Tag: test

xUnit Tests Not Running With .NET Standard

Having worked with C# for quite some time now writing desktop applications, I’ve begun making the transition over to .NET standard. In my professional working experience, it was a much slower transition because of product requirements and time, but in my own personal development there’s no reason why I couldn’t get started with it. And call me crazy, but I enjoy writing coded tests for the things I make. My favourite testing framework for my C# development is xUnit, and naturally as I started writing some new code with .NET Standard I wanted to make sure I could get my tests to run.

Here’s an example of some C# code I wrote for my unit tests of a simple LRU cache class I was playing around with:

    [ExcludeFromCodeCoverage]
    public sealed class LruCachetests
    {
        [Fact]
        public void Constructor_CapacityTooSmall_ThrowsArgumentException()
        {
            Assert.Throws<ArgumentException>(() => new LruCache<int, int>(0));
        }

        [Fact]
        public void ContainsKey_EntryExists_True()
        {
            var cache = new LruCache<int, int>(1);
            cache.Add(0, 1);
            var actual = cache.ContainsKey(0);
            Assert.True(
                actual,
                $"Unexpected result for '{nameof(LruCache<int, int>.ContainsKey)}'.");
        }
    }

Pretty simple stuff. I know that for xUnit in Visual Studio, I need to get a nuget package for the test runner to work right in the IDE. Simple enough, I just need to add the “xunit.runner.visualstudio” package alongside the xunit package I had already included into my test project.

Nuget package management for project in visual studio showing required xUnit packages.
Required xUnit nuget packages

Ready to rock! So I go run all my tests in the solution but I’m met with this little surprise:

[3/24/2020 3:59:10.570 PM] ========== Discovery aborted: 0 tests found (0:00:00.0622045) ==========
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.510 PM] ---------- Discovery started ----------
Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.ObjectModel.TestPlatformException: Unable to find C:[redacted]binDebugnetstandard2.0testhost.dll. Please publish your test project and retry.
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.CrossPlatEngine.Hosting.DotnetTestHostManager.GetTestHostPath(String runtimeConfigDevPath, String depsFilePath, String sourceDirectory)
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.CrossPlatEngine.Hosting.DotnetTestHostManager.GetTestHostProcessStartInfo(IEnumerable`1 sources, IDictionary`2 environmentVariables, TestRunnerConnectionInfo connectionInfo)
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.CrossPlatEngine.Client.ProxyOperationManager.SetupChannel(IEnumerable`1 sources, String runSettings)
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.CrossPlatEngine.Client.ProxyDiscoveryManager.DiscoverTests(DiscoveryCriteria discoveryCriteria, ITestDiscoveryEventsHandler2 eventHandler)
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.570 PM] ========== Discovery aborted: 0 tests found (0:00:00.0600179) ==========
Executing all tests in project: [redacted].Tests
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.635 PM] ---------- Run started ----------
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.639 PM] ========== Run finished: 0 tests run (0:00:00.0039314) ==========

Please publish your test project and retry? Huh?

As any software engineer does, I set out to Google for answers. I came across this Stack Overflow post: https://stackoverflow.com/q/54770830/2704424

And fortunately someone had responded with a link to the xUnit documentation: Why doesn’t xUnit.net support netstandard?

The answer was right at the top!

netstandard is an API, not a platform. Due to the way builds and dependency resolution work today, xUnit.net test projects must target a platform (desktop CLR, .NET Core, etc.) and run with a platform-specific runner application.

https://xunit.net/docs/why-no-netstandard

My solution was that I changed my test project to build for one of the latest .NET Frameworks… and voila! I chose .NET 4.8 as the latest available at the time of writing.

My next attempt at running all of my tests looked like this:

Executing all tests in project: [Redacted].Tests
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.635 PM] ---------- Run started ----------
[3/24/2020 3:59:20.639 PM] ========== Run finished: 0 tests run (0:00:00.0039314) ==========
[3/24/2020 4:08:14.898 PM] ---------- Discovery started ----------
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.00] xUnit.net VSTest Adapter v2.4.1 (32-bit Desktop .NET 4.0.30319.42000)
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.40]   Discovering: [Redacted].Tests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.47]   Discovered:  [Redacted].Tests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.00] xUnit.net VSTest Adapter v2.4.1 (32-bit Universal Windows)
[3/24/2020 4:08:16.289 PM] ========== Discovery finished: 2 tests found (0:00:01.3819229) ==========
Executing all tests in project: [Redacted].Tests
[3/24/2020 4:08:17.833 PM] ---------- Run started ----------
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.00] xUnit.net VSTest Adapter v2.4.1 (32-bit Desktop .NET 4.0.30319.42000)
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.41]   Starting:    [Redacted].Tests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.66]   Finished:    [Redacted].Tests
[3/24/2020 4:08:19.337 PM] ========== Run finished: 2 tests run (0:00:01.4923808) ==========

And I was back on my path to success! Hopefully if you run into this same issue you can resolve it in the same fashion. Happy testing!


Should My Method Do This? Should My Class?

Whose Job Is It?

I wanted to share my experience that I had working on a recent project. If you’ve been programming for a while, you’ve definitely heard of the single responsibility principle. If you’re new to programming, maybe this is news. The principle states:

That every class should have responsibility over a single part of the functionality provided by the software, and that responsibility should be entirely encapsulated by the class

You could extend this concept to apply to not only classes, but methods as well. Should you have that one method that is entirely responsible for creating a database connection, connecting to a web service, downloading data, updating the database, uploading some data, and then doing some user interface rendering? What would you even call that?!

The idea is really this: break down your code into separate pieces of functionality.

Easier Said Than Done… Or Is It?

The idea seems easy, right? Then why is it that people keep writing code that doesn’t follow this guideline? I’m guessing it’s because even though it’s an easy rule, it’s even easier to just… code what works.

The recent experience I wanted to share was my work on a project that has a pretty short time frame to prove it was feasible. It was starting something from scratch, so I had all the flexibility in the world to design code however I wanted to. I really made an effort to keep asking myself this one question: Whose job is it?

Every time I asked that question and found that it was not my current method’s responsibility, I would ask “Is this class really responsible for that”? I’d either go make myself a new method in my class or I’d just go immediately make a new class with a single method on it. It seemed like a bit of extra overhead each time I had to do it, but was it worth it in the end?

Absolutely. After the project had proven itself and development continued on, I was easily able to refactor code (where necessary) and mock out functionality in my coded tests. Instead of trying to write test setup code that required a whack of classes I needed to initialize, I could mock out a couple of interfaces and test with ease. It was also really obvious which pieces were responsible for what functionality.

Final Thoughts

If you want to get better at following the single responsibility principle, I think it starts with one question: Whose job is it? Try it out!


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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I have nearly a decade of professional hands on software engineering experience in parallel to leading multiple engineering teams to great results. I'm into bodybuilding, modified cards, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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