Tag: video games

RPG Game Dev Weekly #1

As I’ve been trying to get more YouTube content put together more steadily, one of the themes I’m interested in is doing some behind-the-scenes of the role playing game (RPG) I’m making with some friends in Unity3D. I’ve found that being able to work on an RPG outside of my regular day job is a really awesome way for me to keep up on my technical skills. I love coding, and the further along I move in my career as an engineering manager, the less time I actually spend writing code myself. I pride myself in being a technical engineering manager, so for me working on this RPG is a great outlet for creativity and practice. I mentioned this in my LinkedIn post here:

Persisting Game Objects Across Maps

In this video, I focus on one of the challenges the game was facing due to how objects are materialized onto the playable map. The map that we load from disk to be shown and interacted with in the playable RPG commonly has “templates” and “spawners”. Both of these are responsible for creating objects at runtime given some criteria. As a result, uniquely placed game objects appear on the playable map for the player to interact with.

Sounds good then, right? Well the two challenges I focused on addressing were:

  1. If we leave the map and go to another one, there’s no way to persist the player across maps! That means you get a brand new character every time you transition maps. In an RPG, this is definitely not going to work out.
  2. If we return to an existing map, we expect it to be in the same state as when we were last on it. This means that the objects generated from templates or spawners must remain and NOT be respawned (which would effectively make completely new game objects).

Check out the video below:

RPG Dev Log 1 – Persist Game Objects Across Maps

Persisting Map Game Objects in a Cache

Next up was actually implementing some of the changes being discussed previously. In order to make this work in our RPG, my goal was to:

  1. Allow maps to save a lookup of the unique IDs for game objects that were generated
  2. Save the list of game objects generated into a “cache”
  3. Upon revisiting a map, tap into the “cache” to reload the existing game objects

One of my mental hurdles with this was acknowledging that we don’t yet have a solid serialization foundation for our game. I was thinking I’d want to serialize the game data to something persistent to make this work, but I was also worried writing things to disk would be overkill (and how does this mix with save game concepts?). Instead, I opted for the lightweight approach was “get something working” and I can revisit this later to extend it to persist things to disk if necessary.

Check out the video below:

RPG Dev Log 2 – Persisting Map Game Objects in a Cache

Which Domain Does This Belong To?

We’ve been trying to practice Domain Driven Design (DDD) concepts in our game. One pattern I’ve taken to an extreme is over-separating domains into very granular pieces and the result is that we have HUNDREDS of C# projects. It’s overkill, for sure. However, I feel that it’s offered some flexibility in having boundaries we can collapse later. My experience so far has told me it’s easier to collapse boundaries than it is to split.

This is all and well until we have situations where I need a class that has knowledge of two domains. That’s what this next video was about. I talk through acknowledging that I don’t know what to do and that I’ll move ahead with something best effort. I think the answer to my dilemma is that I need to translate things into a new domain for usage, but it feels like overkill. If you have thoughts on this leave a comment on this post or on the video!

Check out the video below:

RPG Dev Log 3 – Which Domain Does This Belong To?

Death Animations For All!

Finally, this last update was about something hopefully less boring… Death animations! I worked through how:

  1. I can extend our reusable sprite animation factory to create a death animation to be reused by ALL our actor sprites
  2. I can build a system that checks actor life and changes the animation as necessary to death

Unfortunately I had some hiccups the first time through recording this, but I wanted to code the whole thing live. After a Blue Screen of Death interrupted my first attempt, my second attempt I think worked pretty well! Without much code at all we could get this system fired up and it worked the first time! Well, close. I didn’t realize that our animation system already supports an animation that has an “infinite” duration final frame (in this case, the body laying on the tile). This is handled by a null value instead of a set length in seconds. I fixed it right after recording! Overall, I was incredibly happy with the result.

Check out the video below:

RPG Dev Log 4 – Death Animations For All!

Article Summaries: Weekly Article Dump #17

Article Summaries: Weekly Article Dump #17 (Image from http://www.sxc.hu/)

Articles

  • It’s official: Video games make your brain bigger: I don’t have much time for video games anymore, but this is still totally awesome news. It’s in. It’s official. Video games can actually make you smarter. How great is that? If you’re like me and you find you don’t have much time for games any more, it might be worth picking up a hobby game. It’s a great way to relax provided you don’t get too addicted to it and apparently it can make you smarter. Perfect combo!
  • The myth of the brainstorming session: The best ideas don’t always come from meetings: I thought this article was pretty interesting because we do a lot of brain storming at our office. Sometimes I like to think the sessions go smoothly or that they’re productive. When I contrast them with particular cases that are a bit out of our ordinary approach, it seems like there are certainly some factors that improve the outcome.
    We’ve been dabbling in some personality tests to understand team dynamics a little bit better. To the article’s point, extroverted personalities almost always overrun introverted personalities in a brainstorming meeting from my experience. It’s really unfortunate actually and clearly not really fair if everyone is supposed to be getting their ideas out. In order to get the best results, I think that everyone needs a way to get their thoughts out, and sometimes it’s not doable if you have certain people overrunning others.
    The article also touches on a fear of judgement concept that I think certainly holds true. In a recent brainstorming style meeting, instead of having individuals put on the spot and discuss their opinions, we white boarded them all at once. There was anonymity aside from when the person right beside you writing could peek at what you were putting down. The results were much better than any of our previous meetings of this style. I can’t be entirely sure that the whiteboarding was the reasoning, but it’s definitely something I’d like to try again in the future.
  • Matt Chang – Team Magnet Recognition: This is a post I put out earlier this week. As part of my attempt to recognize the amazing team of people I work with at Magnet Forensics, I decided to write up about our superstar customer/tech support. I know I’d never survive in a tech support role, so I have even more respect for Matt Chang being able to do such a good job. He’s been a great addition to the team, and he makes our troubleshooting of customer issues infinitely easier. Thanks for all your amazing work, Matt.
  • 6 Talent Management Lessons From the Silicon Valley: In this article by John Sullivan, he discusses talent management in the valley. The fundamental idea here is that it’s all driven by innovation. Some key take away points from the article is that innovation is actually a more important goal than productivity and the ability to move fast has a huge affect on this. Additionally, people who innovate want to have an impact. Sharing stories about how previous feats have proven to have a great impact can also be a great driving force.
  • Quality & Agility in Software: Session With Paul Carvalho: This is another article I put out this week about Paul Carvalho who came to speak to our development team. Simply put, the time we had with Paul was packed with information and activities. Every second we spent with him felt like we were absorbing something new and useful. It was far too short. We had lots of great learnings to take away and bring to our own drawing board. We’re excited to be implementing some changes in the upcoming week.
  • Rather than Whine, We Can Learn from the Boring Aspects of a JobMohamed El-Erian reminds us that even the most interesting and glamorous jobs have dull moments. We shouldn’t whine or avoid these situations–they’re vital stepping stones. It’s not realistic to assume you can cut every corner and take every shortcut to get exactly where you want in your career and in life. You have to work hard at what you do and embrace even the small things that can seem boring and monotonous.
  • Fragments: Creating a Tabbed Android User Interface: This is yet another one of my posts that I shared this week. This is my first Android tutorial, and I’m pretty proud of it! It’s very basic, has lots of pictures, and all of the sample code is available to download. I’m confident that anyone interested in picking up Android programming would be able to follow along. Even experienced programmers looking for a way to get a tabbed user interface using fragments in their Android app should find some benefit too! I just found out today that my tutorial made it into the Android Weekly Issue #76, so that was pretty exciting. You can download the app too (it’s pretty basic) to see what the end result will be. Check it out and let me know what you think.

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