their team. Check out the comments on that blog post. If you’re working on a team and you can’t fit in the team, you’ll bring the whole team down. This means if you’re all soft skills and no hard skills, you can’t contribute squat. If you’re all hard skills and no soft skills, you’re going to be a road block to your team. You need to have both to be a really great developer.

Remember to check out the MoMagnets page! We’d really appreciate it. Follow Dev Leader on social media outlets to get these updates through the week.

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PROFIT HOT 50 – Weekly Article Dump

Magnet Forensics - Ranked #7 in Profit Hot 50!

PROFIT HOT 50

It’s with great honour that I can say the company I’m part of, Magnet Forensics, has achieved the 7th place in the Profit Hot 50 rankings for 2013. Last year Magnet Forensics was also on the list ranked at number 16th, but we’ve shown ourselves up by moving a full 9 positions! Our ranking in the Profit Hot 50 is even more impressive considering we’re the only company from Kitchener-Waterloo region in Ontario–Known for it’s incredible startup community and success stories–that made the list. We’re excited and tremendously proud of our accomplishments, but it’s certainly going to be quite the challenge for us to move up in rank next year. It’s a challenge we’re all ready to take on though. You can check out the ranking over here or at the official Profit Guide posting.

Articles

I’ll put the horn-tooting aside… even though it’s an incredible accomplishment (not sure that I mentioned that already).

  • Don’t Be A Perfectionist: Ilya Pozin discusses the downsides to being a perfectionist. Often, people call themselves perfectionists when they can’t think of some other weakness they might have (you see it a lot in interviews) and because they think it’s a loop-hole in the question. I mean, if your weakness is that you’re perfect… how can that be a weakness, right?! Well in reality, aside form being a cheesy way to answer an otherwise good interview question, perfectionism can certainly be a problem. Especially in a fast-paced startup environment, we’re often not hunting for perfect. We’re hunting for 80% perfect with 20% of the effort. It’s the only way we can keep moving fast and get products or services to our customers. Besides, we don’t know what “perfect” actually is… Our customers do. And if we never get anything to them, how the heck can we ever know what perfect is?
  • How Goofing Off Can Make You More Successful: In this article, Adam Rifkin discusses over work. It’s a great tie in to the articles I shared last week about burnout. Adam talks about why we often find ourselves in situations where we feel like we’re forced to over work to be successful and shared a handful of suggestions for how to avoid it. His top 3: Doing nothing. Socializing. Helping others. Sound counter-intuitive to your poor overworked soul? Well kick back, relax, and have a good read through his post 🙂
  • The New Rules for Career Success: In Dave Kerpen‘s article, he shares some answers from Dan Schawbel about what it means to have a successful career. Among the top points, Dan suggests looking inside your current company before looking for opportunities elsewhere. This is a a key point because instead of becoming a chronic company hopper you can actually look for other great opportunities in the company you’ve already invested yourself in. Additionally, Dan suggests acting like an entrepreneur at your current job. If you’ve already proven yourself successful at your role, look for side projects that can benefit your company.
  • The Part They Don’t Tell You About Startup Team Building: The end result of becoming a good leader is often that you obsolete yourself in your current job. It’s a strange truth about the position: You start off taking on a large workload and then lead others so that they can effectively take on your portion and more. Where does that put you as a leader though? Tomasz Tunguz discusses this leadership role evolution in his article.
  • Raspberry Pi + WordPress => PiPress: This is a bit of a shameless plug, but I thought it might be cool for any tech-savvy bloggers out there who are looking for a bit of a DIY. After reading all over The Internet for how I can use my Raspberry Pi, I discovered I could use it to host a blog. So, for what it’s worth, the text you’re reading right now is coming from a little computer just a tad bigger than a credit card.
  • The 7 Things That Will Stop You Getting Things Done: Do you find there are a lot of things throughout your day that cut into you working efficiently? Bernard Marr has a nice list of things that are likely chewing up your time and a handful of solutions for how you can minimize the effect they have on your life.
  • Business is Over: My New Post-Workday Transition RoutineJeanine O’Donnell uses a BBB acronym for helping her transition from work-mode to home-mode. How do you handle separating your work-life from your home-life? Is there even a separation for you?
  • The Business World Can Tear You Apart – If You Let It: Even after achieving financial success and success in your career, sometimes there’s just something missing. Joel Peterson shares some tips for how you can keep your career focus from taking away from the finer things in life.
  • 6 Ways to Put the Good (Bad and Ugly) in Goodbye—Part II: Last week I shared a post about a great example of how to say to goodbye to your employees when they’re leaving for other opportunities. This post by Chester Elton builds on that with more positive examples, but he also shares some downright terrible ways that people have been “let go” by their employers.
  • Adventures in Cat (and Dog) Sitting: What I Learned about Managing People: If you don’t know what your pets have in common with your employees, Whitney Johnson can help you out with that. Why is this comparison necessary? Well if you think about how some people treat their pets (letting them out for walks, feeding them when they need it, belly rubs, petting, etc…) there are a lot of parallels with your employees… Well, there should be. Your employees deserve a good environment to work in, being acknowledged for their hard work, and having engaging work.

That’s it for this week! I hope you checked out the Profit Hot 50 article I mentioned above. Follow Dev Leader on popular social media outlets to get these updates through the week!

Nick Cosentino – LinkedIn
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You can also check out Dev Leader on FlipBoard.


  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I work as a team lead of software engineering at Magnet Forensics (http://www.magnetforensics.com). I'm into powerlifting, bodybuilding, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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