Tag: TODO

Timeboxing: TODO List 2.0!

I recently wrote about TODO lists and how they can help with focus now that many of us are working from home. I had a former colleague on LinkedIn mention this concept of “timeboxing” (which I think many people are familiar with the general idea) and how that can improve the effectiveness of a TODO list.

Here’s the post I made on LinkedIn sharing my blog article:

And the comment that came in right away from Graeme Harvey:

Graeme Harvey - Timeboxing

This obviously got me thinking because sure, Elon Musk is a pretty smart dude, but I also have a lot of respect for Graeme and his perspective on things. So I decided I’d try something out!

TODO Lists v1.0

My original TODO lists didn’t factor in any timeboxing techniques, but they had some benefits. The engineering mind in me says this is a great opportunity to do a little bit of a pros & cons analysis, so if you didn’t think I was nerdy before… Buckle up!

Pros:

  • Generally written out in the order I want (or need) to get things done. Acts a bit like a schedule in that regard.
  • Can have big and small items on the list.
  • Making progress on small items can help build momentum.
  • Let’s me record all the things I want (or need) to get done in the day and track if I did that or not

Cons:

  • No concept of how many things are too many or too few for an entire day’s worth of activity… There’s no timeboxing!
  • No concept of relative time spent on things (If I wrote “eat breakfast” and “Write a novel”, do they each get equal amount of time?)

TODO Lists v1.1

Okay we’re not quite yet at version 2.0 for these, but I took some of the concepts Graeme was referring to and I’ve implemented them every day since he made the comment. I’ve been trying to gauge how things have been going in terms of productivity and I’m already impressed. In fact, writing this blog post is part of my TODO list with timeboxing constraints (so meta, right?).

So the changes I made were very subtle but I’ll list them below:

  • I dropped the concept of putting in order what has to get done. Much of what I’m working on right now doesn’t have true dependencies, so trying to come up with an order for things doesn’t make sense (right now).
  • Every item I write down I put a time estimate on in minutes or hours. Literally everything. Remember I said little things like “Eat breakfast” can still be a TODO item that can help you feel like there’s momentum? Right. Breakfast, 10 minutes. Lunch, 15 minutes. Everything gets a time!
  • I tally up the total time my TODO list should take with timeboxing and do a gut check. I’m at least awake for 16 hours (typically people sleep like 8 hours, right?), but it’s probably closer to 18 hours. Because I’m starting off and don’t have great estimates, I’m ensuring I’m around the 12 hour mark for filling up my day.
  • I’m purposefully leaving some wiggle room in my schedule so that I can try incrementally building this out to be more accurate.

Nothing groundbreaking to implement, but what have I noticed so far?

  • Having a (relatively) small list of things I need to get done and getting to pick the next thing I want to tackle is kind of nice. A bit of flexibility is great!
  • The timeboxing really helps me make sure I’m focused on what I set out to do. 1 hour to review interview questions? Better not scroll on Instagram. 30 minutes to research a topic? Better not be on YouTube.
  • Some estimates for things are way off and some are very accurate! That’s okay though, because the following day I can adjust my estimates accordingly.
  • The overall feeling of being productive and making progress, for me at least, is even higher than it was before.

I’ve really enjoyed this small tweak and I’m hoping to get this to v2.0 status really soon 🙂 Thanks Graeme!


TODO Lists: Keeping focused when you feel lost

TODO List - Photo by Tirachard Kumtanom from Pexels

It’s more relevant for more people now than it probably has been in other times in their professional careers, but COVID-19 means remote work for a lot of people. It also means no work for a lot of people too. I’ve found that a simple tool for me to keep focused is leveraging a TODO list. It’s so simple that I think people often overlook the power of a TODO list when you’re feeling like you’re a bit lost or not making progress.

With your TODO list, the first thing I’d suggest is thinking about a daily routine. Now that you’re working remote, or in the unfortunate case out of work, I think it’s really important that you keep some sort of daily routine to help give you some guard rails. Think about what things you usually do in the morning. What does your lunch look like? How about the later afternoon and into the evening? What does before bed look like? Thinking through your routine will give you an idea of the things you want to focus on and then give you an idea of how much time you’ll need for regular things and how much time you’ll have remaining for stuff that can pop up.

The next thing I’d suggest with your TODO list is to get granular. This is especially important in my opinion if you’re struggling to feel like you’re making progress on anything. You can even write things down like “brush your teeth”. It doesn’t have to be specific to work and it doesn’t have to be anything groundbreaking. You’ll find that as you start making progress by checking off small items that suddenly you’re accomplishing a lot and a day might have gone from feeling like nothing getting done to fulfilling, or from insurmountable to progress being made! The small steps you can take while working through your TODO list are a great way to remind yourself that you’re making progress.

It’s also a good opportunity to remind yourself that these are very strange times for many of us. If you’re working from home or at home and out of work, these could be very new circumstances for you and not at all like your normal routine. That’s okay! Remember the rest of the world is in this together with you.

You should be affording yourself the time to do little things here and there around the house even if you’re working remotely. For example, if you hear your washer/dryer go off in the middle of the day, instead of letting that be something that’s nagging you in the back of your mind consciously go make the time to take a few minute break and change loads of laundry! There are plenty of unique distractions to be had while working from home, but instead of letting them distract you take control and consciously spend the time on the appropriate things.

A sample TODO list might look like the following:

  • AM
    • Get the dog outside!
    • Feed the dog
    • Eat breakfast
    • Hygiene routine
    • Coffee + read news
    • Answer emails
    • Work on Project A
    • Video meeting 1
    • Continue Project A
  • Afternoon
    • Eat lunch
    • Get the dog outside!
    • Do the dishes
    • Answer emails
    • Video meeting 2
    • Work on Project B
    • Get work schedule planned for tomorrow
  • Evening
    • Eat dinner
    • Get the dog outside!
    • Get some exercise!
    • Hygiene routine
    • Pick-a-chore around the house
    • Watch TV/Movie or play a game
  • Before Bed
    • Hygiene routine
    • Read your current book
    • Write out your TODO list for tomorrow

You might have read through that and thought that it feels silly to have a line item for something as simple as brushing your teeth or eating a meal. And that’s totally normal for some people! You might have adapted really well to your change of environment and you’ve got little to no issues adjusting. For others, that won’t be the case. If you’re struggling to feel like you’re making progress, staying on track, or if that the day seems like you’ll never accomplish everything you need to… Take the little wins with very simple things. You’ll notice that you’ll build momentum for yourself.

A friendly reminder to make sure you take the time to get your TODO list together before the next day! I like doing it right before bed so I can run through what I think my following day will look like.


Hack Your TODO List With Google Keep

Hack Your TODO List With Google Keep

Trying To Keep It Alllll Together…

I’m a big fan of TODO lists. I find that they’re a great way for me to set up a bunch of tasks and feel really productive as I work through them. I’ll make TODO lists for almost anything. What do I need to get done tomorrow morning at work? What groceries do I need to get? What topics am I thinking of blogging about? I’ll get some sort of TODO list going for anything.

The one thing that I need in my TODO list to stay effective is to constantly have it around me to remind me. I was running the Evernote app on my Android phone and recently made the observation that things that I put in there had a much higher likelihood of getting done versus things I put in my work notebook. The reason? I check my phone a lot more than my work notebook. I have my phone with me when I grocery shop. I have it before and after I workout at the gym. It’s my alarm in the morning so I have access to it as soon as I wake up. My work notebook? Not so much.

The problem here is that my important work tasks I want to accomplish were not getting the same treatment my out-of-work tasks were getting. They weren’t getting the same success rate.

Enter Google Keep

I try to meet up with my teammates once a month to discuss their goals or things we need to work through at the office. In my last round of one-on-ones, I was discussing my TODO lists with one of my colleagues, Samantha. She said that she noticed I was using Evernote, but was curious of I’ve ever tried out Google Keep. I admitted that I hadn’t, but she was speaking highly of it. “Why not give it a shot?” I thought. But it hacked my TODO list concept in a big way.

Google Keep has one feature that I think is totally awesome on my phone. I never tried this with Evernote, so I’m not claiming that it can’t do this. The phone widget is truly awesome. Right on my homescreen of my phone, I can see my TODO lists. This takes that first point I was discussing (need to have access to it all the time) to a whole new level. Now instead of having to go to the app itself to get refreshed on what I need to do, almost any time I touch my phone I’m having visibility into my TODO lists.

A second powerful feature is the idea of checkboxes for progress. This probably sounds like it’s not all that important. “Google Keep has checkboxes? Great… I have bullet points in any other app I can get my hands on!” I can hear you saying that now 😉 But it’s different. I was using Evernote and keeping bulleted lists, and when I was through with something, I’d just delete the whole bullet point. The idea of checking things off your list is powerful because it shows you that your making progress. I can see that I have only 3 of 10 items left on my list and that gives me a bit more drive to try and knock off the rest. If my list is always just a view of what’s left, it will always feel like it’s never done.

Summary

I’m not trying to push Google Keep or bash Evernote here… I’m just trying to show you how a few simple hacks in my TODO lists were able to provide some real positive benefits. For me, the things I need in my TODO list technology are:

  • Easy to access
  • Ability to access frequently
  • Insight into progress I’m making on the list
  • … Not cost me a cent!

Your list might look a bit different. You could argue that you don’t always want the list in front of you or that you don’t want total transparency into the progress you’re making. I can’t speak for you in terms of what will be most effective, but I highly recommend Google Keep after using it for only a couple of weeks.

Now my only problem is that I look like I’m ignoring people if I’m taking notes on my phone in a meeting! Thanks for the suggestion, Sam!


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  • Nick Cosentino

    Nick Cosentino

    I have nearly a decade of professional hands on software engineering experience in parallel to leading multiple engineering teams to great results. I'm into bodybuilding, modified cards, and blogging about leadership/development topics over at http://www.devleader.ca.

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