Tag: gui

NoesisGUI – The Unity UI Framework That You Probably Aren’t Using!

If you’re like me, trying to create user interfaces in general is a challenge. So when it comes to working in tools that you’re less familiar with, that challenge basically grows to a level where it’s a roadblock. For me, trying to create user interfaces in Unity3D is basically the perfect example of hitting this roadblock! That’s not to say the UI tools that are available in Unity3D are bad, but my skill level is essentially reset to zero when working with these tools. Fortunately I came across this little gem called NoesisGUI that enables WPF inside of Unity3D!

I plan to do a few updates on this either via YouTube or short blog posts, but NoesisGUI has essentially unlocked my ability to create user interfaces inside of Unity3D. You can find my intro video here, or watch it directly below:

Now I’m still not a UI expert by any means, but at least I get my familiar environment back. NoesisGUI has two primary benefits for me as a software developer:

  • I have access to all the WPF controls, XAML syntax, and styling capabilities that I know and love.
  • I can use tools/IDEs I’m familiar with, not sacrificing years of experience using these tools.

On the first point, for me I find it very tedious to create UI elements in Unity3D. For some good examples, I consider trying to do two pretty common things: control layout and lists of items. On control layout, I find the anchoring system and transforms a total pain to work with in Unity3D. It’s a personal preference sort of thing, but I find it difficult to navigate and get things to work as I expect. However, I know thanks to NoesisGUI I can leverage things like grids and flowing panels so I can use what I know and not try to design a layout system from scratch. Same thing goes with lists! I can use a ListView control thanks to NoesisGUI and then style/template all the controls inside of it leveraging XAML. Effectively, being able to leverage NoesisGUI to enable my experience with WPF means I can struggle with UI design instead of struggling with UI design AND how to make the UI framework work! It doesn’t fix my poor UX abilities, but NoesisGUI does allow me to do my best work at least.

The second point is around tooling. The Unity3D editor is powerful and if you watch any amount of tutorials from YouTube you’ll know that there’s no shortage of people showing how to drag and drop objects into the scene to get the result you’re after. But this doesn’t work well for my design approach because I don’t want my game to be coupled to the Unity3D engine (which I’ll need to write more about later). In fact, the more things I place concretely in the scene, the more it couples my game to Unity3D and it’s just not something I want to commit to. As a result, to decouple my UI code I found myself trying to programmatically make Unity3D UI elements and started to dream up some templating language.

Nonsense. NoesisGUI puts me back in my comfort zone and allows me to use familiar tools like Blend where I get my visual editor for my WPF controls as well as the split view with the XAML editor. Aside from a couple of minor quirks, I was able to get Blend to show things exactly as Unity3D shows them. That means I can rapidly develop my game UI inside of Blend. Along with with a bunch of other design philosophies (i.e. decoupling from Unity3D engine), this means we could literally write a couple-of-line game entry point with a WPF UI overtop of it directly in Blend and have it map to expected behavior in Unity3D. Again, more on some of those design philosophies later, but NoesisGUI really took it to the next level by allowing us to decouple the UI completely from Unity3D restrictions.

I plan to create more writeups and videos on how we’re using NoesisGUI in our RPG project, so stay tuned!


Git + Google Code + Windows

Just a quick one here because I’m hoping it will benefit a person or two. I’d like to start by stating I’ve always been a Windows user. I don’t like using Macs and I don’t like using *nix. Why? It’s just my preference, and I’ll leave it at that (I don’t have an emotional attachment to Microsoft or anything, I’m just well versed with Windows). Anyway… I was recently trying to get a Google Code page setup for one of the postings I wrote. However, being a Windows user made things pretty difficult. Here’s how I solved my problem:

  • Install GitExtensions (I already had this installed, because I use this for everything)
  • Created my google code account and created my project.
  • Changed my google code account permissions to allow my GMail credentials when pushing. You can do that here.
  • Navigate to this page (well, the equivalent for your project), which gives you a nice address for cloning:
    git clone https://your-user-name@code.google.com/p/your-project-name/
  • Use git extensions to clone this repo somewhere. If you just made your project, it’ll be empty! Makes sense.
  • Add all the stuff you need to, and then make your first commit.
  • Push up your code! But…
  • —-Here is where it all broke down—-
Okay, so I can’t push up code because my remote isn’t setup properly now. Something to the tune of:

“C:Program Files (x86)Gitbingit.exe” push –recurse-submodules=check –progress “origin” master:master
error: The requested URL returned error: 500 while accessing https://n.b.cosentino@code.google.com/p/event-handler-example/info/refs?service=git-receive-pack
fatal: HTTP request failed
Done

But why?! I’m pushing to origin! Well, that’s exactly why. ‘origin’ in my case refers to the repository I have on a different server–NOT where google code is! What did I do next then? Googled like mad until I got to here. Thank you StackOverflow, yet again.
Next steps:
  • From git extensions, launch the bash window. And yes, believe me… I get super nervous as soon as I have to use the console I’m unfamiliar with.
  • Next, I used these two beautiful commands:
$ git remote add googlecode https://project.googlecode.com/git
$ git push googlecode master:master
  • I had to enter my credentials next… But that’s easy.
  • And the rest is history! The two commands simply added a “remote” called googlecode and then pushed my branch up to the googlecode remote.

It was actually an extremely simple solution, I just wasn’t paying attention to what exactly was wrong. I figured by cloning the repo initially it knew where the correct remote was. Unfortunately, that’s not the case.


  • Copyright © 1996-2010 Dev Leader. All rights reserved.
    Jarrah theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress